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Attached is a article . Read the article and answer the questions attached . 

Kate Broadley

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Still failing at fairness: how gender bias cheats girls and boys in school

and what we can do about it

David Sadker, Myra Sadker & Karen Zittleman

The extent of gender bias in America’s education system is appalling, if the research and

anecdotes in Still failing at fairness are accurate. Sadker, Sadker and Kittleman explain

how gender stereotypes, sexism, and gender bias are prevalent at every level of

education, from kinder through to university. In 1994, the Sadker’s published the first

edition of this text Failing at fairness. While it is clear that gender bias is not as blatant in

classrooms as it was a decade ago, ‘Sexism is still a way of life in our schools… gender

equity progress in the last few years has slowed down for women; for men, it has barely

started’ (Sadker et al., 2009, p. 58).

Seven chapters describe how ‘gender bias short-circuits both boys and girls’ (Sadker et

al., 2009, p. 6); it is hard not to become dispirited when reading this text. A logical solution

to the entrenched gender-bias problem in coeducational schools is to educate students in

single-sex environments. The authors devote a chapter to this topic and are very

complimentary about the single-sex schools they visit. However, single-sex schooling is

not promoted as the panacea to gender bias. Sadker et al. are concerned about the

sudden interest in single-sex schooling in America since the changes to Title IX in 2006.

They warn that ‘the stampede to single-sex classes is causing a dust storm of confusion –

and maybe more than a little damage’ (2009, p. 284). This is a fair point, as with any

educational trend, the rush to implement new initiatives can mean the interests of students

are only a secondary consideration.

While the authors do not champion single-sex schooling, it is hard to read Still failing at

fairness without concluding that so much of the gender-bias that is presented would simply

not be found in single-sex schools. A recurring theme of gender bias in coeducational

settings is that boys ‘receive the lion’s share of teacher time and attention in class’ (Sadker

et al., 2009, p. 105).

Still failing at fairness presents a sobering picture of how boys and girls are suffering from

gender bias in American schools. Much of the research would be applicable to Australian

schools, although it is hard to believe that the Australian system is as bad as the scenarios

painted by the authors. At the end of each chapter, suggestions about how to ‘succeed at

fairness’ are listed. There are many practical ideas but they feel like a drop in the ocean.

Like David Chadwell’s A gendered choice, this text presents an interesting, well-

researched account of gender-bias in American schools. The authors are academics who

have extensive knowledge of the topic through their own studies and research. For

educators and parents in single-sex schools there is a certain level of comfort to be found

in reading Still failing at fairness. Despite the conclusions in the text, single-sex schools

Kate Broadley

are largely free of gender bias, which is one of the many benefits that girls will reap from

attending girls’ schools.

Sadker, D., Sadker, M., & Zittleman, K. (2009). Still failing at fairness: how gender bias cheats girls

and boys in schools and what we can do about it. New York: Scribner.

Article Questions

1. How narrowly is the research problem defined? In your opinion, is it too narrow or too broad? Explain.

2. Does the researcher describe related theories?

3. Was the research setting artificial (e.g., a laboratory setting)? If yes, do you think that the gain in the control of extraneous variables offset the potential loss of information that would be obtained in a study in a more real-life setting? Explain.

4. Are there any obvious flaws or weaknesses in the researcher’s methods or measurement or observation? Explain.

5. Was the analysis statistical or non-statistical? Was the description of the results easy to understand? What type of study was can it be classified as?

6. Are definition of the key terms provided? Was the description of the results easy to understand? Explain.

7. Were the descriptions of procedures and methods sufficiently detailed? Were any important details missing? Explain.

8. Does the report lack information on matters that are potentially important for evaluating it?

9. Do the researchers include a discussion of the limitations of their study?

10. Does the researcher imply that his or her research proves something? Do you believe that it proves something? Explain.

Article Q

uestions

1.

How narrowly is the

research

problem defined?

I

n

your opinion, is it too narrow or too

broad? Explain.

2.

Does the

researcher

describe related theories?

3.

W

as the

research

setting artificial (

e.g., a l

aboratory

setting)?

If yes, do you think that the

gain in the

control

of extraneous variables

offset

the potential loss of information that

would be obtained in a study in a more real

life setting? Explain.

4.

Are there any

o

bvious

flaws or

weaknesses

in the

researcher’s

methods or measurement

or observation? Explain.

5.

W

as

the analysis statistical or non

statistical

? Was the description of the results easy to

understand?

What type of study was can it be classified as?

6.

Are definition of the key terms provided?

W

as

the description

of the results easy to

understand?

Explain

.

7.

W

ere

the descriptions of procedures and

methods

sufficiently

detailed?

W

ere

any

important

details missing?

Explain

.

8.

Does the report lack information on matters that

are potentially

important

for

evaluating

it?

9.

Do the

researchers

include a discussion of the limitations of

their

study?

10.

Does the

researcher

imply that his or her

research

proves something? Do you believ

e that

it proves something? Explain.

Article Questions

1. How narrowly is the research problem defined? In your opinion, is it too narrow or too

broad? Explain.

2. Does the researcher describe related theories?

3. Was the research setting artificial (e.g., a laboratory setting)? If yes, do you think that the

gain in the control of extraneous variables offset the potential loss of information that

would be obtained in a study in a more real-life setting? Explain.

4. Are there any obvious flaws or weaknesses in the researcher’s methods or measurement

or observation? Explain.

5. Was the analysis statistical or non-statistical? Was the description of the results easy to

understand? What type of study was can it be classified as?

6. Are definition of the key terms provided? Was the description of the results easy to

understand? Explain.

7. Were the descriptions of procedures and methods sufficiently detailed? Were any

important details missing? Explain.

8. Does the report lack information on matters that are potentially important for evaluating

it?

9. Do the researchers include a discussion of the limitations of their study?

10. Does the researcher imply that his or her research proves something? Do you believe that

it proves something? Explain.

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