+1 (208) 254-6996 [email protected]
  

Chicago Public Art Project

Hum 201 WW [Semester] [Instructor] [Email] 1

Don't use plagiarized sources. Get Your Custom Essay on
Humanities
Just from $13/Page
Order Essay

Chicago Public Art Project

Point Value: 50 pts possible

50 pts for submitting project to BSP:Assignments by 11:59pm at the end of Module 3—Part 4

(your “Module 3 discussion: Selfhood and Space” asks you to share a portion of that Public Art Project with your classmates as well, and that discussion forum is worth an additional 30 pts)

PLEASE NOTE: This assignment requires that you visit public art sites in Chicago,[footnoteRef:1] so plan ahead! [1: If you are taking this class while living in another place, please reach out to the instructor asap about how to adapt this assignment for your locale.]

Step 1: Ponder and Plan

Did you know that, since 1978, a certain percentage of all city-funded construction projects for public and municipal spaces in Chicago must be spent on public art?

· Who are these public artists?

· Where is their art?

· How do these works reflect or “live” in a neighborhood?

· How do communities assign value to them…or not?

· Do the styles, content, media, or messages differ across Chicago’s map?

· Which art do you see from your window, your block, your el stop, your commute, your favorite places in the city?

· Can you imagine these spaces without the art? Do you imagine replacing them with different one?

This project asks you to EXPLORE public art in Chicago, using both a mirror and a window as your “lens.”

You are assigned to visit or re-visit FOUR public art works in person.

· TWO of them should be pieces that are already meaningful to you (i.e. they are in your neighborhood, you love them, you see them every day, etc.).

· The OTHER TWO should be pieces that are totally new to you (i.e. you’ve never seen them or noticed them before, you discover them along with a new neighborhood or area of the city, you seek them out because of the artist/style/medium, etc.)

Use the Chicago Public Art GuideYear of Public ArtCTA Public Art guide, and other resources posted in the Module 3—Part 3 folder to find new pieces or research the ones you already know. Conduct further research as needed and take notes on what you expect to see or hope to find. Map out your route and go!

Step 2: Visit and Explore

When you arrive at each piece, SPEND TIME with it! Move around it, touch it (if allowed), sit for a while, notice how others respond to it, observe what’s around it. Use principles for analyzing visual art to organize your observations and reflect on how the piece impacts you as the view and visitor. Take notes, write in a journal, TAKE PICTURES.

Step 3: Share and Enlighten Us!

After you have visited all four public art locations, write a TOUR GUIDE to share with us!

You should have four entries (one for each piece) in your tour guide.

Each entry should include:

1) Title (use italics for titles of visual art), artist, medium, date, and location of the piece

2) The story behind its creation (funding source, collaboration with community, location choice, intention behind the project, etc.)

3) Your analysis of the major elements of the work and what it “says” overall

4) How the piece relates to its context, environment, neighborhood, community.

5) A reflection on your own connection to the piece or your experience (re-)discovering it, what it means to you, how you think it should be viewed or valued, anything else you would like us to know.

6) Optional: interview others about what they think of the piece.

7) TWO ORIGINAL PHOTOS from two different vantage points, with captions.

8) Repeat this process for all four artworks that you selected.

*Good words/phrases to use when describing and analyzing visual works:

The work of art alludes to an idea… (NOTE: the work of art does not elude unless it avoids something like capture or definition.) The work of art conveys a message… The work of art evokes an emotional response… (NOTE: the work of art does not invoke unless it’s explicitly calling on a deity.) The work of art elicits an emotional response… (NOTE: the work of art does not illicit. Illicit is an adjective meaning forbidden or unlawful. Elicit is a verb) The artist illustrates an idea or story… The artist suggests an idea or emotion… The work of art or artist emphasizes an element, area, or mood…

Quoting and Citing your Sources

When you incorporate background research about the artist or artwork, you should only use reputable sources such as museum and university websites, or scholarly journals like those you can access through the HWC library, or the artist’s personal webpage (if they have one). You must also make sure to abide by the rules of academic honesty and provide appropriate MLA citations. TurnItIn will generate an “Originality Report” for your final draft, highlighting any wording that comes from another source (internet, another student’s paper, etc.) rather than your own head. Be sure to resolve any issues with your Originality Report before the due date by fixing the issue in your paper and resubmitting a corrected draft.

a. If the Originality Report only highlights passages of “matching text” that have been properly quoted and cited in MLA format (following the three steps listed below), then you are fine.

b. If, however, the Originality Report highlights any passages that have NOT been placed in quotation marks AND ALSO provided with an in-text citation and Works Cited page citation in MLA format, then you must fix these issues and resubmit a new draft by the due date.

Three steps to properly quote and cite your sources

Step 1: Put all borrowed wording in quotation marks, using proper MLA style

Formatting quotations in MLA style (Note that there are different formatting guidelines for quoting lines of poetry and for quoting lines of prose. Also, the length of the quotation affects the formatting that you should follow).

Step 2: Construct in-text parenthetical citations for all borrowed ideas (whether you’ve kept and quoted the original wording, or whether you’ve summarized or paraphrased it in your own words), using proper MLA style

· MLA In-text citations (basic book)

· MLA In-text citations (electronic sources)

· MLA In-text citations (artwork, movie, etc.)

Step 3: Construct a Works Cited page, using proper MLA style

MLA Works Cited page.

Hum 201 WW [Semester] [Instructor] [Email] 1

Public Art Project RUBRIC (50 pts)—due on BSP:Assignments

CriterionExceeds OutcomePtsMeets OutcomePtsEmerging SkillsPtsDoes Not Meet OutcomePts
ThoroughnessAuthor’s tour guide meets the requirements concerning length and fully addresses topic.5Author’s tour guide meets the requirement concerning length and addresses most of the topic.4Author’s tour guide is one section shy of the length requirements and partially addresses topic.3Author’s paper is more than one section shy of the length requirement and does not adequately address topic.2
Images of ArtworksReproduction of four artworks included, with complete caption (artist name, title, date, medium, link to the web source of the image)5Reproduction of four artworks included, with at least three of the following caption components (artist name, title, date, medium, link to the web source of the image)4Reproduction of at least three artworks included, but with no caption or very incomplete caption3Reproduction of 0-2 artworks provided.2
CitationsAll ideas and wording that came from outside sources are cited accurately in MLA style with in-text parenthetical citations and a Works Cited citation, and only reputable or scholarly sources (like museum websites, journals) are consulted.5All ideas and wording that came from outside sources are cited in MLA style with in-text parenthetical citations and a Works Cited citation, but there are some minor formatting errors4Ideas and wording that came from outside sources are given incomplete citations with in-text parenthetical citations OR a Works Cited entry; OR student copies and pastes large chunks of text from sources instead of incorporating details into the student’s own answer; non-scholarly sources (Wikipedia, blogs, etc.) are sometimes relied upon for info that was available from scholarly sources (museum websites, journals).3No quotations from outside sources were consulted, but assumptions were made that should have been investigated and cited; OR non-reputable sources (Wikipedia, blogs, etc.) are exclusively relied upon for info that was available from scholarly sources (like museum websites, journals).2
Clarity/Presentation[footnoteRef:2] [2: Consult the Purdue OWL website for information about the writing process, academic writing, grammar, punctuation, and mechanics.]Exceptionally clear, mechanically sound presentation that suffers only from rare, minor errors in sentence structure, grammar, or punctuation. Terminology and names are used accurately.5Generally clear, mechanically sound presentation that suffers from only occasional, not persistent, grammatical errors or from a repeated error that would not be caught by spell-check. There is no more than one minor inaccuracy regarding terminology or names.4Frequently unclear or mechanically unsound presentation that suffers from one persistent grammatical error or a few occasional grammatical errors. OR Misuses terminology or names numerous times.3Extremely unclear or mechanically unsound presentation demonstrating a lack of quality that does not meet expectations for a college-level paper (i.e. 10+ fixable errors). Has not been spell-checked. OR Frequently misuses terminology or names.2
Neighborhood/Environmental ContextIdentifies accurately and specifically the neighborhood or environmental context in which the work of art exists. Thoroughly describes how the artwork’s specific situation in this physical space affects its meaning.10Identifies the general neighborhood or environmental context in which the work of art exists. Describes how the artwork’s situation in this physical space affects its meaning, with minor omissions.9Identifies some aspects of the environmental context in which the work of art exists but with minimal connections to explain how the artwork’s situation in this physical space affects its meaning.7Does not identify the environmental context or explain how the artwork’s situation in this physical space affects its meaning.5
Artwork descriptionEach artwork’s subject matter, materials (media), scale, and other relevant formal elements are described thoroughly and accurately10Each artwork’s subject matter, materials (media), scale, and other relevant formal elements are described clearly, but with minor omissions9Some artworks’ subject matter, materials (media), scale, and other relevant formal elements are described, but with several omissions or inaccuracies7Some artworks’ subject matter, materials (media), scale, or other formal elements are described, with major omissions or inaccuracies5
Message/ MeaningClearly explains what each artwork conveys to the viewer, and all aspects of that interpretation are thoroughly supported by description of the artworks and their connection to the specific neighborhood/environmental context.10Explains several aspects of what most artworks convey to the viewer, and most aspects of that interpretation are supported by description of the artworks and their connection to the general neighborhood/ environmental context.9Explains some aspects of what several artworks convey to the viewer, and some aspects of that interpretation are supported by description of the artworks and their environmental context.7Explains little about what the artworks convey to the viewer; or the interpretation is made without clear evidence from the artworks and their physical context.5

Order your essay today and save 10% with the discount code ESSAYHELP