+1 (208) 254-6996 [email protected]
  

Please study ppts and doc and answer the doc

Chapter 6

Don't use plagiarized sources. Get Your Custom Essay on
6 Hour Deadline
Just from $13/Page
Order Essay

Courage and Moral Leadership

6e

©2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.

©2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.

Learning Objectives

Combine a rational approach to leadership with a concern for people and ethics

Understand how leaders set the ethical tone in organizations and recognize the distinction between ethical and unethical leadership

Recognize your own stage of moral development and ways to accelerate your moral maturation

2

©2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.

Learning Objectives

Know and use mechanisms that enhance an ethical organizational culture

Apply the principles of stewardship and servant leadership

Recognize courage in others and unlock your own potential to live and act courageously

3

©2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.

Ethical Climate in Business

Leaders face pressures that challenge their ability to do the right thing

Obstacles for leaders

Personal weakness and self-interest

Pressures to:

Cut costs and increase profits

Meet the demands of vendors or business partners and look successful

Please shareholders

4

©2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.

Leaders Set the Ethical Tone

Act as positive role models

Signal what matters by their behavior

Focus on employees, customers, and the greater good

Not paying attention to gaining benefits themselves

Honest with employees, partners, customers, vendors, and shareholders

5

©2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.

Leaders Set the Ethical Tone

Strive for fairness and honor agreements

Share the credit for successes and accept the blame when things go wrong

Speak up against acts they believe are wrong

6

©2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.

Acting Like a Moral Leader

Recognize and adhere to ethical values

Acknowledge the importance of human meaning, quality, and higher purpose

Encourage others to develop and use moral values and adhere to ethical standards of conduct

7

©2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.

Exhibit 6.2 – How to Act Like a Moral Leader

8

Sources: Based on Linda Klebe Treviño, Laura Pincus Hartman, and Michael Brown, “Moral Person and Moral Manager: How Executives Develop a Reputation for Ethical Leadership,” California Management Review 42, no. 4 (Summer 2000), pp. 128–142; Christopher Hoenig, “Brave Hearts,” CIO (November 1, 2000), pp. 72–74; and Patricia Wallington, “Honestly?!” CIO (March 15, 2003), pp. 41–42

©2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.

Becoming a Moral Leader

Moral leadership: Distinguishing right from wrong and doing right

Seeking the just, honest, and good in the practice of leadership

Internal characteristic that influences a leader’s capacity to make moral choices is the individual’s level of moral development

9

©2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.

Exhibit 6.4 – Three Levels of Personal Moral Development

10

Sources: Based on Lawrence Kohlberg, “Moral Stages and Moralization: The Cognitive-Developmental Approach,” in Moral Development and Behavior Theory, Research, and Social Issues, ed. Thomas Likona (Austin, TX: Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 1976), 31–53; and Jill W. Graham, “Leadership, Moral Development, and Citizenship Behavior,” Business Ethics Quarterly 5, no. 1 (January 1995), 43–54

©2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.

Servant Leadership

Leader transcends self-interest to:

Serve the needs of others

Help others grow

Provide opportunities for others to gain materially and emotionally

Types

Authoritarian management

Participative management

Stewardship

11

©2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.

Exhibit 6.5 – Changing Leader Focus from Self to Others

12

©2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.

Authoritarian Management

13

Leaders set the strategy and goals, as well as the methods and rewards for attaining them

Organizational stability and efficiency are paramount

Subordinates are given:

No voice in creating meaning and purpose for their work

No discretion as to how they perform their jobs

©2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.

Authoritarian Management

14

Emphasis on:

Tight top-down control

Employee standardization and specialization

Management by impersonal measurement and analysis

©2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.

Participative Management

15

Actively involves employees

Employee suggestion programs

Participation groups

Quality circles

Leaders determine purpose and goals, make final decisions, and decide rewards

Employees are not allowed to be true partners in the enterprise

©2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.

Participative Management

16

Employees are expected to:

Make suggestions for quality improvements

Act as team players

Take greater responsibility for their own jobs

©2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.

Stewardship

Belief that leaders are deeply accountable to others as well as to the organization

Without trying to control others, define meaning and purpose for others, or take care of others

17

©2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.

Principles for Stewardship

18

©2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.

Adopt a partnership mindset

Give decision-making power and the authority to act to those closest to the work and the customer

Tie rewards to contributions rather than formal positions

Expect core work teams to build the organization

The Servant Leader

19

Puts service before self-interest

Listens first to affirm others

Inspires trust by being trustworthy

Nourishes others and helps them become whole

©2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.

Courage

Mental and moral strength to engage in, persevere through, and withstand danger, difficulty, or fear

Accepting responsibility

Nonconformity

Pushing beyond the comfort zone

20

©2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.

Courage

Asking for what you want and saying what you think

Abilene paradox: Tendency to resist voicing their true thoughts or feelings in order to please others and avoid conflict

Fighting for what you believe

21

©2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.

How Does Courage Apply to Moral Leadership

22

Applying courage to:

Be unconventional and do what is right

Step up and take responsibility

Balance:

Profit with people and self-interest with service

Control with stewardship

Act like a moral leader

Whistleblowing: Employee disclosure of illegal, immoral, or unethical practices in the organization

©2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.

Finding Personal Courage

23

©2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.

Believe in a higher purpose

Draw strength from others

Harness frustration and anger

Take small steps

©2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.

6e

©2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.

Leadership Mind and Emotion

Chapter 5

©2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.

Learning Objectives

  • Recognize how mental models guide behavior and relationships
  • Engage in independent thinking by staying mentally alert, thinking critically, and being mindful rather than mindless
  • Break out of categorized thinking patterns and opening your mind to new ideas and multiple perspectives

*

©2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.

Learning Objectives

  • Beginning to apply systems thinking and personal mastery to your activities at school or work
  • Exercising emotional intelligence, including being self-aware, managing emotions, motivating oneself, displaying empathy, and managing relationships
  • Applying the difference between motivating others based on fear and motivating others based on love

*

©2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.

Mental Models

  • Theories people hold about specific systems in the world and their expected behavior
  • Leaders can attain the desired outcome by arranging the key elements in the systems

*

©2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.

Mental Models

  • Assumptions are part of a leader’s mental model
  • About events, situations, circumstances, and people
  • Questioning assumptions help leaders understand and shift their mental models

*

©2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.

Changing or Expanding Mental Models

  • Leader’s mindset
  • Contextual intelligence – Ability to sense the social, political, technological, and economic context of the times
  • Adopting a mental model that enables an organization to respond effectively
  • Global mindset: Manager’s ability to influence individuals, organizations, and systems that represent different characteristics

*

©2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.

Developing a Leader’s Mind

*

Independent Thinking

Open-Mindedness

Systems Thinking

Personal Mastery

©2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.

Independent Thinking

  • Questioning assumptions and interpreting data and events
  • Mindfulness: State of paying attention to new information
  • Readiness to create new mental categories during evolving circumstances
  • Intellectual stimulation – Stimulating the ability of followers to identify and solve problems creatively

*

©2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.

Open-Mindedness

  • Putting aside preconceptions and suspending beliefs and opinions
  • Reflected well by beginner’s mind than by expert’s mind
  • Pike Syndrome – Illustrates the power of the conditioning that limits thinking and behavior

*

©2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.

Systems Thinking

  • Seeing the synergy of the whole and learning to reinforce or change whole system patterns
  • Enables leaders to:
  • Look for patterns of movement over time
  • Focus on the factors that accomplish the performance of the whole

*

©2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.

Exhibit 5.3 – Systems Thinking and Circles of Causality

*

©2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.

Personal Mastery

  • Discipline of mastering oneself
  • Qualities
  • Clarity of mind – Committing to the truth of the current reality
  • Clarity of objectives – Focusing on the end result
  • Organizing to achieve objectives – Bridging the disparity between current reality and the vision of a better future

*

©2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.

Emotional Intelligence

  • Abilities to perceive, identify, understand, and successfully manage emotions in oneself and others
  • Leaders should understand:
  • Range of emotions people have
  • How emotions manifest themselves

*

©2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.

Exhibit 5.4 – Positive and Negative Emotions

*

©2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.

Importance of Emotions

*

  • Leader’s emotional state influences the team, department, or organization
  • Leaders should:
  • Tune in to the emotional state of others
  • Bring negative emotions to the surface
  • Encourage people to explore and use positive emotion in work

Contagious

  • Leaders need a high degree of emotional intelligence to:
  • Regulate their emotions
  • Motivate others

Influence performance

©2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.

Exhibit 5.7 – Components of Emotional Intelligence

*

©2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.

Leadership

*

Leading with loveLeading with fear
Contemporary approachTraditional approach
More effectivePowerful motivator
Used when the organizational success depends on people’s: Knowledge Mind power Commitment Creativity EnthusiasmUsed when the organizational success depends on people following orders
Drives people to other organizations
People do not perform to their real capabilities

©2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.

Fear in Organizations

*

Fear of failure

Fear of change

Fear of personal loss

Fear of being judged

Fear of the boss

©2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.

Drawbacks of Fear

  • Creates avoidance behavior
  • Weakens trust and communication
  • Employees feel threatened by repercussions of speaking about work-related concerns

*

©2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.

Exhibit 5.8 – Indicators of Love versus Fear in Organizations

*

©2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.

Bringing Love to Work

  • Binds people through positive forces for a shared purpose
  • Attracts people to take risks, learn, grow, and move the organization forward
  • Love should be translated to behavior to make it a real force

*

©2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.

Bringing Love to Work

  • Meets unspoken employee needs
  • Hearing and understanding them
  • Disagreeing without making them wrong
  • Acknowledging their capabilities
  • Remembering to look for their good intentions
  • Telling them the truth with compassion

*

©2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.

Motivational Potential of Love versus Fear

*

  • Fear of losing a job

Fear-based motivation

  • Feeling of being valued in the job

Love-based motivation

Assignment #2

Download AMT.zip, unzip it into your Java workspace, and make sure it works. To help understand the program, you may run ATMMain.java.

The objective of this assignment is to evaluate the design of an existing object-oriented program (i.e., the ATM source code). For each problem, you must provide a detailed justification (i.e., why or why not). If necessary, you may use screenshots of the source code to illustrate your answers.

1. Class Design (30 points)

(a) Does each of the classes, ATM, Money, and Card, have a good class abstraction? (5 points for each)

(b) Consider the following variables in class SimulatedBank and related operations: ACCOUNT_NUMBER, WITHDRAWALS_TODAY, DAILY_WINTHDRAWAL _LIMIT, and BALANCE[]. How can you improve the design? (15 points)

2. Design by Contract (30 points)

Consider the precondition of method subtract in class Money:

public void subtract(Money amountToSubtract)

(a) Is this.cents – amountToSubtract.cents>=0 a demanding precondition of subtract? Does it violate the reasonable precondition principle or the precondition availability principle? (15 points)

(b) List all method calls of subtract in the ATM program and discuss whether each violates the condition amountToSubtract.cents>=0? You may need to inspect call hierarchies to determine whether the input of each call is safe. (15 points)

3. Class Invariant (30 points)

(a) For an object of ATM class, is it possible that switchOn is false and state=SERVING_CUSTOMER_STATE is true? Provide detailed justification of your answer based on the code. (15 points)

(b) Consider all constructors and setters (mutators) of Money class. For an object of Money class, is it possible that this.cents<0? (15 points)

4. Inheritance (10 points)

Is the class hierarchy of Transaction, Withdrawal, Transfer, Deposit, and Inquiry a good application of inheritance? The criteria should include module view vs type view, subcontracting (precondition/postcondition), and Liskov Substitution Principle

write 600 words and also write power point slides with min 2-3 peer reviewed references

Academic Journal Article Review Presentation

Upload Academic Journal Article Review Presentations

Please read the Powerpoint 5 and 6 and write the the doc and powerpoint presentation.

Write follow up for the mentioned below

This is leadership case study based on the life of Rebecca S. Halstead. She rose to high ranks in army, despite being in an industry not very open to women. She eventually retired and founded her own leadership development company (Groysberg & Bell, 2011). It contains accounts from her personal life which reflect how even under hostile conditions one can survive, build, create and co-create an effective organizational environment. She shares how she was surrounded by people so different from her yet she was constantly encouraged and motivated by her parents to give it a shot and not quit before trying. Her academy, West Point was hard, physically, emotionally and academically. I was singled out in this case because I was a woman. Yet she excel.

She has shared the following key leadership tips. Don’t quit- No matter what, give everything you take on a fair try. Position your highest when you are on your laps. Conduct AAR (After-Action Reviews). she began conducting day-to-day after-action appraisals; we named them AARs. she would encounter in her workplace at the culmination of the daylight with the management, and she would keep this to a short time, because it was after-hours, so it would be thirty minutes.

Rebecca had self-awareness. Overhaul for individuals round you. Halstead has continuously engaged into justification the distinct private life selections of her Militaries. She was capable to enter unfathomable than just the Combatant; she as well departed down to the family, and certainly got to recognize the Legionnaires’ relatives, where the children went to institute, what ranking they were in, what schools they attended. She took run-of-the-mill in the process of knowing her Armed forces.

She perceived the five personality traits. Support and assist individuals around your surroundings. Assisting other people to attain their goals and are portion of the superior achievement, the better virtuous, is mutually individually and workwise gratifying. Our philosophy is still so very conventional that it is going to take a extended period to alter. And I contemplate the manner we ought to transform it’s being gutsy sufficient—deprived of commencing with their battlements, or querulous or peevish. An immense fragment of this ethos transformation is to number out novel methods to present the delinquent, and a resolution, so that you do not inevitably put a self-justifying partition amidst individuals.

Be optimistic. Her colleagues scrap: Becky is always optimistic. That is perhaps her greatest strong point. Becky has a confident, considerate elegance. She overhauls about persons a lot. This woman amicable, friendly, likewise preemptively and theoretically capable. She is just well-versed. She is the generous individual that you just need to be near her. And she’s the kind of person that finds goodness in everyone (Renzi, 2019). She is the sort of trailblazer that makes you sense good of who you are. She’s a performer, and takes upkeep of her individuals well.

Make an enduring impression. There’re a unabridged lot of Militaries in the Military who are still a likeness of her headship. So, she is always creating an impression in the Defense force to date. Halstead alleged intensely in altruistic provision to other people, no matter in the secluded or civic subdivision, and in the aptitude of virtuous leadership to generate a modification for persons, establishments and societies.

Finally, she discussions, “If one really understand publics and recognize their emotions, then I think you have a much more capability to guide and impact and figure victory, whether independently or for the society. Leadership is the combination of emotion and cognizance, in altruistic accomplishment, for the advancement of others, to efficiently achieve the assignment, and to make a change.

References

Groysberg, B., & Bell, D. (2011). Rebecca S. Halstead: Steadfast Leadership. Harvard Business School Organizational Behavior Unit Case, (411-050).

Renzi, K. L. (2019). An Ethic of Innocence: Pragmatism, Modernity, and Women’s Choice Not to Know. SUNY Press.

Order your essay today and save 10% with the discount code ESSAYHELP