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Write a TOPIC PROPOSAL memo that details what you plan to do for the final Core Assessment Essay. You must address all the following details in order to receive full credit (30 points). Please follow the traditional format of a business memo – Microsoft Word has templates for these.

The primary text(s) you will be analyzing and whether you will be using any of your previous work as a starting point

Tentative thesis statement / focus

Outline of major points/ideas

Any sources you plan to use and where you found them

Any questions you have or problems you anticipate

Rubric

Topic Proposal Rubric (Core Assessment)

Topic Proposal Rubric (Core Assessment)

Criteria Ratings Pts

This criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeYou state the titles of the primary texts you will analyzing

5 to >3.0 pts

Acceptable

3 to >0 pts

Unacceptable

5 pts

This criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeYou explain whether you will be using any of your previous work as a starting point

5 to >3.0 pts

Acceptable

3 to >0 pts

Unacceptable

5 pts

This criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeYou include a tentative thesis statement or planned focus

5 to >3.0 pts

Acceptable

3 to >0 pts

Unacceptable

5 pts

This criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeYou list an outline of major points/ideas

5 to >3.0 pts

Acceptable

3 to >0 pts

Unacceptable

5 pts

This criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeYou list any sources you plan to use and where you found them

5 to >3.0 pts

Acceptable

3 to >0 pts

Unacceptable

5 pts

This criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeYou include any questions you have or problems you anticipate

5 to >3.0 pts

Acceptable

3 to >0 pts

Unacceptable

5 pts

Total Points: 30

“Toni Morrison’s The Bluest Eye and F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby”

Introduction to Fiction

Toni Morrison’s The Bluest Eye and F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby

Name of student

FICTION 5

Institutional affiliation

Introduction to Fiction

Toni Morrison’s The Bluest Eye and F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby

Introduction

At the face of it, Toni Morrison’s The Bluest Eye and F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby are very distinct in plotting and messaging but scrutiny of the two novels gives the picture and sense of the struggle of cultures. Morrison looks at the effect of imposing the beauty standards of a middle-class white American girl on a young African-American girl, which turns out to be tragic. The Great Gatsby juxtaposes the search for the American dream of happiness and dream and the fading traditional values in the quest for cynicism and materialism. The two novels picture instances where one is at the crossroads and feels that the position that they are initially holding is not enough and there is an evitable need to look for a greener pasture. The moral of the stories, read together, for which I have chosen them is that not at all times that one is at the bridge, crossing is necessary. Sometimes it needs self-realization and acceptance to overcome the circumstance like in The Bluest Eyes and sometimes there is a need to make the step with due regard to self-awareness as in The Great Gatsby.

Essay Body

The Bluest Eye, a tale by Toni Morrison, examines the negative consequences of instilling white American girl values of magnificence in the developing female character of a young African American young lady in the mid-1940s (The Bluest Eye Toni Morrison – Essay – ENotes.Com, n.d.). The novel vividly depicts the emotional pulverization of a young person of color, Pecola Breedlove, who seeks adoration and acknowledgment in a society that ignores and degrades individuals of her race, and is enlivened by a conversation Morrison once had with a grade school colleague who wished for blue eyes. Pecola pitifully aches to have the ordinary American norms of female excellence, specifically, blue eyes white skin, and light hair, as presented to her by well-known icons and white culture as her psychological condition gradually unravels (The Bluest Eye Toni Morrison – Essay – ENotes.Com, n.d.).

Composed as a divided account from different points of view and with huge typographical deviations, The Bluest Eye compares sections from the Dick-and-Jane grammar school groundwork with recollections and accounts of Pecola’s life on the other hand told by and large by one of Pecola’s presently developed cherished companions and by an all-knowing storyteller (The Bluest Eye Toni Morrison – Essay – ENotes.Com, n.d.).

The Bluest Eye, published during the heyday of the Black Arts Movement in the late 1960s and early 1970s, has gotten a lot of attention from abstract critics. The Bluest Eye has been widely regarded as an abstract watershed, inspiring a slew of writing by African American women about their personalities and experiences as women of color. Its sensitive portrayal of African American female character and insightful analysis of the concealed bigotry replicated by American social definitions of magnificence has been widely regarded as an abstract watershed, rousing a slew of writing by African American women about their personalities and experiences as women of color.

The Great Gatsby, on the other hand, published in 1925, captures not just the jazz-age search for the American dream of riches and joy, but also the broader concerns of blurring traditional qualities in the face of growing realism and criticism (The Great Gatsby, F. Scott Fitzgerald – Essay – ENotes.Com, n.d.). The novel is pervaded with echoes of the American Dream, which contrasts the supposed authenticity and goodwill of the “Western” characters with the materialism and sophistication of the “Eastern” characters.

Fitzgerald outlines his plot as a story within a story where, as the storyteller, Nick Carraway, tells his account of Jay Gatsby’s life. Nick takes a job position in New York City and rents a home in West Egg, Long Island, near the luxurious house of the strange Jay Gatsby, seeking freedom from his confining Midwest surroundings. Daisy Buchanan, Nick’s wealthy cousin, and her better half Tom invite Nick to supper with Jordan Baker, the attractive yet whimsical Jordan Baker, at their opulent home on the adjacent island of East Egg (The Great Gatsby, F. Scott Fitzgerald – Essay – ENotes.Com, n.d.).

Nick returns home, disturbed by the Buchanans’ seemingly aimless lives, to find his neighbor Gatsby staring longingly at a green light across the sound coming from the Buchanans’ house. Later, Tom persuades Nick to accompany him to the Valley of Ashes, where he introduces him to his blowsy fancy woman, Myrtle Wilson. Tom, Myrtle, and Nick end up at a loft in New York, where a crazy party ensues, and Tom attacks Myrtle and breaks her nose amid the chaos. Later in the month, Gatsby invites Nick to attend a lavish party at his estate, where Nick has an amusing encounter with his neighbor. This is the first of many events Nick attends at the Gatsby manor, which is organized by a significant number of the wealthy and famous (The Great Gatsby, F. Scott Fitzgerald – Essay – ENotes.Com, n.d.).

Conclusion

A juxtaposed reading of the two novels with the knowledge of fiction is very useful. The knowledge of fiction provides the platform for appreciating the educative aspects of the pieces of literature. The two texts demonstrate the sense of struggling to fall in place a strange environment that others consider as the acceptable and ordinary way of life. A reading of the novels provides an insight into the life and the struggles people go through to adapt to what other people view as the normal course of life. These struggles result in self-realization and facilitate the beginning of new life.

References

The Bluest Eye Toni Morrison—Essay—ENotes.com. (n.d.). ENotes. Retrieved April 12, 2021, from /topics/bluest-eye/critical-essays/bluest-eye-toni-morrison

The Great Gatsby, F. Scott Fitzgerald—Essay—ENotes.com. (n.d.). ENotes. Retrieved April 12, 2021, from /topics/great-gatsby/critical-essays/great-gatsby-f-scott-fitzgerald

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