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I have included the outline which you will write the paper on. Make sure to include information about The ABC-X models as well as write about the topic which is on the outline. PLEASE READ THE OUTLINE CAREFULLY

Autobiographical Crisis Outline and Paper

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 Outline = 20 points; Final Paper = 80 points; Total = 100 points total

 On or by the designated due date, submit an outline of the paper. See the outline example in the folder on the D2L homepage and evaluation/formatting instructions below.

 Identify an individual or family crisis experience in your life. You may be able to identify one immediately or you may have to give this some thought. Remember, a crisis experience is individual and unique for each person and family. If you don’t identify an experience immediately, reflect on your life’s experiences to this point. Think of times when you were impacted by a crisis, a major stressful event (negative or positive), or a significant change or transition.

 Once you’ve identified your topic, it’s time to “dissect” your experience into eight parts (A, B, C, X, AA, BB, CC, XX factors). Apply both Hill’s ABC-X and McCubbin’s Double ABC-X Models to examine and analyze your own individual and/or your family crisis experience. You will need to be knowledgeable about both models. Carefully read and re-read the corresponding chapter and Power Point on the models.

 Individual and family crisis experiences are often complex. Allow yourself enough time to develop the outline and, later, write a draft, set it aside for thought, and then resume work on a final draft. If you are finding it difficult to organize a step-by-step examination and analysis of the crisis, remind yourself – what is the major issue? – and stay focused on that as the central point as you develop the paper. There will likely be multiple issues in the complex layers of the experience – you are encouraged to include those in the writing, as well. Remember, the major issue should be central to best keep your paper well-focused and on track. In addition, most (if not all of you) will include discussion of other people (e.g., family, friends) in your paper. That’s perfectly fine and welcome. As you discuss the involvement of others in the crisis experience, keep in mind that you and your experience are the main points of focus (that’s what makes this an autobiography – you’re telling your own story).

 If help is needed with the assignment, please communicate with the professor. A serious and sincere approach to the paper is critical. Writing a paper about our own personal crisis experience helps us to become more skilled and sensitive as we prepare to work with individuals and families in crisis. When we better understand our crisis experiences, we work in a healthier and more effective manner with others in crisis.

 Writing about a personal crisis/trauma can be triggering in the form of painful memories or flashbacks. If you wish to write about a different experience (even after you’ve turned in the outline), that is acceptable. Your personal well-being is most important. Also, if you think/feel that seeking support for yourself is needed, here are resources for you and you may contact the professor for additional guidance and referrals.

o EIU Counseling Clinic, Human Services Bldg. 1st Floor, 217-581-3413 (Monday – Friday), 1-866- 567-2400 (After Hours Number);

o SACIS (Sexual Assault Counseling and Information Service), Charleston, IL, 217-348-5033 (Office) or 888-345-2846 (Hotline); and

o HOPE of East Central Illinois, Charleston, IL, 217-348-5931 (Office) or 888-345-3990 (Hotline).

 Include the following sub-headings to organize the Autobiographical Crisis Outline and Paper. Re- type these sub-headings exactly how they appear below. For the outline, the sub-headings will be followed by a phrase or a sentence or two. For the paper, the sub-headings will be followed by detailed paragraphs.

o Overview of Crisis Event o A Factor: Stressor Event o B Factor: Resources o C Factor: Perceptions o X Factor: Crisis Event o AA Factor: Post-Crisis Pile-Up Events o BB Factor: Post-Crisis Resources o CC Factor: Post-Crisis Perceptions o XX Factor: Post-Crisis Adaptation

 The paper will be evaluated on: 1) correct and analytical application of theoretical models; 2) the degree to which readings, class Power Points, and other materials are incorporated and reflected in the content; and 3) capacity to express oneself clearly and grammatically. Also refer to the Assessment of Written Work rubric in the D2L folder.

 For outline and paper formatting in APA style, visit https://apastyle.apa.org/ for information.

 Paper should be approximately 4- to 5- pages. Going over that length is acceptable, if you find it unavoidable.

 Submit the outline and the paper directly to the designated Assignment Drop Boxes by the assigned due dates for each.

 The professor respects and appreciates the highly personal nature of the paper. Strict confidentiality is guaranteed and no one other than the professor will read the outline and paper.https://apastyle.apa.org/

Ja’Mya Wilburn

Autobiographical Crisis

HSL 4845

10 October , 2021

Autobiographical Crisis Outline

Overview of Crisis Event

· Everyday discrimination has long-term effects that lead to depressive symptoms precisely among minorities.

· Being an African American female, it is common to come across various acts of discrimination, which requires moderation from having a social support system.

· In this case, it was evident that the major issues arose from the contact with as well as support from extended family along with friends caused a major problem.

· Lacking a relevant social support system from friends and family was a cause of depressive symptoms (Kumar & George, 2013).

· A positive connection existed between depression and the lack of social support from family and friends.

A Factor: Stressor Event

Social support stressor events often comprise of the following:

· Different life events that involve reliability on attachments with family and close relatives

· Having a relevant level of integration from friends

· The lack of teacher and parental figures served as identifiable stressors

· Religion is another form of stressor event that is variable especially when assessed from a social support point of view (Kumar & George, 2013).

· Different kinds of coping patterns ranging from attempters and controls present assorted variables that consist of suppression, replacement, blame, and help seeking.

· In the case of suicidal behavior, it is evident that life events along with psychological stressors played an important role in different kinds of attempts (Andrews et al., 1978).

B Factor: Resources

· The issue of lacking social support is best solved through an introduction of family integration

· Family integration is essential since it offers description of depth that an individual lives

· Through an involvement of family integration, it is possible to characterize the high degree associated with family organization.

· In this case, social activities were the main activities associated with the integration process.

· Social support systems require family integration because it addresses factors that include peer groups, friendship, in addition to social networks.

· The family integration resource identifies the importance of attachments involved with the peer groups, friendship, in addition to social networking (Kumar & George, 2013).

· Another ideal family crisis meeting resource applicable in social support is family adaptability.

· Family adaptability is the aptitude of family systems changing the power structure, role affiliations, in addition to relationship rules

· Changes in relationship rules may have been ideal in the issue of lacking social support as an African American.

· Development stress originates from an absence of different kinds of support at an individual level.

C Factor: Perceptions

· Hardships such as poor peer groups and the lack of significant friendship in crime inflicted neighborhood defined stressor events (McMahon, Felix, & Nagarajan, 2011).

· Family became crisis prone due to inappropriate family structures.

· The lack of family resources made it difficult to overcome certain conditions that triggered stressors such as depression.

· The social support system requires social networks to assist in overcoming any issues that may emerge in relation to family integration.

· The social environment is likely to make it difficult for an African American female to overcome certain challenges leading to social support as a family crisis.

X Factor: Crisis Event

· Shifting expectations at childhood due to lack of a significant social support system was the main crisis event.

· From an emotional point of view, it is evident that the crisis event associated with social supported resulted in issues aligned with empathy expressions, an absence of love, trust, as well as the nature of caring (Pickard et al., 2011).

· Based on instrumental aspects depending on social support, it was necessary to have access to tangible help as well as services being a minority (Muñoz-Laboy et al., 2014).

· During childhood, lacking social support caused informational crisis events that required advice, suggestions, as well as information to avoid any probable negative outcomes.

· The appraisal social support system is often affected by the lack of information that may be resourceful in self-evaluation to avoid falling into a depressive state.

aA Factor: Post-Crisis Pile-Up Events

· The hardships associated with initial stressors increasing and persisting over time transformed into chronic strains (McMahon, Felix, & Nagarajan, 2011).

· Transitions also presented astounding consequences as the different experiences from lacking a sufficient social support system persisted.

· The little effort to provide necessary support to assist with coping with the childhood strains are noteworthy post crisis pile ups as an African American.

· Society was responsible for demonstrating an unreliable level of ambiguity, despite the absence of significant support from family members and relatives.

· After the separation of parents, it became difficult to have a reliable form of social support system.

bB Factor: Post-Crisis Resources

· An introduction of mental health professional played an important part is addressing the negative outcomes of lacking social support as an African American

· Role flexibility is another example of a post-crisis resource that facilitated achievement of productive outcomes after the implications of the family crisis.

· From an individual point of view, it is notable that expressiveness provides a significant platform to solve the issues that developed after suffering from an absence of social support during childhood and growing up as an African American.

· Different resources were required to address life events along with psychological stressors that played an important role in different kinds of attempts.

cC Factor: Post-Crisis Perceptions

· The outcome of the social support crisis was positive, which meant that hardships such as poor peer groups and the lack of significant friendship had little effect on personal behavior during adulthood.

· The dearth for family resources made it difficult to overcome certain conditions that triggered stressors such as depression (Andrews et al., 1978).

· After the family became crisis prone, it was clear that adaptability was the aptitude of family systems changing the power structure.

· Coming to terms with the missing social support caused informational crisis events that required advice, suggestions, as well as information to avoid any probable negative outcomes (Muñoz-Laboy et al., 2014).

· It was encouraging to realize that social support systems depend on social networking to facilitate the ability of overcoming any issues that may emerge in relation to family integration.

XX Factor: Post-Crisis Adaptation

· During childhood, it was necessary to cope with the difficulties associated with lacking a reliable social support system.

· It was difficult expressing personal feelings towards available family members since each individual experienced an individual predicament.

· The intended outcome of the counseling sessions with professionals assisted with overcoming personal hardships.

· The ability to overcome various stressors developed from childhood depended on the idea of talking to professionals (Pickard et al., 2011).

· A number of limiting factors from levels such as member to family as well as family to community influenced the recurrent depressive issues during adulthood.

· Coming across various acts of discrimination was an inevitable outcome being an African American from a deprived community, which required moderation from having a social support system.

· The family integration approach was commendable since it helped address factors that include peer groups, friendship, in addition to social networks.

References

Andrews, G., Tennant, C., Hewson, D. M., & Vaillant, G. E. (1978). Life event stress, social support, coping style, and risk of psychological impairment. The Journal of nervous and mental disease166(5), 307–316. https://doi.org/10.1097/00005053-197805000-00001

Kumar, P. N., & George, B. (2013). Life events, social support, coping strategies, and quality of life in attempted suicide: A case-control study. Indian journal of psychiatry55(1), 46–51. https://doi.org/10.4103/0019-5545.105504

McMahon, S.D., Felix, E.D. & Nagarajan, T. (2011). Social Support and Neighborhood Stressors Among African American Youth: Networks and Relations to Self-Worth. J Child Fam Stud 20, 255–262. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10826-010-9386-3

Muñoz-Laboy, M., Severson, N., Perry, A., & Guilamo-Ramos, V. (2014). Differential Impact of Types of Social Support in the Mental Health of Formerly Incarcerated Latino Men. American Journal of Men’s Health, 226–239. https://doi.org/10.1177/1557988313508303

Pickard, J. G., Inoue, M., Chadiha, L. A., & Johnson, S. (2011). The Relationship of Social Support to African American Caregivers’ Help-Seeking for Emotional Problems. The Social service review85(2), 246–265. https://doi.org/10.1086/660068

Ja’Mya Wilburn

Autobiographical Crisis

HSL 4845

10 October , 2021

Autobiographical Crisis Outline

Overview of Crisis Event

· Everyday discrimination has long-term effects that lead to depressive symptoms precisely among minorities.

· Being an African American female, it is common to come across various acts of discrimination, which requires moderation from having a social support system.

· In this case, it was evident that the major issues arose from the contact with as well as support from extended family along with friends caused a major problem.

· Lacking a relevant social support system from friends and family was a cause of depressive symptoms (Kumar & George, 2013).

· A positive connection existed between depression and the lack of social support from family and friends.

A Factor: Stressor Event

Social support stressor events often comprise of the following:

· Different life events that involve reliability on attachments with family and close relatives

· Having a relevant level of integration from friends

· The lack of teacher and parental figures served as identifiable stressors

· Religion is another form of stressor event that is variable especially when assessed from a social support point of view (Kumar & George, 2013).

· Different kinds of coping patterns ranging from attempters and controls present assorted variables that consist of suppression, replacement, blame, and help seeking.

· In the case of suicidal behavior, it is evident that life events along with psychological stressors played an important role in different kinds of attempts (Andrews et al., 1978).

B Factor: Resources

· The issue of lacking social support is best solved through an introduction of family integration

· Family integration is essential since it offers description of depth that an individual lives

· Through an involvement of family integration, it is possible to characterize the high degree associated with family organization.

· In this case, social activities were the main activities associated with the integration process.

· Social support systems require family integration because it addresses factors that include peer groups, friendship, in addition to social networks.

· The family integration resource identifies the importance of attachments involved with the peer groups, friendship, in addition to social networking (Kumar & George, 2013).

· Another ideal family crisis meeting resource applicable in social support is family adaptability.

· Family adaptability is the aptitude of family systems changing the power structure, role affiliations, in addition to relationship rules

· Changes in relationship rules may have been ideal in the issue of lacking social support as an African American.

· Development stress originates from an absence of different kinds of support at an individual level.

C Factor: Perceptions

· Hardships such as poor peer groups and the lack of significant friendship in crime inflicted neighborhood defined stressor events (McMahon, Felix, & Nagarajan, 2011).

· Family became crisis prone due to inappropriate family structures.

· The lack of family resources made it difficult to overcome certain conditions that triggered stressors such as depression.

· The social support system requires social networks to assist in overcoming any issues that may emerge in relation to family integration.

· The social environment is likely to make it difficult for an African American female to overcome certain challenges leading to social support as a family crisis.

X Factor: Crisis Event

· Shifting expectations at childhood due to lack of a significant social support system was the main crisis event.

· From an emotional point of view, it is evident that the crisis event associated with social supported resulted in issues aligned with empathy expressions, an absence of love, trust, as well as the nature of caring (Pickard et al., 2011).

· Based on instrumental aspects depending on social support, it was necessary to have access to tangible help as well as services being a minority (Muñoz-Laboy et al., 2014).

· During childhood, lacking social support caused informational crisis events that required advice, suggestions, as well as information to avoid any probable negative outcomes.

· The appraisal social support system is often affected by the lack of information that may be resourceful in self-evaluation to avoid falling into a depressive state.

aA Factor: Post-Crisis Pile-Up Events

· The hardships associated with initial stressors increasing and persisting over time transformed into chronic strains (McMahon, Felix, & Nagarajan, 2011).

· Transitions also presented astounding consequences as the different experiences from lacking a sufficient social support system persisted.

· The little effort to provide necessary support to assist with coping with the childhood strains are noteworthy post crisis pile ups as an African American.

· Society was responsible for demonstrating an unreliable level of ambiguity, despite the absence of significant support from family members and relatives.

· After the separation of parents, it became difficult to have a reliable form of social support system.

bB Factor: Post-Crisis Resources

· An introduction of mental health professional played an important part is addressing the negative outcomes of lacking social support as an African American

· Role flexibility is another example of a post-crisis resource that facilitated achievement of productive outcomes after the implications of the family crisis.

· From an individual point of view, it is notable that expressiveness provides a significant platform to solve the issues that developed after suffering from an absence of social support during childhood and growing up as an African American.

· Different resources were required to address life events along with psychological stressors that played an important role in different kinds of attempts.

cC Factor: Post-Crisis Perceptions

· The outcome of the social support crisis was positive, which meant that hardships such as poor peer groups and the lack of significant friendship had little effect on personal behavior during adulthood.

· The dearth for family resources made it difficult to overcome certain conditions that triggered stressors such as depression (Andrews et al., 1978).

· After the family became crisis prone, it was clear that adaptability was the aptitude of family systems changing the power structure.

· Coming to terms with the missing social support caused informational crisis events that required advice, suggestions, as well as information to avoid any probable negative outcomes (Muñoz-Laboy et al., 2014).

· It was encouraging to realize that social support systems depend on social networking to facilitate the ability of overcoming any issues that may emerge in relation to family integration.

XX Factor: Post-Crisis Adaptation

· During childhood, it was necessary to cope with the difficulties associated with lacking a reliable social support system.

· It was difficult expressing personal feelings towards available family members since each individual experienced an individual predicament.

· The intended outcome of the counseling sessions with professionals assisted with overcoming personal hardships.

· The ability to overcome various stressors developed from childhood depended on the idea of talking to professionals (Pickard et al., 2011).

· A number of limiting factors from levels such as member to family as well as family to community influenced the recurrent depressive issues during adulthood.

· Coming across various acts of discrimination was an inevitable outcome being an African American from a deprived community, which required moderation from having a social support system.

· The family integration approach was commendable since it helped address factors that include peer groups, friendship, in addition to social networks.

References

Andrews, G., Tennant, C., Hewson, D. M., & Vaillant, G. E. (1978). Life event stress, social support, coping style, and risk of psychological impairment. The Journal of nervous and mental disease166(5), 307–316. https://doi.org/10.1097/00005053-197805000-00001

Kumar, P. N., & George, B. (2013). Life events, social support, coping strategies, and quality of life in attempted suicide: A case-control study. Indian journal of psychiatry55(1), 46–51. https://doi.org/10.4103/0019-5545.105504

McMahon, S.D., Felix, E.D. & Nagarajan, T. (2011). Social Support and Neighborhood Stressors Among African American Youth: Networks and Relations to Self-Worth. J Child Fam Stud 20, 255–262. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10826-010-9386-3

Muñoz-Laboy, M., Severson, N., Perry, A., & Guilamo-Ramos, V. (2014). Differential Impact of Types of Social Support in the Mental Health of Formerly Incarcerated Latino Men. American Journal of Men’s Health, 226–239. https://doi.org/10.1177/1557988313508303

Pickard, J. G., Inoue, M., Chadiha, L. A., & Johnson, S. (2011). The Relationship of Social Support to African American Caregivers’ Help-Seeking for Emotional Problems. The Social service review85(2), 246–265. https://doi.org/10.1086/660068

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