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Lab: attached files below

P/s: Need to attach pictures when doing experiment.

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Lab #: Lab Title (from the lab handout)

Author: Your Full Name Date Performed: Month, Day, Year Class: PHYS ### Section: ##### Group Members: Full Name of Member 1 Full Name of Member 2 Full Name of Member 3 Full Name of Member 4

Abstract The abstract is one paragraph describing the ultimate purpose, methods used, and results of the lab work. From the abstract, the reader should be able to understand what the lab is intended to measure, what significant measurements were taken, and what summary results (including numbers) were obtained. It is not a detailed description, but a terse overview. Essentially you are to sum up the whole lab in one paragraph in this section. The abstract is not about anticipated activities, but an account of the experiments after they have been conducted.

Theory This section of the report provides the theoretical context of the lab. Include theory that is relevant to the understanding of the lab experiments and the interpretation of the data. This section should look like a short encyclopedia entry on the topic of the lab and should include all the relevant equations (properly formatted). Use the textbook and other references to learn about the theory needed for the interpretation of your experimental results. Do not copy from the references or the handout; write in your own words instead. Do not provide a list of procedures that you followed and do not mention the results of the lab work or show calculations in this section. This is also not the place to include your thoughts about the lab or the results you obtained.

Measurements and Observations This section includes a thorough description of the experimental setup(s), procedures followed, and the raw data (quantitative and qualitative) obtained from measurement and observation. Diagrams/snapshots of the experimental setup(s) should be included here. Do not include too many diagrams/snapshots; be judicious in your choices. Numerical data should be presented in tabular form when appropriate. Tables should not be broken over multiple pages.

Data Analysis and Discussion All calculations related to the data and conclusions drawn from it should be outlined here, including calculations of percentage errors. For similar calculations, only include sample calculations. When appropriate or requested in the lab handout, include graphs of the data in this section. For all graphs, make sure you include titles, labeled axes with units, and the equations of curve-fits if they are used.

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In addition to the quantitative conclusions, also include a discussion regarding the nature and the significance of the results obtained. What were your fundamental conclusions from the lab experiment(s)? Were there any surprises or were the results as expected from theory? If the lab did not work out as it seems it should have, this is the place to discuss it. Why do you think it did not work out? What were the causes? How might you avoid the same problems in the future? When addressing these questions, do not simply provide one-sentence answers like “There were no surprises.” A thorough discussion is expected here.

The report must follow the above format and must be written in your own words, in complete sentences, and in paragraph form (not in list form). The report must be self-contained. This means that it should contain a thorough account of the experimental setup without need to refer to the lab handout. The lab report should also not read as if it is answering questions asked somewhere else. Do not copy from the lab handout and do not quote references. Write in your own words instead. Do not write the lab report as if you were asked (or forced) to carry out the lab activities. Use “we” instead of “I”. Do not use “student” or “students” to refer to yourself or your lab partners. Each section should contain multiple paragraphs of relevant content (except for the abstract which needs to be one paragraph). Avoid repetition and copying and pasting from one section into another. When including tables, graphs, and other figures, also include explanatory text to accompany these elements. Do not group tables, graphs, and other figures together; they should be integrated with the text and included where they need to be included. Also pay close attention to the formatting of the lab report, including typography, margins, spacing, and overall look. Finally, make sure the report is free of typos and grammatical errors. The lab report must be submitted on Canvas as one Word document (integrating all the tables, graphs, and other figures). As a SAC student, you have free access to Microsoft Office 365, which includes Word and Excel. The lab reports will be graded using a rubric. Make sure you read the rubric carefully for any additional requirements.https://rsccd.edu/Departments/Information-Technology-Services/Pages/Student-Email-Cloud.aspx

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Lab 3: Motion in an Electric Field

In this lab you will use PhET’s simulation Electric Field Hockey to study the motion of a charged

particle in the electric field produced by discrete charge distributions.

Note: Unlike previous simulations, this is not an HTML5 simulation. This means it might not work

on some browsers. Please try a different browser if the simulation does not start (after a little wait).

The path of motion of the charged puck depends on its mass (which you can change by using a

slider in the simulation), the initial conditions (the puck will always start from rest when you reset

the simulation), and the electric field. In this simulation we will produce the electric field using

point charges. The objective is to find a static charge distribution that makes the charged puck

move around the obstacle(s) and reach the goal. Static means you will not be moving the charges

that generate the electric field after you start the simulation.

1. Select the checkboxes for Trace and Field to visualize the path of motion of the charged

puck and the electric field.

2. Start with the Practice and a positively charged puck. What is the simplest solution to move

the puck and score a goal? Take a snapshot of the simulation showing that you scored a

goal. Explain the path of motion.

3. Now, select Difficulty level 1. Find a simple charge distribution that allows the puck to move

around the obstacle and into the goal. Take a snapshot of the simulation showing that you

scored a goal. Explain the path of motion. How do you need to modify your charges without

changing their positions to score a goal with a negatively charged puck? Test your

hypothesis.

4. Repeat the previous step for Difficulty levels 2 and 3 only with a positively charged puck.

Include your snapshots showing your successes (as well as a description of your failed attempts) in

the Measurements and Observations section of your report. Your explanations of the path of motion

of the puck should be included in the Data Analysis and Discussion section. Make sure you adhere to

other requirements of the lab report as well.simulation=electric-hockey“>https://phet.colorado.edu/sims/cheerpj/electric-hockey/latest/electric-hockey.html?simulation=electric-hockey

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Lab #: Lab Title (from the lab handout)

Author: Your Full Name Date Performed: Month, Day, Year Class: PHYS ### Section: ##### Group Members: Full Name of Member 1 Full Name of Member 2 Full Name of Member 3 Full Name of Member 4

Abstract The abstract is one paragraph describing the ultimate purpose, methods used, and results of the lab work. From the abstract, the reader should be able to understand what the lab is intended to measure, what significant measurements were taken, and what summary results (including numbers) were obtained. It is not a detailed description, but a terse overview. Essentially you are to sum up the whole lab in one paragraph in this section. The abstract is not about anticipated activities, but an account of the experiments after they have been conducted.

Theory This section of the report provides the theoretical context of the lab. Include theory that is relevant to the understanding of the lab experiments and the interpretation of the data. This section should look like a short encyclopedia entry on the topic of the lab and should include all the relevant equations (properly formatted). Use the textbook and other references to learn about the theory needed for the interpretation of your experimental results. Do not copy from the references or the handout; write in your own words instead. Do not provide a list of procedures that you followed and do not mention the results of the lab work or show calculations in this section. This is also not the place to include your thoughts about the lab or the results you obtained.

Measurements and Observations This section includes a thorough description of the experimental setup(s), procedures followed, and the raw data (quantitative and qualitative) obtained from measurement and observation. Diagrams/snapshots of the experimental setup(s) should be included here. Do not include too many diagrams/snapshots; be judicious in your choices. Numerical data should be presented in tabular form when appropriate. Tables should not be broken over multiple pages.

Data Analysis and Discussion All calculations related to the data and conclusions drawn from it should be outlined here, including calculations of percentage errors. For similar calculations, only include sample calculations. When appropriate or requested in the lab handout, include graphs of the data in this section. For all graphs, make sure you include titles, labeled axes with units, and the equations of curve-fits if they are used.

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In addition to the quantitative conclusions, also include a discussion regarding the nature and the significance of the results obtained. What were your fundamental conclusions from the lab experiment(s)? Were there any surprises or were the results as expected from theory? If the lab did not work out as it seems it should have, this is the place to discuss it. Why do you think it did not work out? What were the causes? How might you avoid the same problems in the future? When addressing these questions, do not simply provide one-sentence answers like “There were no surprises.” A thorough discussion is expected here.

The report must follow the above format and must be written in your own words, in complete sentences, and in paragraph form (not in list form). The report must be self-contained. This means that it should contain a thorough account of the experimental setup without need to refer to the lab handout. The lab report should also not read as if it is answering questions asked somewhere else. Do not copy from the lab handout and do not quote references. Write in your own words instead. Do not write the lab report as if you were asked (or forced) to carry out the lab activities. Use “we” instead of “I”. Do not use “student” or “students” to refer to yourself or your lab partners. Each section should contain multiple paragraphs of relevant content (except for the abstract which needs to be one paragraph). Avoid repetition and copying and pasting from one section into another. When including tables, graphs, and other figures, also include explanatory text to accompany these elements. Do not group tables, graphs, and other figures together; they should be integrated with the text and included where they need to be included. Also pay close attention to the formatting of the lab report, including typography, margins, spacing, and overall look. Finally, make sure the report is free of typos and grammatical errors. The lab report must be submitted on Canvas as one Word document (integrating all the tables, graphs, and other figures). As a SAC student, you have free access to Microsoft Office 365, which includes Word and Excel. The lab reports will be graded using a rubric. Make sure you read the rubric carefully for any additional requirements.https://rsccd.edu/Departments/Information-Technology-Services/Pages/Student-Email-Cloud.aspx

1/1

Lab 3: Motion in an Electric Field

In this lab you will use PhET’s simulation Electric Field Hockey to study the motion of a charged

particle in the electric field produced by discrete charge distributions.

Note: Unlike previous simulations, this is not an HTML5 simulation. This means it might not work

on some browsers. Please try a different browser if the simulation does not start (after a little wait).

The path of motion of the charged puck depends on its mass (which you can change by using a

slider in the simulation), the initial conditions (the puck will always start from rest when you reset

the simulation), and the electric field. In this simulation we will produce the electric field using

point charges. The objective is to find a static charge distribution that makes the charged puck

move around the obstacle(s) and reach the goal. Static means you will not be moving the charges

that generate the electric field after you start the simulation.

1. Select the checkboxes for Trace and Field to visualize the path of motion of the charged

puck and the electric field.

2. Start with the Practice and a positively charged puck. What is the simplest solution to move

the puck and score a goal? Take a snapshot of the simulation showing that you scored a

goal. Explain the path of motion.

3. Now, select Difficulty level 1. Find a simple charge distribution that allows the puck to move

around the obstacle and into the goal. Take a snapshot of the simulation showing that you

scored a goal. Explain the path of motion. How do you need to modify your charges without

changing their positions to score a goal with a negatively charged puck? Test your

hypothesis.

4. Repeat the previous step for Difficulty levels 2 and 3 only with a positively charged puck.

Include your snapshots showing your successes (as well as a description of your failed attempts) in

the Measurements and Observations section of your report. Your explanations of the path of motion

of the puck should be included in the Data Analysis and Discussion section. Make sure you adhere to

other requirements of the lab report as well.https://phet.colorado.edu/sims/cheerpj/electric-hockey/latest/electric-hockey.html?simulation=electric-hockey

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