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eanings. a. Interpret figures of speech (e.g., hyperbole, paradox) in context and analyze

their role in the text. b. Analyze nuances in the meaning of words with similar denotations.

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6. Acquire and use accurately general academic and domain-specific words and phrases, sufficient for reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college and career readiness level; demonstrate independence in gathering vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression.

6. Acquire and use accurately general academic and domain-specific words and phrases, sufficient for reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college and career readiness level; demonstrate independence in gathering vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression.

 

 

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Common Core State StandardS for enGLISH LanGUaGe artS & LIteraCy In HIStory/SoCIaL StUdIeS, SCIenCe, and teCHnICaL SUbjeCtS

Language Progressive Skills, by Grade The following skills, marked with an asterisk (*) in Language standards 1–3, are particularly likely to require continued attention in higher grades as they are applied to increasingly sophisticated writing and speaking.

Standard Grade(s)

3 4 5 6 7 8 9–10 11–12

L.3.1f. Ensure subject-verb and pronoun-antecedent agreement.

L.3.3a. Choose words and phrases for effect.

L.4.1f. Produce complete sentences, recognizing and correcting inappropriate fragments and run-ons.

L.4.1g. Correctly use frequently confused words (e.g., to/too/two; there/their).

L.4.3a. Choose words and phrases to convey ideas precisely.*

L.4.3b. Choose punctuation for effect.

L.5.1d. Recognize and correct inappropriate shifts in verb tense.

L.5.2a. Use punctuation to separate items in a series.†

L.6.1c. Recognize and correct inappropriate shifts in pronoun number and person.

L.6.1d. Recognize and correct vague pronouns (i.e., ones with unclear or ambiguous antecedents).

L.6.1e. Recognize variations from standard English in their own and others’ writing and speaking, and identify and use strategies to improve expression in conventional language.

L.6.2a. Use punctuation (commas, parentheses, dashes) to set off nonrestrictive/parenthetical elements.

L.6.3a. Vary sentence patterns for meaning, reader/listener interest, and style.‡

L.6.3b. Maintain consistency in style and tone.

L.7.1c. Place phrases and clauses within a sentence, recognizing and correcting misplaced and dangling modifiers.

L.7.3a. Choose language that expresses ideas precisely and concisely, recognizing and eliminating wordiness and redundancy.

L.8.1d. Recognize and correct inappropriate shifts in verb voice and mood.

L.9–10.1a. Use parallel structure.

* Subsumed by L.7.3a † Subsumed by L.9–10.1a ‡ Subsumed by L.11–12.3a

 

 

Common Core State StandardS for enGLISH LanGUaGe artS & LIteraCy In HIStory/SoCIaL StUdIeS, SCIenCe, and teCHnICaL SUbjeCtS

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Standard 10: Range, Quality, and Complexity of Student Reading 6–12

Measuring Text Complexity: Three Factors

Qualitative evaluation of the text: Levels of meaning, structure, language conventionality and clarity, and knowledge demands

Quantitative evaluation of the text: Readability measures and other scores of text com- plexity

Matching reader to text and task: Reader variables (such as motivation, knowledge, and experiences) and task variables (such as purpose and the complexity generated by the task assigned and the questions posed)

note: More detailed information on text complexity and how it is measured is contained in Appendix A.

Range of Text Types for 6–12 Students in grades 6–12 apply the Reading standards to the following range of text types, with texts selected from a broad range of cultures and periods.

Literature Informational Text

Stories drama Poetry Literary nonfiction Includes the subgenres of adventure stories, historical fiction, mysteries, myths, science fiction, realistic fiction, allegories, parodies, satire, and graphic novels

Includes one-act and multi-act plays, both in written form and on film

Includes the subgenres of narrative poems, lyrical poems, free verse poems, sonnets, odes, ballads, and epics

Includes the subgenres of exposition, argument, and functional text in the form of personal essays, speeches, opinion pieces, essays about art or literature, biographies, memoirs, journalism, and historical, scientific, technical, or economic accounts (including digital sources) written for a broad audience

 

 

Common Core State StandardS for enGLISH LanGUaGe artS & LIteraCy In HIStory/SoCIaL StUdIeS, SCIenCe, and teCHnICaL SUbjeCtS

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Texts Illustrating the Complexity, Quality, and Range of Student Reading 6–12 Literature: Stories, dramas, Poetry Informational texts: Literary nonfiction

6–8

 Little Women by Louisa May Alcott (1869)

 The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain (1876)

 “The Road Not Taken” by Robert Frost (1915)

 The Dark Is Rising by Susan Cooper (1973)

 Dragonwings by Laurence Yep (1975)

 Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry by Mildred Taylor (1976)

 “Letter on Thomas Jefferson” by John Adams (1776)

 Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave by Frederick Douglass (1845)

 “Blood, Toil, Tears and Sweat: Address to Parliament on May 13th, 1940” by Winston Churchill (1940)

 Harriet Tubman: Conductor on the Underground Railroad by Ann Petry (1955)

 Travels with Charley: In Search of America by John Steinbeck (1962)

9–10

 The Tragedy of Macbeth by William Shakespeare (1592)

 “Ozymandias” by Percy Bysshe Shelley (1817)

 “The Raven” by Edgar Allan Poe (1845)

 “The Gift of the Magi” by O. Henry (1906)

 The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck (1939)

 Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury (1953)

 The Killer Angels by Michael Shaara (1975)

 “Speech to the Second Virginia Convention” by Patrick Henry (1775)

 “Farewell Address” by George Washington (1796)

 “Gettysburg Address” by Abraham Lincoln (1863)

 “State of the Union Address” by Franklin Delano Roosevelt (1941)

 “Letter from Birmingham Jail” by Martin Luther King, Jr. (1964)

 “Hope, Despair and Memory” by Elie Wiesel (1997)

11– CCR

 “Ode on a Grecian Urn” by John Keats (1820)

 Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë (1848)

 “Because I Could Not Stop for Death” by Emily Dickinson (1890)

 The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald (1925)

 Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston (1937)

 A Raisin in the Sun by Lorraine Hansberry (1959)

 The Namesake by Jhumpa Lahiri (2003)

 Common Sense by Thomas Paine (1776)

 Walden by Henry David Thoreau (1854)

 “Society and Solitude” by Ralph Waldo Emerson (1857)

 “The Fallacy of Success” by G. K. Chesterton (1909)

 Black Boy by Richard Wright (1945)

 “Politics and the English Language” by George Orwell (1946)

 “Take the Tortillas Out of Your Poetry” by Rudolfo Anaya (1995)

Note: Given space limitations, the illustrative texts listed above are meant only to show individual titles that are representative of a range of topics and genres. (See Appendix B for excerpts of these and other texts illustrative of grades 6–12 text complexity, quality, and range.) At a curricular or instructional level, within and across grade levels, texts need to be selected around topics or themes that generate knowledge and allow students to study those topics or themes in depth.

 

 

Common Core State StandardS for enGLISH LanGUaGe artS & LIteraCy In HIStory/SoCIaL StUdIeS, SCIenCe, and teCHnICaL SUbjeCtS

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