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  1. Review the rubric to make sure you understand the criteria for earning your grade.
  2. Read Chapter 3, “Skills for Developing Yourself as a Leader,” and also review Chapters 1 and 2 in our textbook. Considering the information in Chapters 1 through 3, think of the elements of developing a personal leadership plan. 
  3. Review Figures 3.2 and 3.3 in our textbook. 
    1. Develop your own GAPS analysis:  
      1. Follow the format of the GAPS analysis when you create your own personal development plan for this assignment. 
      2. Provide a detailed explanation that demonstrates clear, insightful critical thinking. Please note that the GAPS analysis is not submitted for a grade. Only the development plan is to be submitted. 
  4. In the Goals section, clearly discuss what your career goals are and what steps (strategies) you feel you need to take in order to achieve those goals. 
  5. In the Abilities section, give an honest assessment of your current strengths that will assist you in reaching your career goals as well as an assessment of what developmental needs (weaknesses) you have. 
  6. In the Perceptions section, consider how others perceive you. Get feedback from peers, subordinates, and supervisors to critically assess how others see you. 
  7. In the Standards section, list expectations that must be met in order for you to achieve your career goals. 
  8. Up to this point, you have only done the preliminary work for developing a development plan. Nothing that you have done thus far will be turned in. 
  9. You are now ready to write your development plan, which will be submitted for a grade. 
  10. Clearly address Steps 1–7 toward the end of the section “Development Planning” in Chapter 3.  
  11. A paragraph or two is required for each of Steps 1–6. If you can reflect with a partner (Step 7), that would make your plan more likely to succeed, but it is not a requirement for this assignment. If you would like to use a partner, you may reach out to classmates via email or through the Course Cafe Forum.
  12. Your writing for each of Steps 1–7 should provide a detailed explanation that demonstrates clear, insightful critical thinking. Be sure to use correct spelling, grammar, and APA format. The overall plan should be at least 1,000 words in length. 
    1. For questions on APA style, go to the APA Style Guide.
  13. When you have completed your assignment, save a copy for yourself and submit a copy to your instructor by the end of the workshop. 
  14. You may want to review your progress every six months toward completing your goals or revise your plan as your situation changes.

Step 1: Career and development objectives. Your career objective comes directly from the goals quadrant of the GAPS analysis; it is where you want to be or what you want to be doing in your career a year or so in the future. The development objective comes from your gaps-of-the-GAPS analysis; it should be a high-priority development need pertaining to your career objective. People should be working on no more than two or three development needs at any one time.

· Step 2: Criteria for success. What would it look like if you developed a particular skill, acquired technical expertise, or changed the behavior outlined in your development objective? This can be a difficult step in development planning, particularly with “softer” skills such as listening, managing conflict, or building relationships with others.

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· Step 3: Action steps. The focus in the development plan should be on the specific, on-the-job action steps leadership practitioners will take to meet their development needs. However, sometimes it is difficult for leaders to think of appropriate on-the-job action steps. Three excellent resources that provide on-the-job action steps for a variety of development needs are two books, The Successful Manager’s Handbook 47 and For Your Improvement, 48 and the development planning and coaching software DevelopMentor.49 These three resources can be likened to restaurant menus in that they provide leadership practitioners with a wide variety of action steps to work on just about any development need.

· Step 4: Whom to involve and when to reassess dates. This step in a development plan involves feedback—whom do you need to get it from, and how often do you need to get it? This step in the development plan is important because it helps keep you on track. Are your efforts being noticed? Do people see any improvement? Are there things you need to do differently? Do you need to refocus your efforts?

· Step 5: Stretch assignments. When people reflect on when they have learned the most, they often talk about situations where they felt they were in over their heads. These situations stretched their knowledge and skills and often are seen as extremely beneficial to learning. If you know of a potential assignment, such as a task force, a project management team, or a rotational assignment, that would emphasize the knowledge and skills you need to develop and accelerate your learning, you should include it in your development plan.

· Step 6: Resources. Often people find it useful to read a book, attend a course, or watch a recorded program to gain foundational knowledge about a particular development need. These methods generally describe the how-to steps for a particular skill or behavior.

· Step 7: Reflect with a partner. In accordance with the AOR model described in Chapter 2, you should periodically review your learning and progress with a partner. The identity of the partner is not particularly important as long as you trust his or her opinion and the partner is familiar with your work situation and development plan.

·

Step 1: Career and development o

bjectives.

Your career objective comes directly

from the goals quadrant of the GAPS analysis; it is where you want to be or what

you want to be doing in your career a year or so in the future. The development

objective comes from your gaps

of

the

GAPS anal

ysis; it should be a high

priority

development need pertaining to your career objective. People should be working

on no more than two or three development needs at any one time.

·

Step 2: Criteria for success.

What would it look like if you developed a particular

skill, acquired technical expertise, or changed the behavior outlined in your

development objective? This can be a difficult step in development planning,

particularly with “softer” skills such as liste

ning, managing conflict, or building

relationships with others.

·

Step 3: Action steps.

The focus in the development plan should be on the specific,

on

the

job action steps leadership practitioners will take to meet their development

needs. However, sometime

s it is difficult for leaders to think of appropriate on

the

job action steps. Three excellent resources that provide on

the

job action steps for

a variety of development needs are two books,

The Successful Manager’s

Handbook

47

and

For Your Improvement,

48

and the development planning and

coaching software

DevelopMentor

.

49

These three resources can be likened to

restaurant menus in that they provide leadership practitioners with a wide variety

of action steps to wor

k on just about any development need.

·

Step 4: Whom to involve and when to reassess dates.

This step in a development

plan involves feedback

whom do you need to get it from, and how often do you

need to get it? This step in the development plan is important

because it helps keep

you on track. Are your efforts being noticed? Do people see any improvement? Are

there things you need to do differently? Do you need to refocus your efforts?

·

Step 5: Stretch assignments.

When people reflect on when they have learned

the

most, they often talk about situations where they felt they were in over their heads.

These situations stretched their knowledge and skills and often are seen as

extremely beneficial to learning. If you know of a potential assignment, such as a

task f

orce, a project management team, or a rotational assignment, that would

emphasize the knowledge and skills you need to develop and accelerate your

learning, you should include it in your development plan.

·

Step 6: Resources.

Often people find it useful to r

ead a book, attend a course, or

watch a recorded program to gain foundational knowledge about a particular

development need. These methods generally describe the how

to steps for a

particular skill or behavior.

·

Step 7: Reflect with a partner.

In accordance

with the AOR model described

in

Chapter 2

, you should periodically review your learning and progress with a

partner. The identity of the partner is not particular

ly important as long as you trust

 Step 1: Career and development objectives. Your career objective comes directly

from the goals quadrant of the GAPS analysis; it is where you want to be or what

you want to be doing in your career a year or so in the future. The development

objective comes from your gaps-of-the-GAPS analysis; it should be a high-priority

development need pertaining to your career objective. People should be working

on no more than two or three development needs at any one time.

 Step 2: Criteria for success. What would it look like if you developed a particular

skill, acquired technical expertise, or changed the behavior outlined in your

development objective? This can be a difficult step in development planning,

particularly with “softer” skills such as listening, managing conflict, or building

relationships with others.

 Step 3: Action steps. The focus in the development plan should be on the specific,

on-the-job action steps leadership practitioners will take to meet their development

needs. However, sometimes it is difficult for leaders to think of appropriate on-the-

job action steps. Three excellent resources that provide on-the-job action steps for

a variety of development needs are two books, The Successful Manager’s

Handbook

47

and For Your Improvement,

48

and the development planning and

coaching software DevelopMentor.

49

These three resources can be likened to

restaurant menus in that they provide leadership practitioners with a wide variety

of action steps to work on just about any development need.

 Step 4: Whom to involve and when to reassess dates. This step in a development

plan involves feedback—whom do you need to get it from, and how often do you

need to get it? This step in the development plan is important because it helps keep

you on track. Are your efforts being noticed? Do people see any improvement? Are

there things you need to do differently? Do you need to refocus your efforts?

 Step 5: Stretch assignments. When people reflect on when they have learned the

most, they often talk about situations where they felt they were in over their heads.

These situations stretched their knowledge and skills and often are seen as

extremely beneficial to learning. If you know of a potential assignment, such as a

task force, a project management team, or a rotational assignment, that would

emphasize the knowledge and skills you need to develop and accelerate your

learning, you should include it in your development plan.

 Step 6: Resources. Often people find it useful to read a book, attend a course, or

watch a recorded program to gain foundational knowledge about a particular

development need. These methods generally describe the how-to steps for a

particular skill or behavior.

 Step 7: Reflect with a partner. In accordance with the AOR model described

in Chapter 2, you should periodically review your learning and progress with a

partner. The identity of the partner is not particularly important as long as you trust

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