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Learning Objectives

By the end of this section, you will be able to: • Describe the difference between the central and peripheral nervous systems • Explain the difference between the somatic and autonomic nervous systems • Differentiate between the sympathetic and parasympathetic divisions of the autonomic

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Learning Objectives By the end of this section, you will be able to: • Describe the difference between the central and peripheral nervous systems
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nervous system

The nervous system can be divided into two major subdivisions: the central nervous system (CNS) and the peripheral nervous system (PNS), shown in Figure 3.13. The CNS is comprised of the brain and spinal cord; the PNS connects the CNS to the rest of the body. In this section, we focus on the peripheral nervous system; later, we look at the brain and spinal cord.

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Figure 3.13 The nervous system is divided into two major parts: (a) the Central Nervous System and (b) the Peripheral Nervous System.

PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM

The peripheral nervous system is made up of thick bundles of axons, called nerves, carrying messages back and forth between the CNS and the muscles, organs, and senses in the periphery of the body (i.e., everything outside the CNS). The PNS has two major subdivisions: the somatic nervous system and the autonomic nervous system.

The somatic nervous system is associated with activities traditionally thought of as conscious or voluntary. It is involved in the relay of sensory and motor information to and from the CNS; therefore, it consists of motor neurons and sensory neurons. Motor neurons, carrying instructions from the CNS to the muscles, are efferent fibers (efferent means “moving away from”). Sensory neurons, carrying sensory information to the CNS, are afferent fibers (afferent means “moving toward”). A helpful way to remember this is that efferent = exit and afferent = arrive. Each nerve is basically a bundle of neurons forming a two- way superhighway, containing thousands of axons, both efferent and afferent.

The autonomic nervous system controls our internal organs and glands and is generally considered to be outside the realm of voluntary control. It can be further subdivided into the sympathetic and parasympathetic divisions (Figure 3.14). The sympathetic nervous system is involved in preparing the body for stress-related activities; the parasympathetic nervous system is associated with returning the body to routine, day-to-day operations. The two systems have complementary functions, operating in tandem to maintain the body’s homeostasis. Homeostasis is a state of equilibrium, or balance, in which biological conditions (such as body temperature) are maintained at optimal levels.

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This OpenStax book is available for free at http://cnx.org/content/col31502/1.4

 

 

Figure 3.14 The sympathetic and parasympathetic divisions of the autonomic nervous system have the opposite effects on various systems.

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