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1. The first step in writing a persuasive speech/research report is selecting the topic that lends itself to an issue. Choose a topic/problem about which you feel strongly. Then be sure to narrow the topic down to a specific problem, which you can reasonably discuss within the limits set by this essay’s length and the time limit of the speech that it will generate. Ask yourself what you, or your prospective audience, want to know about this problem as an illustration of the larger issue. Example: Issue: Technology’s negative influence on society. Problem: Technology in the classroom has not enhanced the quality of education of our young people. Solution: Use Technology judiciously, and focus on critical thinking skills rather than “edutainment.” 

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2. The next step in writing a speech is gathering information. You want people to believe that you know what you’re talking about! So, you’ll need to do some research. For instance, let’s say your big issue is the environment. You promise to pass a law that says all new cars must run on electricity, not gas. That will cut down on air pollution! But it would help if you had a few facts: How much bad air does one car create each year? How many new cars are sold in your country every year? So how much will pollution be cut every year? Use the library or the Internet to do research. Your new policy proposal will sound really strong if you have the facts to back it up. Speeches of this nature usually include a broad series of references possibly to current events, history and literature studied in class (as well as researched). Consider the key contextual elements that relate to your topic: e.g. Moral, Religious, Social, Political, Economic, Educational, Philosophical, Historical, Literary, Environmental, General Axioms and Medical. Then before you start the actual research, take a look at your resources. The Internet, newspapers, and reference books are common sources of information. Visit the library. Include at least three sources in your references at the end of the essay. 

3. Once you have located your sources of information, read the material carefully and take notes. Take the general nature of the topics above and narrow the focus of the issue to something tangible and concrete. For example, the technological example can be narrowed down to “problems with including technology in education without reducing student competency and academic standards. Once you identify your problem, then divide it into several sub-topics, which eventually will become the basis of your arguments. List the topic/issue, sub-topics/arguments, and the facts that relate to each sub-topic. Record direct quotations from your sources, electronic or otherwise. These include author, title, publisher, and page number. 

4. Your notes should demonstrate knowledge of the methods of organization and will help you arrange your speech. By arranging your arguments, you may discover not only an ideal organization for your speech, but also a need for further research. Once you have arranged material, complete an essay outline with the traditional structure of “Problem-Solution.” In the first part of your speech you say, “Here’s a problem, here’s why things are so terrible.” (see chart for aid in structure):

5. In the second part of your speech you say, “Here’s what we can do to make things better.” Sometimes it helps to persuade people if you have statistics or other facts in your speech. And sometimes you can persuade people by quoting someone else that the audience likes and respects. 

6. Consider the writing variables so that you can fulfil your audience’s needs. In this case, two audiences: your teacher and your peers. Remember that your purpose is to present an issue and to inform your audience(s) convincingly and to entertain. The issue should demonstrate a clear division between the statement of a problem and possible solutions. Express yourself simply yet emphatically. Aristotle, and later Cicero, also identified the rhetorical approaches we use most to persuade as “ethos” or ethical stature, credibility or authority of the speaker, “logos” or knowledge and “pathos” or emotion. Will you use one rhetorical appeal over the others or a combination of all three? 

7. Keep in mind that every topic sentence (the first sentence of each paragraph) should demonstrate a clear formulation of your argument regarding the issue as you have presented it in the thesis Usually, this entails restating part of your thesis followed by the word “because” and then the argument or claim you wish to make. 

8. With your audience in mind, clearly identify the problem with a clear transition as in “This identifies a very serious problem…” and the important shift to the solution as in “How can we solve this situation?” 

9. Before you write the first draft, determine whether your treatment of the subject will be serious or light-hearted. Does the topic require that you use personal pronouns like I, me, mine? Do such pronouns create anunnecessary, subjective tone? Once you have decided on a definite style, follow it consistently.

 10. Finally, write like you talk. Remember that you’re writing a speech, not an academic essay. People will hear the speech. The more conversational you can make it sound, the better. 

Therefore: a) Use short sentences. It’s better to write two simple sentences than one long, complicated sentence. b) Use contractions. Say “I’m” instead of “I am” “we’re” instead of “we are.” c) Don’t use big words that you wouldn’t use when talking to someone. d) You don’t have to follow all the rules of written English grammar. “Like this. See? Got it? Hope so.” Generally, people don’t always talk in complete sentences with verbs and nouns. So try to write like people talk. e) Use concrete words and examples. Concrete details keep people involved and interested. For instance, which is more effective? A vague sentence like: “Open play spaces for children’s sports are in short supply.” Or the more concrete “We need more baseball and soccer fields for our kids.” Always read your speech aloud while you’re writing it. You’ll hear right away if you sound like a book or a real person talking!

The Persuasive Speech Project Learning Goals:

O2. use speaking skills and strategies appropriately to communicate with different audiences for a variety of purposes;

W1. generate, gather, and organize ideas and information to write for an intended purpose and audience;

W2. draft and revise their writing, using a variety of literary, informational, and graphic forms and stylistic elements appropriate for

the purpose and audience;

W3. use editing, proofreading, and publishing skills and strategies, and knowledge of language conventions, to correct errors, refine

expression, and present their work effectively;

Success Criteria: Successfully preparing and delivering a persuasive speech

Read all pages in this document before beginning your task!

PERSUADE: [verb]

➢ to cause a person to do/believe in something they did not/would not do/ believe before ➢ to embrace a point of view by means of argument, reasoning or entreaty.

THE TASK:

➢ The Persuasive Speech is designed to persuade the audience that your perspective is viable, and is usually on a serious topic although wit and humour can be useful at points

➢ A problem/solution approach must be taken, i.e. the speaker must identify a problem in society, and propose or examine one or more solutions

➢ No props or costumes are permitted ➢ A single index card of notes is allowed ➢ Salutations are option ➢ Speeches should be 3-5 minutes in length (30 seconds above or below are not afforded a time penalty) ➢ Research a topic of YOUR choice—choose something about which you feel passionate & find

interesting….something a little bit controversial is good (but, remember the circumstance you are in…a

Catholic school, please), and present a Persuasive Speech.

➢ The actual delivery of your speech will be evaluated along with the content of your argument

Narrow Down Three Persuasive Speech Ideas, and then choose one

Review your short list with persuasive speech ideas and narrow your choices:

• Do you know global, national, state, community, job or school related problems and solutions, issues or

controversies, related to the persuasive speech ideas?

• Historical or current events, places, processes, organizations or interesting people?

• Concerns, opinions, beliefs, attitudes or values?

• What did you see about the persuasive speech ideas in the news or read in books?

• Is there a link with personal experiences, professional or personal goals?

The answers help you to find your angle of approach/point of view for a persuasive speech. So, select a few

specific angles. Those can serve as main points of the persuasive speech ideas. Here are some topics :

Academic Dishonesty

Addiction

Aging Population

Agricultural Policy

Air Pollution

Airline Safety

Family Violence

Fat Tax On Food

Gangs

Genetic Engineering

Genetically Engineered Foods

Global Warming

Government Fraud & Waste

Hate Crime

Home Schooling

Homeless

Human Cloning

Immigration

Infectious Diseases

Juvenile Crime

Media Violence

Minimum Wage

Nuclear Technology

Organ Donation

Prison regime

Recycling

School Uniforms

School Violence

Smoking

Space Exploration

Stem Cell Research

Terrorism

Tobacco Industry

Transportation

Urban Terrorism

Vaccinations

Violent Video Games

RUBRIC & EVALUATION REQUIREMENTS

Criteria Level 1: Level 2: *Level 3: Level 4:

MATERIAL

ORGANIZATION

No clear attempt at

structure is presented; clear

logical fallacies exist

An attempt at structure is

present; but is

confusing/illogical at times;

arguments may be flawed at

times

A clear structure is

discernible; the speech has

a definite plan/ order that

leads from point to point;

ideas are logical and

presentation of arguments

clear & effective

The structure is clear &

organizational

presentation is unique;

presentation of

arguments are

compelling and complex

in thought

SUBJECT

SELECTION

The speaker has used poor

judgment in choosing a

topic; no personalization

exists; the material is not

appropriate for the

audience; audience

unknown (could be

speaking to any group)

An assigned topic has been

chosen, but the address is either

off topic or the main point is

not clearly defined; infrequent

personalization exists; the

material somewhat matches the

audience; audience may be

unclear

A clear assigned topic is

chosen; the speech has

personalized the material;

the material is appropriate

for audience; audience

clear

The speaker has clearly

evaluated an assigned

topic choice &

personalized the material

to an excellent & artistic

level; the material choice

is perfect for the

audience created

APPLICATION: __________

DELIVERY

The speaker is not

effective in securing &

holding the audience’s

attention; speaker has

no clear tone noted

toward subject; the

speech is monotone;

no attempt is made at

direct eye contact; the

speaker is not clearly

in control of their

content; speaker re-

starts speech from

beginning at any point

during address; the

speech is mechanical;

hesitation abounds;

notes are consistently

relied upon and/or

read from

The speaker is somewhat

effective in securing &

holding the audience’s

attention; speaker’s tone

is not clear or

detached/aloof; the

speaker does not clearly

attempt to change rate of

speech for effect; the

speaker rarely sees

audience & has a frequent

‘faraway look’; speaker

frequently sways about &

causes visual distractions;

speaker is frequently lost

in address or ‘blanks’ in

moments; speech is

inconsistent in informing

or/& entertaining; the

address seems mechanical;

frequent hesitation exists

in the speech; speaker

clearly relies on notes

The speaker is effective in

securing & holding the

audience’s attention; the

speaker’s tone/attitude

towards subject is clear &

supports meaning; the

speaker attempts to change

rate of speech, pitch &

volume for effect; the

speaker occasionally makes

direct contact with sections

of audience; the speaker

usually stands naturally,

but may sway &/or move

around causing occasional

distractions; mostly gives

impression of “being on

one’s toes”–speaker makes

a clear effort in informing

& entertaining; the address

is not mechanical; the

speaker has an ease &

naturalness; little hesitation

exists in the speech;

speaker may subtly rely on

notes at times

The speaker is extremely effective in

securing & maintaining the audience’s

attention; speaker’s tone/attitude toward

subject enhances meaning; variations in

rate of speech, pitch & volume give “life”

to the speech; the speaker clearly makes

eye contact with audience; speaker stands

naturally without swaying & is

‘grounded’; speaker is clearly on his/her

‘toes’ & makes excellent effort in

informing & entertaining; the address is

very natural & pleasant without any sense

of ‘memorization’; speaker is in complete

ease; no hesitation exists in the speech;

little to no reference to notes are used,

overall

STYLE

Command of the

language is poor; most

words are

indecipherable; diction

choices not

considered; figurative

language not used

Command of the language

is mediocre; some words

are enunciation in a

careless manner; diction

choices do not clearly add

to purpose; figurative

language, if used, are

pedestrian & trite

Command of the language

is good; most words are

enunciation in a clear &

distinct manner; diction

choices confirm meaning &

purpose; use of figurative

language effective

Command of the language is excellent; all

words are clear & distinct; diction choices

superb & clearly add implications &

subtly to meaning & purpose; use of

figurative language exceptional

COMMUNICATION: _______________

Topics and Pre-writing Suggestions for Speech Writing:

1. The first step in writing a persuasive speech/research report is selecting the topic that lends itself to an issue. Choose a

topic/problem about which you feel strongly. Then be sure to narrow the topic down to a specific problem, which you can

reasonably discuss within the limits set by this essay’s length and the time limit of the speech that it will generate. Ask

yourself what you, or your perspective audience, want to know about this problem as an illustration of the larger issue.

Example:

Issue: Technology’s negative influence on society.

Problem: Technology in the classroom has not enhanced the quality of education of our young people.

Solution: Use Technology judiciously, and focus on critical thinking skills rather than “edutainment.”

2. The next step in writing a speech is gathering information. You want people to believe that you know what you’re

talking about! So, you’ll need to do some research. For instance, let’s say your big issue is the environment. You promise

to pass a law that says all new cars must run on electricity, not gas. That will cut down on air pollution! But it would help

if you had a few facts: How much bad air does one car create each year? How many new cars are sold in your country

every year? So how much will pollution be cut every year? Use the library or the Internet to do research. Your new policy

proposal will sound really strong if you have the facts to back it up. Speeches of this nature usually include a broad series

of references possibly to current events, history and literature studied in class (as well as researched).

Consider the key contextual elements that relate to your topic: e.g. Moral, Religious, Social, Political, Economic,

Educational, Philosophical, Historical, Literary, Environmental, General Axioms and Medical. Then before you start the

actual research, take a look at your resources. The Internet, newspapers, and reference books are common sources of

information. Visit the library. Include at least

three sources in your references at the end of the essay.

3. Once you have located your sources of information, read the material carefully and take notes. Take the general nature of the topics above and narrow the focus of the issue to something tangible and concrete. For example, the technological

example can be narrowed down to “problems with including technology in education without reducing student

competency and academic standards. Once you identify your problem, then divide it into several sub-topics, which

eventually will become the basis of your arguments. List the topic/issue, sub-topics/arguments, and the facts that relate to

each sub-topic. Record direct quotations from your sources, electronic or otherwise. These include author, title, publisher,

and page number.

4. Your notes should demonstrate knowledge of the methods of organization and will help you arrange your speech. By

arranging your arguments, you may discover not only an ideal organization for your speech, but also a need for further

research.

Once you have arranged material, complete an essay outline with the traditional structure of “Problem-Solution.”

In the first part of your speech you say, “Here’s a problem, here’s why things are so terrible.” (see chart for aid in

structure):

ORGANIZING IDEAS INTO ARGUMENTS

Point that will serve as the basis of an argument. State the argument clearly in one

sentence. (Thesis + “because”…)

Name or title of the argument:

Proof: Use at least 2 or 3 supporting examples or other types of evidence to support

and develop the argument.

Each point should be supported by facts or examples

Supporting point #1:

Supporting point #2:

Supporting point #3:

Comment on it: Discuss the argument in 3 or 4 sentences with some detail. Why does

it matter? Why is it correct? How does it support your thesis or case-line?

Concluding sentence.

Summarize the argument and explain how it relates to the theme, thesis, case-line of

your speech.

5. In the second part of your speech you say, “Here’s what we can do to make things better.” Sometimes it helps to

persuade people if you have statistics or other facts in your speech. And sometimes you can persuade people by

quoting someone else that the audience likes and respects.

6. Consider the writing variables so that you can fulfil your audience’s needs. In this case, two audiences: your

teacher and your peers. Remember that your purpose is to present an issue and to inform your audience(s)

convincingly and to entertain. The issue should demonstrate a clear division between the statement of a problem and

possible solutions. Express yourself simply yet emphatically. Aristotle, and later Cicero, also identified the rhetorical

approaches we use most to persuade as “ethos” or ethical stature, credibility or authority of the speaker, “logos” or

knowledge and “pathos” or emotion. Will you use one rhetorical appeal over the others or a combination of all three?

7. Keep in mind that every topic sentence (the first sentence of each paragraph) should demonstrate a clear

formulation of your argument regarding the issue as you have presented it in the thesis Usually, this entails restating

part of your thesis followed by the word “because” and then the argument or claim you wish to make.

8. With your audience in mind, clearly identify the problem with a clear transition as in “This identifies a very

serious problem…” and the important shift to the solution as in “How can we solve this situation?”

9. Before you write the first draft, determine whether your treatment of the subject will be serious or light -hearted.

Does the topic require that you use personal pronouns like I, me, mine? Do such pronouns create anunnecessary,

subjective tone? Once you have decided on a definite style, follow it consistently.

10. Finally, write like you talk. Remember that you’re writing a speech, not an academic essay. People will hear the speech. The more conversational you can make it sound, the better.

Therefore:

a) Use short sentences. It’s better to write two simple sentences than one long, complicated sentence.

b) Use contractions. Say “I’m” instead of “I am” “we’re” instead of “we are.”

c) Don’t use big words that you wouldn’t use when talking to someone.

d) You don’t have to follow all the rules of written English grammar. “Like this. See? Got it? Hope so.”

Generally, people don’t always talk in complete sentences with verbs and nouns. So try to write like people talk.

e) Use concrete words and examples. Concrete details keep people involved and interested. For instance,

which is more effective? A vague sentence like: “Open play spaces for children’s sports are in short supply.” Or the more concrete “We need more baseball and soccer fields for our kids.” Always read your speech aloud while you’re

writing it. You’ll hear right away if you sound like a book or a real person talking!

REVISION QUESTIONS ABOUT YOUR ARGUMENTATIVE SPEECH

Below are ten vital concerns any speaker would have when preparing an argumentative speech.

Certainly, the audience is an important concern. It is important to know who will be there. Are the

audience members your age, older, or younger? Because of this, you might decide to word your

speech differently. Will your examples be different because of who is sitting in front of you? Why?

In the spaces below each item, write two or more important considerations for each aspect of an

effective speech.

1. What is the speech’s purpose/objective?

2. What is the organizational pattern of your speech? Will you employ cause and effect, chronology,

problem and solution, or another format? Why?

3. What kind of support will you use to make the speech convincing? Do you plan to use comparison

and contrast, examples, facts, illustrations? Why?

4. What are some things about the audience you should know in preparing the speech?

5. How will you start the speech to attract the attention of your listeners?

6. What closing thoughts or strategies will you use?

7. Why will you choose (or not choose) specific strategies that will make your speech an effective set

of arguments?

8. From what materials have you gathered your information for the speech? How credible are these

sources? Have you considered a broad range of evidence: Moral, Religious, Social, Political,

Economic, Educational, Philosophical, Historical, Literary, Environmental and Medical

9. What strategies in your speech’s construction have you included to make it is easier to

memorize?

10. What have you learned in practicing your speech that will eventually make it better?

Examine a few exemplars of successful persuasive essays by students from previous years: (annotations are for

structural clarity, and not needed for your presentation)

The Clone Wars : Why Cloning Should Be Forbidden by The Government

“It has become appallingly obvious that our technology has exceeded our humanity.” Says the great Albert

Einstein. It becomes a quandary when technology has reached such an advanced level, that human kind is trying

to use it, to generate human life. It becomes frightening, when they can. When the technology does not let them

try, but lets them succeed. When humans have made technology so advanced, that they are manufacturing

humans, instead of reproducing them using the miracle of conception. Human cloning should be strictly

forbidden by the law. Firstly because it could cause great diseases, secondly because it is

playing God, and thirdly because it would cause an unbalanced society. The chaotic side effects would be far greater than the futile benefits.

First of all, human cloning would bring numerous diseases and illnesses. This happens because of lack of gene

diversity. “Gene diversity is what keeps a species from being wiped out by one singular virus,” states

professional writer Margo Upson. (Upson, 2008) Diversity of genes happens because parents have different sets

of genes, and they fuse together. Hence clones do not have mutated genes, because they were not born

naturally. A virus adapts to every human it inhabits before it dies, but if a virus was to spread with its

adaptation to specific genes onto another human who had identical genes, the virus would be serious if not

lethal. This small pattern of transferring sickness can ultimately lead to our extinction. Clone inbreeding could

speed up the process, because people with the same genotype would be reproducing among themselves. For that

reason, the more clones there are, the higher chance human kind has of extinction. Consequently human

cloning should be forbidden by the law.

Secondly human cloning should be prohibited because it is against religious beliefs. The mere humans would be

taking the position of God in creating life. The Catholic Church is against human cloning because it is

obviously out of God’s permission. In the Bible when God made everything “good”, humans reproduced

naturally, therefore cloning humans is clearly a serious sin. God made the natural order that humans give birth

to other humans, not that technology creates a human life form. Human cloning would be austerely against

God’s will and transgressing nature. Consequently human cloning should be prohibited by the government.

Thirdly human cloning would cause an unbalanced society. It would turn the world into social turmoil. In 1955

Rosa Parks fought for the equal rights of black Americans, it was not until 1964 that the Civil Rights Act was

passed. (Roberts, 2009) If humans are so abysmal that they would try to seize the civil rights of other fellow

humans, just because of their race, what makes you believe that human kind will not discriminate if not

persecute clones. There would be countless riots, because of the amount of people against human cloning.

Governments would use cloning not to benefit the public, but to benefit themselves. They would be use cloning

to create children that are more intelligent, special in size, and extraordinary. These supernatural clones could

now be used as destructive weapons! This would result in more terrorism, large armies of clones, and World

War 3! Not to mention parenting and family life would slowly lose its value, making people more selfish and

evil. Ultimately cloning will cause world destruction! Consequently, human cloning should be restricted by the

law.

To conclude, Richard Nicholson of the British Bulletin of Medical Ethics says that cloning research may

well be “sowing the seeds of our own destruction.” (Cheng, N/A) Human cloning would cause wide spread illnesses, it would be playing God, and would cause an unbalanced and even a

destructive society. For these three reasons, human cloning should obviously be strictly

forbidden by the law. Because if it won’t be, human kind may as well be sowing the seeds of their own destruction.

Legend:

1. Thesis Statement – declares what you believe and what you intend to prove. 2. Directional Sentence- declares your three arguments 3. Topic Sentences- describes the content and direction of the paragraph

4. Analytical Sentences- declares the thoughts and comments about the subject stated beforehand

The Unnecessary Plight of the Scapegoat

Referees, teachers, government, and others have all unfairly been blamed for numerous social ills. This is

reflective of the human nature to absolve oneself of responsibility and hold scapegoats accountable. Albert Schweitzer, a

world renowned philosopher, musician, theologian, and doctor once said, “Man must cease attributing his problems to his

environment and learn again to exercise his will – his personal responsibility.” This concept is simple, yet the message is

profound, and raises a compelling question, “Do scapegoats perform a necessary social task?” Truthfully, and contrary to

popular opinion, the tendency to blame scapegoats is futile. It merely excuses an action or complacency, as seen in Nazi

Germany, or more recently with fast food chains or the government. It is evident that people are not willing to accept

responsibility for their own actions and seek others to bear their burdens. When society creates scapegoats, a worldwide

crisis can unfold, as it did about seventy years ago.

For the past two thousand years, Anti-Semitics have blamed the Jews for the death of Jesus Christ. This notion

was further embellished in Germany, when in 1933, Adolph Hitler came into power, in the midst of a depression. Hitler

blamed this economic catastrophe on the Jewish people, and segregated them, casting them as a different race. Along

with his followers, he exterminated many Jews, promising that prosperity would come to Germany if it became a pure

Aryan nation. (Cruxton and Wilson, p. 121 – 219) However, as revealed by history, the Nazis’ actions were futile.

Hitler’s horrific attempts to “purify” Germany rapidly gained publicity. However, other countries did not admire such

abuse of scapegoats, but, rightly, found it deplorable. World War II was initiated to liberate the Jewish people and conquer the Nazis. Eventually, the Germans lost the war, many Nazis were killed, and survivi ng Jews were emancipated,

thus proving Hitler’s mission unsuccessful. By targeting scapegoats, Germany’s problems were not solved, but

exacerbated with ensuing global disaster. This demonstrates that society’s use of scapegoats is futile. However, not all

examples of scapegoats are this severe, and many are present in daily life.

It appears that people are not even willing to take responsibility for their own bodies, and fast food establishments

are commonly blamed for the severe problem of obesity. According to Statistics Canada, by 2003, the adult obesity rate in

Canada had accelerated to twenty-three percent of the population. Some might argue that people lead hectic lives in this

era, and simply do not have time to prepare healthful meals. They insist that the only option available is fast food, and

ignore all others, thus casting fast-food empires as the problem. They therefore, continue to satisfy their appetites with

“Big Macs” and “super-sized combos”. By blaming fast-food restaurants, the obesity issue is not addressed, but is

actually intensified, for people do not accept responsibility for their weight. They fail to make the necessary lifestyle

changes, insisting that they have no other choice and thus, the problem expands. For some, neither of the aforementioned

situations may be pertinent, but this year in Toronto, a new and lethal situation has arisen, alarming to all citizens.

2005 has been described by many as the deadliest year in this city, for, to date, there have been forty-nine homicides

due to gun violence. There have been numerous accounts for this violent outbreak. Insufficient government funding for

youth programs in impoverished areas is commonly identified as the problem. According to Maryham Behmard of the

Toronto Star, “the task [of keeping children in under-privileged neighbourhood away from gun violence] has been made

more difficult by government cut backs and lack of after-school programs.” (Behmard, Toronto Star, October 25th 2005)

However, surely non-existent clubs cannot wield weapons. Once again, people search for scapegoats, to absolve

themselves of blame, and thus excuse the acts. The government did not put weapons into the hands of children and teach

them to shoot. To illustrate this point, although functions such as the “Jobs for Youth” program have been initiated, the

gun homicide rate has not decreased. (Maryham Behmard Toronto Star, October 25th). By blaming the government, the

failure to instil proper morals in young people is being avoided. This proves, again, that scapegoats are futile. Blaming

the government, or any other person or organization is simply an indication of cowardice and does not resolve problems.

Society has targeted scapegoats in the past and present in both trivial and significant ways. However, these

scapegoats must be diminished from society. Such tendency must be addressed. People must take responsibility for their

own actions, and accept blame. It is evident that blaming scapegoats for social ills solves nothing; whether it was

targeting Jews, fast-food chains, or the government. Rather, such trend merely distracts society from the possible

resolution of a problem. If everyone would learn from history and work to truly address issues of concern, some mistakes

of the past could be avoided.

Introduction:

Opening Statement / Hook – Red

Thesis – Blue

Directional Statement – Green

Directional Statement – Purple

Body Paragraphs:

Point / Topic Sentence – Black

Proof – Red

Comment – Blue

Concluding Statement – Green

Directional Statement – Purple

Conclusion:

Restate Thesis – Red

Restate Directional Statement – Blue

Concluding Statement – Green

References

Cheng, Kevin. N/A. Cloning the Future. Retrieved on December 3 from:

http://library.thinkquest.org/C0122429/ethics/disadvantages.htm

Cohen, Daniel. (1998). Cloning. The Millerbook Press.

Roberts, Sam. (2009). 1955: Moving to the Front of the bus: During the Montgomery Bus Boycott, Blacks

Used their Wallets as Weapons in the Struggle for Civil Rights. Retrieved on December 3 from:

http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0BUE/is_5_138/ai_n17211142/pg_3/?tag=content;col1

Upson, Margo. (2008) What are Some Disadvantages of Cloning? Retrieved on December 3 from:

http://www.wisegeek.com/what-are-some-disadvantages-of-cloning.htmhttp://library.thinkquest.org/C0122429/ethics/disadvantages.htmhttp://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0BUE/is_5_138/ai_n17211142/pg_3/?tag=content;col1http://www.wisegeek.com/what-are-some-disadvantages-of-cloning.htm
  • Narrow Down Three Persuasive Speech Ideas, and then choose one

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