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Getting Started

This week’s devotion begins with reading a short summarized section of co-authors Steve Wilkens and Mark Sanford’s book, entitled Hidden Worldviews (2009, pp. 209-218):  In the reading below, the authors articulated four pillars for which a Christian worldview can be founded. The Bible is the first, as it serves as the foundation for the faith. Second is reason because God gifted us with minds to use for understanding and sharing. Third is experience. This pillar gives validity to the individual as their life aligns with God’s Word. Finally, the fourth pillar is tradition. This gives us comfort that we are both connected to our past as humans and hope for our race in the future.

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“Evaluation of our deepest convictions and the stories that shape our beliefs is of critical importance. Such an examination is not possible without a set of tools that allows us to be intentional about this process. Since worldview examination is an ongoing project, you will also need some of these evaluative instruments:

Expand all

Scripture

The first and primary criterion of truth is Scripture. It is the foundation of a Christian worldview. The Bible’s narrative about God’s involvement with his world provides trustworthy and foundational truths about human nature, about God’s nature and about God’s activity in our lives (both the present life and the afterlife). At the focal point of God’s engagement with his creation, we find Jesus, God in full humanity, whose life, teachings, death and resurrection illuminate our understanding of God and ourselves. While the Bible proclaims that God is the author of all truth, that he has revealed his truth and that his truth is knowable, it makes no claim to provide exhaustive truth. It will not tell you tomorrow’s high and low temperatures, how to pick a lock on a bank vault or how to surgically repair a torn rotator cuff. Moreover, even its information on spiritual matters is incomplete. Details about the afterlife are certainly sketchy, and Scripture itself tells us that most of Jesus’ activity and teaching is not contained within its pages (John 21:25). Nevertheless, a Christian worldview asserts that Scripture provides true and sufficient knowledge of God, his creation, our nature and purpose, and how we enter into and grow in our relationship to God. In short, Scripture is the first place we look and the final court of appeal in shaping a Christian worldview.

Reason

While Scripture provides unerring and sufficient truth in what it intends to teach, developing a Christian worldview requires use of our rational faculties as well. Though we could add to the list, we will mention three central functions of reason in constructing and evaluating worldviews. First, as we have said above, the Bible is silent on many matters. Its silence seems to indicate that it does not intend to operate as a textbook on organic gardening, art, physics, medieval European history and a host of other subjects. If a well-rounded Christian worldview needs to bring all reality under its scrutiny (and it does), our rational capacities must be employed to gather and analyze this information. Scripture certainly provides direction about how we should arrange and prioritize our information about such topics, but the information itself must come from other sources. A second legitimate role for reason is the interpretation of Scripture. While the Bible is God’s infallible Word, this Word must be read or heard. On the most basic level, reason must be operative for reading and hearing (if hearing means an understanding of what audible sounds signify) to occur. Reading and understanding do not take place without rationality. In addition, when we read and hear, we also interpret, which is a function of reason. We can’t get around that. Thus, reason, the second criterion of truth, is necessary to help us properly interpret the Bible’s message. Not all interpretations of Scripture, or any other source of information for that matter, are equal. Some are better than others. Without getting into a full-fledged discussion of what distinguishes good interpretive principles from less adequate ones, it seems safe to say that our principles of interpretation must have consistency and must be congruent with the whole of Scripture. Consistency and congruency are two characteristics of rational thought. Thus, developing a rational means for interpreting Scripture is one of many necessary roles the mind fulfills in worldview development. The final function of reason…allows us to organize and synthesize ideas into a coherent worldview. As part of this process, reason provides a way to understand how Christianity stands in relationship to worldviews that challenge and compete with the Christian perspective. No responsible Christian argues that reason should be trusted as an infallible authority. Likewise, no responsible Christian argues that reason can be bypassed completely. Between these two extremes, Christians embrace a broad spectrum of positions on the proper role of reason within the life of faith. As a result, while the basic features of Christian worldviews may remain the same, the details of rationality’s place within a Christian worldview have been contested for as long as Christianity has existed. The same is true for the relative role of our next two authorities—experience and tradition. All Christians rely on them, even if this reliance is not recognized or acknowledged, but in different ways and to different degrees.

Experience

The third criterion for sorting truth from error is experience. This term requires careful definition because experience is often equated with individual feelings. Many rely on such individual feelings as the primary criterion for determining whether something is true ‘for me.’ Because of the subjectivism implied in this, many Christians go to the opposite extreme and refuse to view experience as authoritative at all. Our definition of experience is not subjectivistic. Instead, an idea passes the test of experience if its claims are consistent with facts, observations and actual life events. Thus, experience isn’t pitted against Scripture or reason; the three are complementary. Life experience is one laboratory in which we test our understanding of Scripture and the conclusions we draw from reason. In other words, we are confident that the Bible’s truth is consistent with activities that result in the well-being of ourselves and others…it is impossible for a person to actually live as if no moral truth exists (moral relativism).

Tradition

The final criterion… is tradition. Our use of tradition refers to the church’s interpretation and application of Scripture to a variety of situations and issues over its two-thousand-year history. Tradition reminds us that our generation does not have a corner on truth. Instead, it tells us that we are connected with a “great cloud of witnesses” (Hebrews 12:1) whose collective wisdom can help us understand better how to navigate the Christian life. Even more than that, it expresses our confidence that, despite human limitations and sinfulness, the Holy Spirit works within God’s people to preserve truth. Tradition also helps us understand the means by which God’s people have deepened and maintained their relationship with God. One such vehicle for transformation has been participation in authentic Christian community. From day one in the church, Christians were urged to meet regularly with one another for the purpose of spurring spiritual growth, speaking the truth in love, encouraging one another, confessing sins to each other, and holding each other accountable. Christian community can be used by God to challenge us to take a deeper look at our convictional beliefs, especially when we can draw on the resources of Christians who are mature in their thinking and living of Scripture to a variety of situations and issues over its two-thousand-year history.

A Christian worldview should remind us of our multifaceted dependence on God’s goodness, which should foster humility within us. Thus, humility is an important indicator of whether we are progressing toward conformity with God’s story. (Also,) it is all too common to find Christians who possess the intellectual beliefs that should lead to lives marked by these attributes, but these operate only on the level of what we have called confessional beliefs. They know the right answers. They just don’t live as if they do. These confessional beliefs never become true convictions that correspond to actions and attitudes such as gratitude, humility, and love. The focal point of a Christian worldview is not to develop abundant intellect (although the rewards of this should not be understated) but to live an abundant life. In the end, then, the effort invested in a worldview is aimed at experiencing the abundance God intends for each and every aspect of our lives.”

Background Information

5.1 Background Information

Write a one-half to one-page reflection paper (Word document) reflecting on the sentence from the above reading: “The focal point of a Christian worldview is not to develop abundant intellect (although the rewards of this should not be understated) but to live an abundant life.” Do you believe you live an abundant life? If so, how would you describe that? If not, what would living an abundant life look like for you?

Getting Started

This week’s devotion begins with

reading a short summarized section of co

authors Steve Wilkens and Mark Sanford’s book, entitled

Hidden

Worldviews

(2009, pp. 209

218):

In the reading below, the authors

articulated four pillars for which a Christian worldview can be founded. The

Bible i

s the first, as it serves as the foundation for the faith. Second is

reason because God gifted us with minds to use for understanding and

sharing. Third is experience. This pillar gives validity to the individual as

their life aligns with God’s Word. Final

ly, the fourth pillar is tradition. This

gives us comfort that we are both connected to our past as humans and

hope for our race in the future.

“Evaluation of our deepest convictions and the stories that shape our beliefs

is of critical importance. Such an

examination is not possible without a set of

tools that allows us to be intentional about this process. Since worldview

examination is an ongoing project, you will also need some of these

evaluative instruments:

Expand all

Scripture

The first and primary

criterion of truth is Scripture. It is the foundation of a

Christian worldview. The Bible’s narrative about God’s involvement with his

world provides trustworthy and foundational truths about human nature,

about God’s nature and about God’s activity in our

lives (both the present

life and the afterlife). At the focal point of God’s engagement with his

creation, we find Jesus, God in full humanity, whose life, teachings, death

and resurrection illuminate our understanding of God and ourselves. While

the Bibl

e proclaims that God is the author of all truth, that he has revealed

his truth and that his truth is knowable, it makes no claim to provide

exhaustive truth. It will not tell you tomorrow’s high and low temperatures,

how to pick a lock on a bank vault or

how to surgically repair a torn rotator

cuff. Moreover, even its information on spiritual matters is incomplete.

Details about the afterlife are certainly sketchy, and Scripture itself tells us

that most of Jesus’ activity and teaching is not contained wit

hin its pages

(John 21:25). Nevertheless, a Christian worldview asserts that Scripture

provides true and sufficient knowledge of God, his creation, our nature and

purpose, and how we enter into and grow in our relationship to God. In

short, Scripture is th

e first place we look and the final court of appeal in

shaping a Christian worldview.

Getting Started

This week’s devotion begins with reading a short summarized section of co-

authors Steve Wilkens and Mark Sanford’s book, entitled Hidden

Worldviews (2009, pp. 209-218): In the reading below, the authors

articulated four pillars for which a Christian worldview can be founded. The

Bible is the first, as it serves as the foundation for the faith. Second is

reason because God gifted us with minds to use for understanding and

sharing. Third is experience. This pillar gives validity to the individual as

their life aligns with God’s Word. Finally, the fourth pillar is tradition. This

gives us comfort that we are both connected to our past as humans and

hope for our race in the future.

“Evaluation of our deepest convictions and the stories that shape our beliefs

is of critical importance. Such an examination is not possible without a set of

tools that allows us to be intentional about this process. Since worldview

examination is an ongoing project, you will also need some of these

evaluative instruments:

Expand all

Scripture

The first and primary criterion of truth is Scripture. It is the foundation of a

Christian worldview. The Bible’s narrative about God’s involvement with his

world provides trustworthy and foundational truths about human nature,

about God’s nature and about God’s activity in our lives (both the present

life and the afterlife). At the focal point of God’s engagement with his

creation, we find Jesus, God in full humanity, whose life, teachings, death

and resurrection illuminate our understanding of God and ourselves. While

the Bible proclaims that God is the author of all truth, that he has revealed

his truth and that his truth is knowable, it makes no claim to provide

exhaustive truth. It will not tell you tomorrow’s high and low temperatures,

how to pick a lock on a bank vault or how to surgically repair a torn rotator

cuff. Moreover, even its information on spiritual matters is incomplete.

Details about the afterlife are certainly sketchy, and Scripture itself tells us

that most of Jesus’ activity and teaching is not contained within its pages

(John 21:25). Nevertheless, a Christian worldview asserts that Scripture

provides true and sufficient knowledge of God, his creation, our nature and

purpose, and how we enter into and grow in our relationship to God. In

short, Scripture is the first place we look and the final court of appeal in

shaping a Christian worldview.

Getting Started

This assignment represents the culmination of work you began in the third week of this course ( Assignment 3.4(new tab) ). In that workshop, you submitted a set of questions for your Leader2Leader Dialogue. If you have not already conducted that conversation, you will need to do so during this week so that you may submit your report by Day 7 of the workshop.

As a reminder, for this assignment, you will engage a leader of your choosing as you conduct a Leader2Leader dialogue. Taking into consideration what you have studied thus far about leading, you will your list of conversation questions to gain new insights and perspectives on how someone else practices leadership. You’ve read from textbooks and articles. You’ve discussed these topics with your peers. Now, further insights might be gained by dialogues with key leaders in your life. Do they agree with some of the frameworks, principles, and practices you’ve been studying? Disagree? Have additional insights they might offer? What have they learned from their experiences in the areas you have been studying?

Leader2Leader Assignment flow chart

Background Information

An important part of leadership development is acquiring perspectives outside of a textbook. Throughout your program, you will be encouraged to glean insights or perspectives from a variety of external leaders. Beginning with this first course in your program, you have been encouraged to identify some leaders with whom you can hold a brief discussion (30 minutes or less). You should not just use the same leader for each course, but you should consider a variety of individuals from whom you might learn during the program (e.g., direct supervisor, other level leaders in your organization (or other organizations with which you are familiar), a pastor/religious leader, head of a charity, local business person) in order to generate a variety of perspectives. Select one of those leaders in your life for your Leader2Leader dialogue in this course. Consider which one might have the most relevant insights for the topics you have been studying.

1. Review the following videos to glean insights into how to best conduct your interview:

a. Katie Couric on How to Conduct a Good Interview(new tab)

b. Four Tips for an Effective Interview: A StoryCorps Education Tool(new tab)

2. Write a two- to three-page executive summary, including your approved questions from Assignment 3.4, that contains the following:

2. Name and title of the interviewee (who you will have your Leader2Leader dialogue with). Explain why you chose this particular leader.

2. Date, time, and method (phone, Zoom, Skype, FaceTime…) when the interview was conducted

1. Include in your executive summary your set of 7-10 questions from Assignment 3.4. Please remember that:

3. Questions should not be simple “Yes” – “No” questions but should allow the leader you selected to provide thoughtful explanations that will contribute to your understanding of the topic.

3. Questions should display variety, not focusing on one or two topics. Be sure to take time to review what you have learned this week and during the earlier workshops. Note: When you write your executive summary, clearly connect each question to a principle represented in the course material.

3. Keep in mind the dialogue should be 30 minutes or less. So, you may not have time to ask all the questions you develop. Consider how you arrange or outline the questions. What flow exists between the questions? What ones are the most essential? What ones might serve as follow-up questions?

1. Incorporate into your paper your questions and summaries of interviewee responses, along with your reflections on those responses. Be sure to link your learning in this course to your conclusions, especially noting when your interviewee shared insights that supported or contradicted what you’ve learned.

1. Include a conclusion paragraph to your paper that provides a succinct summary of your interview and learning.

1. When you have completed your assignment, submit a copy using the Assignment submission link in Brightspace by the end of the workshop week.

1. All papers are to be written in accordance with APA Guidelines (7th ed.) including format guidelines. Papers must be logical, well organized, grammatically correct, and have correct spelling and sentence structure. Write in complete paragraphs of at least three sentences in length.

Getting Started

This ass

ignment represents the culmination of work you began in

the third week of this course (

Assignment 3.4

(new tab)

). In that

workshop, you submitted a set of questions for your

Leader2Leader Dialogue. If you have not already conducted that

conversation, you will need to do so during this week so that you

may submit your report by Day 7 of the workshop.

As a reminder,

for this assignment, you will engage a leader of

your choosing as you conduct a Leader2Leader dialogue. Taking

into consideration what you have studied thus far about leading,

you will your list of conversation questions to gain new insights

and perspectiv

es on how someone else practices leadership.

You’ve read from textbooks and articles. You’ve discussed these

topics with your peers. Now, further insights might be gained by

dialogues with key leaders in your life. Do they agree with some of

the frameworks

, principles, and practices you’ve been studying?

Disagree? Have additional insights they might offer? What have

they learned from their experiences in the areas you have been

studying?

Background Information

An important part of leadership development

is acquiring

perspectives outside of a textbook. Throughout your program, you

will be encouraged to glean insights or perspectives from a variety

of external leaders. Beginning with this first course in your

program, you have been encouraged to identify s

ome leaders with

whom you can hold a brief discussion (30 minutes or less). You

should not just use the same leader for each course, but you

should consider a variety of individuals from whom you might

learn during the program (e.g., direct supervisor, oth

er level

leaders in your organization (or other organizations with which you

Getting Started

This assignment represents the culmination of work you began in

the third week of this course (Assignment 3.4(new tab)). In that

workshop, you submitted a set of questions for your

Leader2Leader Dialogue. If you have not already conducted that

conversation, you will need to do so during this week so that you

may submit your report by Day 7 of the workshop.

As a reminder, for this assignment, you will engage a leader of

your choosing as you conduct a Leader2Leader dialogue. Taking

into consideration what you have studied thus far about leading,

you will your list of conversation questions to gain new insights

and perspectives on how someone else practices leadership.

You’ve read from textbooks and articles. You’ve discussed these

topics with your peers. Now, further insights might be gained by

dialogues with key leaders in your life. Do they agree with some of

the frameworks, principles, and practices you’ve been studying?

Disagree? Have additional insights they might offer? What have

they learned from their experiences in the areas you have been

studying?

Background Information

An important part of leadership development is acquiring

perspectives outside of a textbook. Throughout your program, you

will be encouraged to glean insights or perspectives from a variety

of external leaders. Beginning with this first course in your

program, you have been encouraged to identify some leaders with

whom you can hold a brief discussion (30 minutes or less). You

should not just use the same leader for each course, but you

should consider a variety of individuals from whom you might

learn during the program (e.g., direct supervisor, other level

leaders in your organization (or other organizations with which you

Background Information

This website,  Can You Detect Weak Arguments?(new tab)  is an optional resource, but recommended.

Instructions

1. Watch the John Lennox’ question and answer session: ‘Are God and Faith Anti-Science and Anti-Reason?’  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GSu3p3wvtrs(new site)

2. Utilizing your learning from this and previous courses in your program, write a (full) four-page paper that addresses each of the following three topics:

a. Explore your understanding of worldviews and how they shape one’s perspectives on how the world works. Be sure to address the importance of cohesiveness in one’s worldview.

b. Discuss how a leader’s worldview influences decision-making and problem-solving capabilities. Be specific.

c. Include in a third section of your paper a discussion of your worldview and how you arrived at it. Provide example(s) of how your worldview has shaped decisions you have made.

4. Paper must be written in third person voice in addressing the first two topics above. Since the third topic is reflective in nature, first person voice may be used.

5. Prepare a separate title page and reference page.

6. Be sure to include a solid introduction and conclusion to your paper.

7. Incorporate no less than six references as sources on which to build your paper. At least four of these must come from sources outside of assigned course readings/viewings.

Background Information

This website,

Can You Detect Weak Arguments?

(new tab)

is an

optional resource, but recommended.

Instructions

1.

Watch the John Lennox’ question and answer session: ‘Are

God and Faith Anti

Science and Anti

Reason?’

(

new site)

2.

Utilizing your learning from this and previous courses in your

program, write a (full) four

page paper that addresses each

of the following three topics:

a.

Explore your understanding of worldviews and how

they shape one’s perspectives on how the world works.

Be sure to address the importance of cohesiveness in

one’s worldview.

b.

Discuss how a leader’s worldview influences decision

making and problem

solving cap

abilities. Be specific.

c.

Include in a third section of your paper a discussion of

your worldview and how you arrived at it. Provide

example(s) of how your worldview has shaped

decisions you have made.

4.

Paper must be written in third person voice in addressin

g the

first two topics above. Since the third topic is reflective in

nature, first person voice may be used.

5.

Prepare a separate title page and reference page.

6.

Be sure to include a solid introduction and conclusion to your

paper.

7.

Incorporate no less than si

x references as sources on which

to build your paper. At least four of these must come from

sources outside of assigned course readings/viewings.

Background Information

This website, Can You Detect Weak Arguments?(new tab) is an

optional resource, but recommended.

Instructions

1. Watch the John Lennox’ question and answer session: ‘Are

God and Faith Anti-Science and Anti-

Reason?’ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GSu3p3wvtrs(

new site)

2. Utilizing your learning from this and previous courses in your

program, write a (full) four-page paper that addresses each

of the following three topics:

a. Explore your understanding of worldviews and how

they shape one’s perspectives on how the world works.

Be sure to address the importance of cohesiveness in

one’s worldview.

b. Discuss how a leader’s worldview influences decision-

making and problem-solving capabilities. Be specific.

c. Include in a third section of your paper a discussion of

your worldview and how you arrived at it. Provide

example(s) of how your worldview has shaped

decisions you have made.

4. Paper must be written in third person voice in addressing the

first two topics above. Since the third topic is reflective in

nature, first person voice may be used.

5. Prepare a separate title page and reference page.

6. Be sure to include a solid introduction and conclusion to your

paper.

7. Incorporate no less than six references as sources on which

to build your paper. At least four of these must come from

sources outside of assigned course readings/viewings.

Getting Started

The Greek philosopher Socrates is often credited with having said that the unexamined life is not worth living. What did he mean by that? Typically, the examined life is considered to be a life that is characterized by self- reflection about one’s morals. Simply put, Socrates is making the point that if individuals do not take the time to consider their personal moral standing that their lives are of little use to anyone.

To that end, and for this final devotion, we have two short videos to view. The first provides an excellent opportunity to reflect upon our learning about relativism and truth. That leads to the second video that asks the very important question: “Are you living the examined life?”

Background Information

As we conclude this final week of the course, please take a moment to read this Franciscan Blessing, a final devotional thought as you progress in this program:

May God bless you with a restless discomfort about easy answers, half-truths and superficial relationships, so that you may seek truth boldly and love deep within your heart. 

May God bless you with holy anger at injustice, oppression, and exploitation of people, so that you may tirelessly work for justice, freedom, and peace among all people.

May God bless you with the gift of tears to shed with those who suffer from pain, rejection, starvation, or the loss of all that they cherish, so that you may reach out your hand to comfort them and transform their pain into joy.

May God bless you with enough foolishness to believe that you really CAN make a difference in this world, so that you are able, with God’s grace, to do what others claim cannot be done.

Instructions

1. Watch both of the short videos:

a. Reasonable Answers to “Your Truth is not My Truth”(new tab)

b. Are You Living the Examined Life?(new tab)

2. Write a one-half to one page reflection paper (Word document) that shares your key takeaways from the assigned videos. Consider the extent to which you have examined your own life. Is it important to you to examine your life? Why or why not? What steps might you take to better understand your worldview and your basis for the morals and ethics by which you live your life?

Getting Started

The Greek philosopher Socrates is often credited with having said

that the unexamined life is not worth living. What did he mean by

that? Typically, the examined life is considered to be a life that is

characterized by self

reflection about one’s morals.

Simply put,

Socrates is making the point that if individuals do not take the

time to consider their personal moral standing that their lives are

of little use to anyone.

To that end, and for this final devotion, we have two short videos

to view. The first

provides an excellent opportunity to reflect upon

our learning about relativism and truth. That leads to the second

video that asks the very important question: “Are you living the

examined life?”

Background Information

As we conclude this final week of t

he course, please take a

moment to read this Franciscan Blessing, a final devotional

thought as you progress in this program:

May God bless you with a restless discomfort

about easy answers,

half

truths and superficial relationships, so that you may seek

t

ruth boldly and love deep within your heart.

May God bless you with holy anger at injustice, oppression, and

exploitation of people, so that you may tirelessly work for justice,

freedom, and peace among all people.

May God bless you with the gift of tears

to shed with those who

suffer from pain, rejection, starvation, or the loss of all that they

cherish, so that you may reach out your hand to comfort them and

transform their pain into joy.

May God bless you with enough foolishness to believe that you

real

ly CAN make a difference in this world, so that you are able,

with God’s grace, to do what others claim cannot be done.

Getting Started

The Greek philosopher Socrates is often credited with having said

that the unexamined life is not worth living. What did he mean by

that? Typically, the examined life is considered to be a life that is

characterized by self- reflection about one’s morals. Simply put,

Socrates is making the point that if individuals do not take the

time to consider their personal moral standing that their lives are

of little use to anyone.

To that end, and for this final devotion, we have two short videos

to view. The first provides an excellent opportunity to reflect upon

our learning about relativism and truth. That leads to the second

video that asks the very important question: “Are you living the

examined life?”

Background Information

As we conclude this final week of the course, please take a

moment to read this Franciscan Blessing, a final devotional

thought as you progress in this program:

May God bless you with a restless discomfort about easy answers,

half-truths and superficial relationships, so that you may seek

truth boldly and love deep within your heart.

May God bless you with holy anger at injustice, oppression, and

exploitation of people, so that you may tirelessly work for justice,

freedom, and peace among all people.

May God bless you with the gift of tears to shed with those who

suffer from pain, rejection, starvation, or the loss of all that they

cherish, so that you may reach out your hand to comfort them and

transform their pain into joy.

May God bless you with enough foolishness to believe that you

really CAN make a difference in this world, so that you are able,

with God’s grace, to do what others claim cannot be done.

Getting Started

The LDR-260 Course Project provides an opportunity to demonstrate your critical thinking skills through the development of an Argument Analysis Template. This represents one more valuable tool to add to your leader toolkit! This key assignment begins with your selection of a reasonably complex topic for which there are at least two different perspectives/opinions. Feel free to choose whatever interests you; if you choose a political topic, however, be careful to avoid over-politicizing your points. Take advantage of what you have learned about bias in this course thus far to avoid making unsupported arguments.

No doubt, you’ve heard and/or read much about the lack of civility that seems to have become pervasive in our society these days. “Americans have reached a point where ignorance, especially of anything related to public policy, is an actual virtue,” the scholar Tom Nichols wrote in his book, The Death of Expertise (2017, p. 218). A 2018 New York Times review of the book, suggested that “this is part of a larger wave of anti-rationalism that has been accelerating for years — manifested in the growing ascendancy of emotion over reason in public debates, the blurring of lines among fact and opinion and lies, and denialism in the face of scientific findings…” 

Can you think of examples of irrational thinking in our society, in our world, today?

Once you have decided upon a topic, use the following template (Halpern, 2014, pp. 260-261) to carefully work through an analysis of your argument. You may choose to present your analysis as a paper or a PowerPoint presentation. Be sure to address all eight points in the template. Then, rate the overall strength of your topic/argument. Note that the example given in the  Analyzing Arguments Template(Word document)  is to be replaced with the topic of your choosing.

Background Information

What does one believe these days? Do we base our decisions solely on our own personal experiences? If so, what about those issues with which we have little exposure or experience? Do we rely solely on “following the science?” Often, science is useful in decision-making, but science is limited only to that which is quantifiable. Some things in life may extend beyond that. And what do we make of science that becomes politicized? As leaders, a major responsibility we assume in that role is to make the best possible decisions based on the information available to us. That means that we cannot afford to rely solely on source of information or, if we do so, we must have a very solid reason for doing so. Few skills will be more useful to you than the ability to think critically in ways that enhance problem-solving and decision making.

Instructions

1. Review the assigned  MIT Sloan article(new tab) .

2. Briefly review the  Retraction Watch(new tab)  website to gain perspective on the quality (or lack thereof) of some research.

3. Review the Paul and Elder text, as needed.

4. Using the Analyzing Arguments Template here, thoughtfully select a reasonably complex topic for which there are at least two different perspectives/opinions. Examples of topics chosen by past students: Should college athletes be paid? Should marijuana be legalized nationally? Should children attend school year-round? Caution: Avoid being overly political! Discourse must be civil and respectful.

5. Once you have decided upon a topic, respond to the questions posed (complete Item #1 last) in the template in writing or as a PowerPoint presentation by carefully working through an analysis of your argument. Be sure to address all eight points in the template, plus a concluding reflection as described.

6. Finally, rate the overall strength of your topic/argument in a paragraph or slide to conclude the assignment.

7. Since this assignment is reflective in nature, first-person voice may be used.

8. Prepare a separate title page/slide and reference page/slide.

9. Incorporate no less than six references as sources on which to build your submission. At least four of these must come from sources outside of assigned course readings/viewings.

10. Submit your assignment by the end of the workshop.

Getting Started

The LDR

260 Co

urse Project provides an opportunity to

demonstrate your critical thinking skills through the development

of an Argument Analysis Template. This represents one more

valuable tool to add to your leader toolkit! This key assignment

begins with your selection

of a reasonably complex topic for which

there are at least two different perspectives/opinions. Feel free to

choose whatever interests you; if you choose a political topic,

however, be careful to avoid over

politicizing your points. Take

advantage of what

you have learned about bias in this course thus

far to avoid making unsupported arguments.

No doubt, you’ve heard and/or read much about the lack of civility

that seems to have become pervasive in our society these days.

“Americans have reached a point wh

ere ignorance, especially of

anything related to public policy, is an actual virtue,” the scholar

Tom Nichols wrote in his book,

The Death of Expertise

(2017, p.

218). A 2018 New York Times review of the book, suggested that

“this is part of a larger wave

of anti

rationalism that has been

accelerating for years

manifested in the growing ascendancy of

emotion over reason in public debates, the blurring of lines among

fact and opinion and lies, and denialism in the face of scientific

findings…”

Can you thi

nk of examples of irrational thinking in our society, in

our world, today?

Once you have decided upon a topic, use the following template

(Halpern, 2014, pp. 260

261) to carefully work through an

analysis of your argument. You may choose to present your

an

alysis as a paper or a PowerPoint presentation. Be sure to

address all eight points in the template. Then, rate the overall

strength of your topic/argument. Note that the example given in

the

Analyzing Arguments Template

(Word document)

is to be

replaced with the topic of your choosing.

Background Information

What does one believe

these days? Do we base our decisions

solely on our own personal experiences? If so, what about those

issues with which we have little exposure or experience? Do we

rely solely on “following the science?” Often, science is useful in

Getting Started

The LDR-260 Course Project provides an opportunity to

demonstrate your critical thinking skills through the development

of an Argument Analysis Template. This represents one more

valuable tool to add to your leader toolkit! This key assignment

begins with your selection of a reasonably complex topic for which

there are at least two different perspectives/opinions. Feel free to

choose whatever interests you; if you choose a political topic,

however, be careful to avoid over-politicizing your points. Take

advantage of what you have learned about bias in this course thus

far to avoid making unsupported arguments.

No doubt, you’ve heard and/or read much about the lack of civility

that seems to have become pervasive in our society these days.

“Americans have reached a point where ignorance, especially of

anything related to public policy, is an actual virtue,” the scholar

Tom Nichols wrote in his book, The Death of Expertise (2017, p.

218). A 2018 New York Times review of the book, suggested that

“this is part of a larger wave of anti-rationalism that has been

accelerating for years — manifested in the growing ascendancy of

emotion over reason in public debates, the blurring of lines among

fact and opinion and lies, and denialism in the face of scientific

findings…”

Can you think of examples of irrational thinking in our society, in

our world, today?

Once you have decided upon a topic, use the following template

(Halpern, 2014, pp. 260-261) to carefully work through an

analysis of your argument. You may choose to present your

analysis as a paper or a PowerPoint presentation. Be sure to

address all eight points in the template. Then, rate the overall

strength of your topic/argument. Note that the example given in

the Analyzing Arguments Template(Word document) is to be

replaced with the topic of your choosing.

Background Information

What does one believe these days? Do we base our decisions

solely on our own personal experiences? If so, what about those

issues with which we have little exposure or experience? Do we

rely solely on “following the science?” Often, science is useful in

Getting Started

The LDR-260 Course Project provides an opportunity to demonstrate your critical thinking skills through the development of an Argument Analysis Template. This represents one more valuable tool to add to your leader toolkit! This key assignment begins with your selection of a reasonably complex topic for which there are at least two different perspectives/opinions. Feel free to choose whatever interests you; if you choose a political topic, however, be careful to avoid over-politicizing your points. Take advantage of what you have learned about bias in this course thus far to avoid making unsupported arguments.

No doubt, you’ve heard and/or read much about the lack of civility that seems to have become pervasive in our society these days. “Americans have reached a point where ignorance, especially of anything related to public policy, is an actual virtue,” the scholar Tom Nichols wrote in his book, The Death of Expertise (2017, p. 218). A 2018 New York Times review of the book, suggested that “this is part of a larger wave of anti-rationalism that has been accelerating for years — manifested in the growing ascendancy of emotion over reason in public debates, the blurring of lines among fact and opinion and lies, and denialism in the face of scientific findings…”

Can you think of examples of irrational thinking in our society, in our world, today?

Once you have decided upon a topic, use the following template (Halpern, 2014, pp. 260-261) to carefully work through an analysis of your argument. You may choose to present your analysis as a paper or a PowerPoint presentation. Be sure to address all eight points in the template. Then, rate the overall strength of your topic/argument. Note that the example given in the Analyzing Arguments Template(Word document) is to be replaced with the topic of your choosing.

Background Information

What does one believe these days? Do we base our decisions solely on our own personal experiences? If so, what about those issues with which we have little exposure or experience? Do we rely solely on “following the science?” Often, science is useful in decision-making, but science is limited only to that which is quantifiable. Some things in life may extend beyond that. And what do we make of science that becomes politicized? As leaders, a major responsibility we assume in that role is to make the best possible decisions based on the information available to us. That means that we cannot afford to rely solely on source of information or, if we do so, we must have a very solid reason for doing so. Few skills will be more useful to you than the ability to think critically in ways that enhance problem-solving and decision making.

Instructions

  1. Review the assigned MIT Sloan article(new tab) .
  2. Briefly review the Retraction Watch(new tab) website to gain perspective on the quality (or lack thereof) of some research.
  3. Review the Paul and Elder text, as needed.
  4. Using the Analyzing Arguments Template here, thoughtfully select a reasonably complex topic for which there are at least two different perspectives/opinions. Examples of topics chosen by past students: Should college athletes be paid? Should marijuana be legalized nationally? Should children attend school year-round? Caution: Avoid being overly political! Discourse must be civil and respectful.
  5. Once you have decided upon a topic, respond to the questions posed (complete Item #1 last) in the template in writing or as a PowerPoint presentation by carefully working through an analysis of your argument. Be sure to address all eight points in the template, plus a concluding reflection as described.
  6. Finally, rate the overall strength of your topic/argument in a paragraph or slide to conclude the assignment.
  7. Since this assignment is reflective in nature, first-person voice may be used.
  8. Prepare a separate title page/slide and reference page/slide.
  9. Incorporate no less than six references as sources on which to build your submission. At least four of these must come from sources outside of assigned course readings/viewings.
  10. Submit your assignment by the end of the workshop.

Getting Started

The LDR

260 Co

urse Project provides an opportunity to

demonstrate your critical thinking skills through the development

of an Argument Analysis Template. This represents one more

valuable tool to add to your leader toolkit! This key assignment

begins with your selection

of a reasonably complex topic for which

there are at least two different perspectives/opinions. Feel free to

choose whatever interests you; if you choose a political topic,

however, be careful to avoid over

politicizing your points. Take

advantage of what

you have learned about bias in this course thus

far to avoid making unsupported arguments.

No doubt, you’ve heard and/or read much about the lack of civility

that seems to have become pervasive in our society these days.

“Americans have reached a point wh

ere ignorance, especially of

anything related to public policy, is an actual virtue,” the scholar

Tom Nichols wrote in his book,

The Death of Expertise

(2017, p.

218). A 2018 New York Times review of the book, suggested that

“this is part of a larger wave

of anti

rationalism that has been

accelerating for years

manifested in the growing ascendancy of

emotion over reason in public debates, the blurring of lines among

fact and opinion and lies, and denialism in the face of scientific

findings…”

Can you thi

nk of examples of irrational thinking in our society, in

our world, today?

Once you have decided upon a topic, use the following template

(Halpern, 2014, pp. 260

261) to carefully work through an

analysis of your argument. You may choose to present your

an

alysis as a paper or a PowerPoint presentation. Be sure to

address all eight points in the template. Then, rate the overall

strength of your topic/argument. Note that the example given in

the

Analyzing Arguments Template

(Word document)

is to be

replaced with the topic of your choosing.

Background Information

What does one believe

these days? Do we base our decisions

solely on our own personal experiences? If so, what about those

issues with which we have little exposure or experience? Do we

rely solely on “following the science?” Often, science is useful in

Getting Started

The LDR-260 Course Project provides an opportunity to

demonstrate your critical thinking skills through the development

of an Argument Analysis Template. This represents one more

valuable tool to add to your leader toolkit! This key assignment

begins with your selection of a reasonably complex topic for which

there are at least two different perspectives/opinions. Feel free to

choose whatever interests you; if you choose a political topic,

however, be careful to avoid over-politicizing your points. Take

advantage of what you have learned about bias in this course thus

far to avoid making unsupported arguments.

No doubt, you’ve heard and/or read much about the lack of civility

that seems to have become pervasive in our society these days.

“Americans have reached a point where ignorance, especially of

anything related to public policy, is an actual virtue,” the scholar

Tom Nichols wrote in his book, The Death of Expertise (2017, p.

218). A 2018 New York Times review of the book, suggested that

“this is part of a larger wave of anti-rationalism that has been

accelerating for years — manifested in the growing ascendancy of

emotion over reason in public debates, the blurring of lines among

fact and opinion and lies, and denialism in the face of scientific

findings…”

Can you think of examples of irrational thinking in our society, in

our world, today?

Once you have decided upon a topic, use the following template

(Halpern, 2014, pp. 260-261) to carefully work through an

analysis of your argument. You may choose to present your

analysis as a paper or a PowerPoint presentation. Be sure to

address all eight points in the template. Then, rate the overall

strength of your topic/argument. Note that the example given in

the Analyzing Arguments Template(Word document) is to be

replaced with the topic of your choosing.

Background Information

What does one believe these days? Do we base our decisions

solely on our own personal experiences? If so, what about those

issues with which we have little exposure or experience? Do we

rely solely on “following the science?” Often, science is useful in

Getting Started

As was discussed in your previous course, an important aspect of leading is reflecting. Having conducted your Leader2Leadership Dialogue and filed your report, you will now share your report with others in this forum. This provides the benefit of learning from your peers’ reflections as you engage in a thoughtful discussion around the Leader2Leader activity. You will need your Leader2Leader Dialogue Report, as submitted for Assignment 5.2.

Leader2Leader Assignment flow chart

Instructions

1. For your initial posting, upload your Leader2Leader Report as a file attachment into this discussion forum. Do not copy and paste the report into the discussion space (due to length).

2. Write a very short, 50–100 word post to accompany your uploaded file, simply identifying a few of the major themes your interview revealed. This posting is due by the end of the second day of the workshop. 

3. Read, reflect upon, and respond to at least three of your classmates’ postings, as well as any follow-up instructor questions directed at you, by the end of day seven of the workshop. Of course, feel free to review all of your classmate’s reports, as your time allows.

4. Each response post should be approximately 150–200 words.

Getting Started

As was discussed in your previous course, an important aspect of

leading is reflecting. Having conducted your Leader2Leadership

Dialogue and filed your report, you will now share your report with

others in this forum. This provides the benefit of learning

from

your peers’ reflections as you engage in a thoughtful discussion

around the Leader2Leader activity. You will need your

Leader2Leader Dialogue Report, as submitted for Assignment 5.2.

Instructions

1.

For your initial posting, upload your Leader2Leader Report as

a file attachment into this discussion forum.

Do

not

copy

and paste the report into the discussion space (due to

length).

2.

Write a very short, 50

100 word post to accompany your

uploaded file, simply identifying a few of the major themes

your interview revealed. This posting is due by the end of

the

secon

d

day of the workshop.

3.

Read, reflect upon, and respond to at least

three

of your

classmates’ postings, as well as any follow

up instructor

questions directed at you, by the end of day seven of the

workshop. Of course, feel free to review all of your

class

mate’s reports, as your time allows.

4.

Each response post should be approximately 150

200

words.

Getting Started

As was discussed in your previous course, an important aspect of

leading is reflecting. Having conducted your Leader2Leadership

Dialogue and filed your report, you will now share your report with

others in this forum. This provides the benefit of learning from

your peers’ reflections as you engage in a thoughtful discussion

around the Leader2Leader activity. You will need your

Leader2Leader Dialogue Report, as submitted for Assignment 5.2.

Instructions

1. For your initial posting, upload your Leader2Leader Report as

a file attachment into this discussion forum. Do not copy

and paste the report into the discussion space (due to

length).

2. Write a very short, 50–100 word post to accompany your

uploaded file, simply identifying a few of the major themes

your interview revealed. This posting is due by the end of

the second day of the workshop.

3. Read, reflect upon, and respond to at least three of your

classmates’ postings, as well as any follow-up instructor

questions directed at you, by the end of day seven of the

workshop. Of course, feel free to review all of your

classmate’s reports, as your time allows.

4. Each response post should be approximately 150–200

words.

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