+1 (208) 254-6996 [email protected]
  

Step Three. Complete Service and Submit Paperwork by April 2.  

By November 20 you should have completed at least 12 hours of service or earned 60 points on the Civic Action Scorecard, and submitted the necessary paperwork either to Linda Levin in iCED or to me.  This deadline can be extended, but only if you contact me before April 2 to seek such an extension, and receive approval.

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Step Four. Submit Reflective Essay by April 16.

The second learning objective is to submit a reflective essay, on the same topic as the preliminary essay, but this time drawing from your experiences and from the normative ethical theories we have discussed in class to provide a more robust argument as to the moral/ethical importance of your service. This essay should address the same topic and answer the same questions as your preliminary essay, but this time, I expect you to 1) include information drawing specifically from the actual service/actions you performed, and 2) explicitly use at least one of the objectivist ethical theories or principles from your assigned readings in support of your chosen service. You will probably find that all or most of the ethical theories discussed could be used to support the service you chose to do, but this assignment only requires that you make use of one of them. This essay should be 500-1,500 words, and will be graded according to the usual 4.5 point scale, according to the clarity and concision of your arguments, and also how accurately you apply the ethical theory or theories you chose to the facts of the specific service or civic actions you provided. This essay should be submitted in PDF format to the “Reflective Essay” Drop Box below. This deadline cannot be extended beyond April 16 under any circumstances!

Running head: ETHICS IN CRITICAL THINKING 1

ETHICS IN CRITICAL THINKING 8

Ethics in Critical Thinking

Melvin Amaya

Institutional Affiliation

Ethics

Ethics in Critical Thinking

Ethical decision-making is important because it helps individuals make the right decisions when faced with different life situations. Individuals can easily analyze and evaluate different alternatives according to ethical principles and make the right decision. The application of ethics in critical thinking also allows people to eliminate unethical options and select the most appropriate course of action. Although critical ethical thinking appears to be straightforward, there are certain important things involved. Vinnari, Vinnari, and Kupsala (2017) state the process of making ethical decisions requires commitment, consciousness, and competence. Individuals should also ensure that they know and understand all the major ethical theories to develop moral choices whenever they are faced with ethical dilemmas. Several major benefits come with consistent ethical decision-making. For example, ethical decision improves relations between people as well as the quality of their interactions. People that make ethical decisions regularly are usually concerned about other people’s welfare and work towards ensuring that they do not harm them regardless of the situation. From the analysis of the case study provided, it is evident that the most ethical ad appropriate course of action is to save the drowning child. This paper analyzes several ethical theories that support the saving of the child as well as counterarguments.

Affirmation

The analysis of the scenario provided demonstrates why it would be unethical and immoral for one to ignore a drowning child regardless of whether it was their fault or not. Human beings should always do whatever is in their power to help other people in need or danger. From the case study, it is evident that the child will drown if no one acts. The most ethical thing to do would be to prevent the child from drowning. Several ethical theories support the argument that the child needs to be saved from drowning. Utilitarianism is one of the main ethical theories that would support the saving of the drowning child. According to the utilitarian ethical theory, it would be immoral for one to let the child drown while they are capable of saving their life (Payne, Corey & Fok, 2016). Utilitarianism is one of the major ethical theories, and it sets out to determine what an individual ought to do in certain situations. The theory recommends that individuals should always seek to act in a way that maximizes happiness or pleasure for the most number of people while at the same time minimizing pain or unhappiness (Paavilainen, J., & Koskinen, 2019). The act of saving the drowning child would automatically result in the maximization of happiness or pleasure to most people, including the child, family, and the person who would have saved them. However, ignoring to save the child would result in maximum unhappiness or pain for the highest number of people since the child would have lost their life. Therefore, saving the drowning child would count as the most ethical course of action.

Ethics of care is another ethical theory used to determine the best course of action in the case study. Ethics of care is a feminist approach to ethics, and it applies a context-bound approach towards decision making. Ethics of care implores people to always care for other people’s welfare and their own (Elley-Brown & Pringle, 2019). One of the original theories of care was provided by Nel Noddings, who was an American philosopher. Noddings argued that caring is the foundation of morality (Elley-Brown & Pringle, 2019). She further asserted that relationships are basic to human beings, and it is where the need to care arises. Human beings have a basic need to care for each other (Elley-Brown & Pringle, 2019). The application of ethics of care to the case study reveals that it would be immoral to ignore a drowning child. Every human being has a basic need to care for another person in danger. Therefore, the most ethical thing that one could do in such a situation is to save the drowning child. The need to care is further amplified because there is no danger involved in rescuing the child. The case study indicates that the pool or puddle of water in which the child is drowning is only four feet. It would therefore be immoral for one to save a child drowning in four feet of water.

Counter Argument

While utilitarianism and ethics of care indicate that it would be immoral to ignore the drowning child, other theories would support an individual’s actions that would have left the child to drown. Deontology could be used to ignore the child and let them drown. Deontology is one of the main ethical theories, and it depends on rules to differentiate between right and wrong (Dimitrios et al., 2018). Deontology is believed to have been developed by Emmanuel Kant, one of the most well-known figures in philosophy. Deontology asserts that ethical actions are made following universal moral codes. Existing laws usually guide every moral action. For example, laws such as do not steal and do not kill act as guides to individuals as they make decisions in their everyday life. Dimitrios et al. (2018) state that deontology is one of the simplest laws to apply because it only requires decision-makers to know all the rules and regulations. Deontology is different from consequentialism, where their results judge actions. Instead, deontology avoids the uncertainty of judging actions based on their outcomes by ensuring that decision-makers stick to a certain set of rules and regulations.

When applied to the case study, an individual is justified to ignore a drowning child because no law or regulation requires them to save the child. Although laws may require one to avoid harming children and other community members, it does not compel individuals to risk their lives and save others in need. After a quick review of existing laws and regulations, an individual that subscribes to deontology is more likely to continue with their business and ignore the drowning child. Although it may be hard to ignore a drowning child, strict adherence to deontology is expected to ensure that an individual only makes ethical decisions based on the existing set of rules and regulations.

Libertarianism is another approach to ethical decision-making that may be used to justify the action of ignoring a drowning child. Libertarianism asserts that individuals should be allowed to make independent decisions and do as they see fit as long as they respect other people’s freedom to do the same (Amadae, 2016). A person that ignores a drowning child could argue that they made a personal choice to walk away from the drowning child and that their decision should be respected. An individual could also argue that since they did not infringe on other people’s rights to make independent decisions, they are justified to make their own decision which may include walking away from the drowning child.

Resolution

From the analysis of the case study and the different ethical theories, it is evident that the most appropriate course of action would be to save the drowning child. People should not always stick to rigid ethical theories when making ethical choices. Instead, they need to carry out a thorough evaluation of the situation and develop the most appropriate course of action. It is against human nature to see another person in danger and ignore their calls for help. The problem is also worse when the person in need is a child. The most ethical and logical course of action would be to save the drowning child. The theories of utilitarianism and care ethics can be applied to justify the need to save the drowning child. Every individual should always seek to maximize happiness for the greatest number of people and minimize the greatest number of people’s unhappiness. Therefore, when applied to the scenario presented, an individual would analyze the situation and select the best way to increase happiness or pleasure while at the same time minimizing unhappiness. The only viable method that can be used to maximize happiness is the saving of the drowning child. Almost everyone will be pleased for the safety of the child as opposed to leaving them to drown. Ethics of care could also be critical in ensuring that the child is saved from drowning. Human beings have a moral responsibility of ensuring the safety of other people, especially when in nature. Therefore, it would be against human nature to see a drowning child and ignore it. The most humane course of action in such a situation would be to save the drowning child, even if it meant risking life.

Applying the major ethical theories to the scenario presented confirms that it would be unethical and unacceptable for an adult to ignore a drowning child when they are in a position to help. Any individual in such a situation should spring into action and ensure the safety of the child.

Conclusion

From the analysis of the arguments provided, it is evident that it would be immoral to ignore a drowning child. Ethics and morality help people differentiate between right and wrong, and in doing so, people should always consider their welfare and that of others. There are many ethical theories like utilitarianism and ethics of care that encourage people to take care of others and ensure that the least number of people are harmed or affected by one’s actions. Such theories focus on the outcome of people’s actions to determine right from wrong. For example, the outcome e of letting the child drown would result in more unhappiness and sadness. Therefore it would be immoral and unethical. Most societies around the world would expect an individual to save a drowning child from reducing suffering. Individuals need to understand all the major ethical theories and apply them whenever they are faced with ethical dilemmas.

References

Vinnari, M., Vinnari, E., & Kupsala, S. (2017). Sustainability matrix: Interest groups and ethical theories as to the basis of decision-making. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics, 30(3), 349-366. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10806-017-9670-y

Paavilainen, J., & Koskinen, E. (2019). Ayn Rand’s objectivist ethics applied to video game business: JBE. Journal of Business Ethics,  1-14. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10551-019-04159-y

Orsi, F. (2020). Meta-ethical disagreements. Trames: A Journal of the Humanities and Social Sciences, 24(3), 423-439. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.3176/tr.2020.3.09

Caldwell, C., Karri, R., & Vollmar, P. (2006). Principal theory and principle theory: Ethical governance from the follower’s perspective: JBE. Journal of Business Ethics, 66(2-3), 207-223. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10551-005-5586-y

Running head: SERVING ETHICALLY 1

SERVING ETHICALLY 2

Serving Ethically

Melvin Amaya

Civic Action

Institutional Affiliation

Serving Ethically

It is good to serve; however, it is best to serve ethically. Ethical services are not easy to execute; therefore, in most cases, people assume what good service is and what is an ethical service. Often, when we want to volunteer, we desire to serve and give back to the community because we believe that we will make a difference not in our lives but to the lives of those we serve. Voluntary work is essential and a noble gesture to serve others at a local or global level. That implies that the services rendered to the community can impact the residents positively or negatively. That is why understanding whether what you are doing, in the form of service, is a good or a bad thing. This is where ethical service comes in because it helps a service provider do what they think is right to self and those being served. This paper provides a discussion on why I think offering voluntary service to vulnerable communities is ethically important.

For the past 6 months, I have been working as a voluntary service provider affiliated with Holy Cross hospital, Baltimore. I believe that serving the vulnerable population is ethical because it helps them avoid the adverse and risky situations they face and feel the compassion that the service comes with. Vulnerable population refers to groups of people exposed to high risks and adverse effects within the residence community. In my service area, I deal with the elderly and individuals with various forms of disabilities that have rendered them helpless and in need of help from other people (Meyer et al. 2014). I believe that doing this to them I justified and ethical because ethical responsibilities define what is right and what is wrong.

The major considerations I put into this service to ensure it is an ethical practice are ensuring that the vulnerable populations I serve are protected through appropriate safeguards and relevant training is offered to all those involved in the partnership to help these people. This is an ethical act because it tends to ensure the entire community and partnerships are aware of the need to protect the elderly and people with disabilities (Salam et al. 2019). It is an ethical service provider practice because before joining the service, I took part in training and basic skill orientation to ensure that I handle the populations I serve with a lot of care. I consider it an ethical service because we provide the community and the populations we serve with long time benefits. The benefits we create to these people as direct volunteers entail ensuring that our interactions with the elderly and people with disabilities outweigh the stress and tough times we undergo to suppress our turnovers. For instance, I have worked within the Maryland community for close to two months, and I love the impact I have created on the people I serve.

It is also important to consider the aspect of privacy, dignity, and consent of the population I serve as a volunteer because it is ethical. That includes how I share information, images, and photos with the public. I have never done that without the consent of my clients. This is why I believe the services I provide are ethical.

References

Salam, M., Iskandar, D. N. A., Ibrahim, D. H. A., & Farooq, M. S. (2019). Service-learning in higher education: A systematic literature review. Asia Pacific Education Review20(4), 573-593.

Meyer, R. D., Dalal, R. S., José, I. J., Hermida, R., Chen, T. R., Vega, R. P., … & Khare, V. P. (2014). Measuring job-related situational strength and assessing its interactive effects with personality on voluntary work behavior. Journal of Management40(4), 1010-1041.

The Civic Action Scorecard

Take action. Keep score. Earn awards.

Created by the Institute for Civic Engagement & Democracy (iCED)

Miami Dade College

Miami, FL

For external inquiries or permission to use, please email [email protected]

Civic ActionPointsDocumentationReflection
DEMOCRATIC ENGAGEMENTPreparing you to take an active role in political processes
DE-1Register to vote or show proof that your registration is up to dateResource:www.mdc.edu/vote5 pointsPhoto of Voter Registration Card or screenshot of Board of Elections online registration checkNote: Blur out or cover information (other than your name) in your submissionReflect on the voter registration process. Was it smooth and easy or difficult and confusing? Was it fast or tedious? How might this process affect a person’s willingness to vote? Is there anything you would change about the process? Why is it important to vote?
DE-2Help someone register to voteResource:www.mdc.edu/vote5 pointsX2=10 points possiblePhoto with each person you helped registerReflect on the process of helping somebody register to vote. If someone were to ask you, “how do I register to vote?” what would you tell them? How might the voter registration process affect a person’s willingness and likelihood to vote?
DE-3Find the sample ballot for an upcoming local or state electionResource:Miami Dade Sample Ballots5 pointsDownload or print out from Board of Elections websiteReflect on the items on your sample ballot. What items make sense to you? What items confuse you? What resources are available to help you decode and make sense of the ballot items you do not understand? How will you make sure you are informed before you cast your vote in this election?
DE-4Create a voting plan for an upcoming electionResource:EngageMiami.Vote5 points per electionX3=15 points possibleSummarize (~200-400 words) how, where, and when you will vote for an upcoming electionReflect on the voting plan you created. Why did you choose this method (mail-in, early, or election day) over the other options? Explain why you would, or would not, recommend creating voting plan.
DE-5Attend, watch, or listen to a live candidate debate, legislative session, or citizen address (1.5 hrs. minimum)Examples:Local, state, or Presidential candidate debates, Florida House of Reps hearingCongressional session, State of the Union Address, etc.Watch/Listen: 5 pointsX2=10 points possible to watch/listenAttend: 10 pointsX2=20 points possible to attend in personWatch/Listen: Screenshot of meeting while live, or provide the link accessed for the live recordingAttend: Take a photo of yourself at meetingWatch/Listen: Reflect on the event. What did you learn? What topics of interest were covered? What did you observe on social dynamics, the process of decision-making, or the debate? What is your perspective on the topics discussed?Attend: Same as above.
DE-6Know your elected officials at city, county, state, and federal levelResources:WhoAreMyRepresentativesElected Officials Worksheet5 pointsProvide a list of all of your elected officials at the city, county, state, and federal level, and the office they each holdReflect on the names, photos, and backgrounds of your elected officials. Do you get a sense that these individuals are representative of you and your community? Why or why not? Why is it important to be aware of who our local elected officials are?
DE-7Research two of your current elected officials from #DE-610 pointsName and citation of websites/articles used plus research (~300-500 words total) of two of your local elected officials’ roles, length of their terms, and two issues that each official supportsReflect on your findings. Do you agree or disagree with the local elected officials on the issues they support? Were any issues ignored?
DE-8Call two of your elected officials from #DE-6 about an issue of concernResource:Contacting Elected Officials5 pointsX2=10 points possiblePhone number of officials called, date & time of phone call, name and role of person spoken to, and description (~100 words) of what you saidReflect on the process of contacting your elected officials via phone calls. Was it easier or harder, simpler or more complicated than what you expected? How do you feel about the way your call was handled by each office? Why do you think it is important to make your perspective on an issue known to your elected official?
DE-9Email one of your elected officials from #DE-6 about an issue of concern, in your own wordsResource:Contacting Elected Officials10 pointsCopy of email (~300-500 words) about an issue of concern in your own words, plus a screenshot of the sent email that includes original timestampReflect on the process of contacting your elected official via email. Was it easier or harder, simpler or more complicated than what you expected? How do you feel your email was handled? Why do you think it is important to make your perspective on this issue known to your elected official?
DE-10Report issue or concern in community to proper governmental authorityExamples: potholes, streetlights, illegal trash dumping, unsafe intersection, etc.Resource:City of Miami5 pointsX2=10 points possibleReported via portal or email: Photo of the issue you reported and copy of sent submissionReported via phone call: Photo of the issue you reported and phone number of the authority called, date & time of phone call, name and role of person spoken to, and description (~100 words) of what you saidReflect on the process of reporting an issue or concern. What was the issue? Who did you report it to? Has any action been taken yet and if so, what?
DE-11Research the most recent proposed or finalized budget from your city or countyResource:Miami-Dade County10 pointsCopy of research (~300-500 words plus citations) describing what the budget covers, when the next budget hearing is, and what the budget approval process is likeReflect on the budget and whether it considers the best interest of the community at large. Does it reflect your own sense of community needs? What changes, if any, would you like to see? How will you make your voice heard? Is the budget easy to find and understand?
DE-12Attend, watch, or listen to a live community, city, county, or state meeting (1.5 hrs. minimum)Examples:Neighborhood associations, budget forums, town halls, commission meetings, School Board meetings, etc.Watch/Listen:5 pointsX2=10 points possibleAttend: 10 pointsX2=20 points possible to attend in personWatch/Listen: Screenshot of meeting while live, or provide the link accessed for the live recording Attend: Take a photo of yourself at meetingWatch/Listen: Reflect on what you learned. What topics or issues addressed most interested you? Why? What did you notice about the way individuals and groups interacted with each other? What did you notice about the decision-making process on the topics discussed?Attend: Same as above
DE-13Present a prepared speech at a community, city, county, or state meetingExamples:Neighborhood associations, budget forums, town halls, commission meetings, School Board meetings, etc.Resource:How to Prepare & Make a Public Comment15 pointsPhoto of yourself, recording of yourself, or link to public record video with time of your speaking, and copy of speech (~200-400 words)Reflect on the process of preparing a speech and the experience of presenting it to public officials. What item did you comment on? What was it like to be able to speak directly to your neighbors and/or elected officials and/or other stakeholders in these decision-making processes?
DE-14Serve as a Miami Dade County Department of Elections Poll WorkerResource:Become a Poll Worker20 pointsSubmit proof of training and attendance, such as orientation paperwork and a photo of yourself at polling station (be sure to ask supervisor for where it is acceptable to take a photo)Reflect on this role. What was the process of signing up and being trained to serve? Why did you decide to serve as a poll worker? What did you learn during your experience? Why are poll workers significant to upholding a democracy?
DE-15Attend/participate in a workshop, training or informational event relating to democratic engagement (1 hr. minimum)Examples:Attend remotely:5 pointsX2=10 points possibleAttend: 10 pointsPhoto of yourself at event and/or receipt of admission with date, description of event (~100 words), and your role, if participatingReflect on the workshop, training, or event topic. What did you learn? How did it help you prepare to be active in political processes? Would you recommend it to a friend? Why or why not?National Voter Registration Day, Get Out the Vote, Women and the Vote, etc.Note:Contact your iCED office for suggestions www.mdc.edu/icedX2=20 points possible to attend in person
DE-16Sign at least 5 political, environmental, or social-issue petitions relating to causes you supportResources:Change.orgDoSomething.orgNote:Petitions may be signed over the course of one semester (~4 months)5 pointsScreenshot or photo of petitions signedReflect on each petition. Why did you choose it? How and where did you learn about and access this petition? What are your thoughts on petitions as a way to make positive changes in our communities?
DE-17Serve with a local or state political campaign (3 hr. minimum)Note:Does not qualify for service hours with iCED. See #CW-55 pointsDocumentation from service supervisor, such as a letter confirming service, a certificate of hours completed, or other evidence of service signed by a supervisor at service siteReflect on the campaign you chose, why it resonated with you, and what your experience serving with a political campaign taught you about democratic processes.
DE-18Join a local or state voter engagement organization or political party and attend at least 2 meetingsExamples:Young People’s Policy Priorities, Turning Point USA, League of15 points for attending 2 meetingsEvidence of joining voter/political engagement organization (official letter or email, membership card, etc.), photo of yourself at each meeting and/or receipt of attendance with date, and Women Voters, League of Conservation Voters, local/state political party, etc.Reflect on why you chose this organization, what issues were discussed at each meeting, and what you learned from each attendance.Extended reflection required: minimum reflection requirements must be met for each attendance.description of each meeting/event (~100 words)
DE-19Participate in an organized political debate* with someone with whom you disagree on a political, environmental, or social issue*Debate – a formal argument of opposing ideas on a subject with a public audience, usually with a selected judgeResource:Essential Partners: Debate and Dialogue Table (page 1)Examples:Political Science Club, Debate Club, part of a Speech or English course, etc.10 pointsCopy of debate notes and photo or recording of your participationReflect on the challenges and outcomes of this experience. What did you realize is the difference between debate and dialogue? What did you learn in preparation for your debate? What did you learn or realize during your debate? What is the role of debates in a democracy?
DE-20Attend a protest, rally, or demonstration with positive signage*positive signage – hand-made sign with a message supporting the issue and/or promoting hope or change10 pointsPhoto of yourself in attendance as well as any signs you chose to create or hold upReflect on your experience and role in attending. What issue did it center on? Why do you support this cause? What are some of your observations of the protest, rally, or demonstration you participated in? Why is the right to assemble and protest important in a democracy?
DE-21Write an op-ed or letter to the editor on a topic of local or societal importanceResource:Written and sent: 5 pointsPublished: 10 points Op-ed vs Letter to the EditorBonus:Additional 10 points if it is publishedCopy of letter (~300-500 words) and a screenshot of submission page (if submitted on a website) 15 points possibleReflect on the process of getting in touch with a media organization. What is the public’s responsibility to engage with the media?or screenshot of sent email message (if emailed to an editor)
DE-22Read two news articles from a reputable local or state news source on the same subject of at least 2 pages (~1,000 words) eachNote:Subject of articles should be at the intersection of political, environmental, or social issues5 points per two articlesX2=10 points possibleSummary (~200-400 words total) of both articles, and name and citation of each article readReflect on your personal connection to the issue and how the issue relates to your role as a resident in a democracy.
DE-23Summarize media fact-checking after reading about the process from PolitiFact.com and FactCheck.org5 pointsSummary (~200-400 words total) of how both organizations check facts and description of “fact-checking” in your own wordsReflect on what was learned about the process of fact-checking. How will this help you stay informed when consuming media in the future?
DE-24Summarize two fact-checked claims made by local, state, or federal officialsResources:PolitiFact.comFactCheck.org5 points per 2 claimsX2=10 points possibleSummary of the claims that were fact-checked (~200 words per fact, ~400 words total) including who made them, when, and to whomReflect on the importance and impact of local, state, and federal officials sharing correct information to the public.
DE-25Help stop the spread of “Fake News”:Review the SIFT method and verify a news story that has been shared on social media10 pointsSummary (~200-400 words) of the SIFT method, the news story that was verified, whether it was true or false, and link/citation to the social media postReflect on what was learned from using the SIFT method for verifying news. Describe the implications of sharing unverified information on social media. Will this change how you consume and share media? How?Resources:SIFT MethodSIFT Through MisinformationDaily Examples of SIFT
DE-26Read and summarize a United States founding documentResources:Preamble to the ConstitutionBill of RightsDeclaration of IndependenceEssay from the Federalist Papers5 pointsX2=10 points possibleSummary (~200-400 words) of the document read and citation. Link to where the full text of the document was accessed digitally, or photo if you have a hard copyReflect on a founding document and the era in which it was written. What did freedom mean during this time, and who was free? How were those freedoms expanded to more people over the years? How does this document influence your life today?
DE-27Take practice Citizenship Exam with passing scoreResource:USCIS: Civics Practice Test5 pointsScreenshot of your score (appears once you finish the 20 questions) showing 80% or higherReflect on the questions from the practice test. What are your thoughts on the topics naturalized citizens are required to learn about? Did any question or topic surprise you? Are any questions or topics missing? Do you agree or disagree with the concept of a citizenship exam?
ENVIRONMENT & SUSTAINABILITYDiscovering your role within the story of Earth
ES-1Know the native plants of your communityResources:Florida-friendly Plant DatabaseFlorida’s Wild Edible Plants5 pointsProvide list of 10 diverse native plants (including flowers, shrubs, trees, vines, grasses, and/or food plants) and citation of sourcesReflect on your experience and familiarity with native plants in your community. Which native or invasive plants to you encounter most often? What are some potential reasons for this?
ES-2Plant a South Florida native species and maintain it for 3 monthsExamples:Native flowers, shrubs, trees, vines, grasses, and/or food plantsResources:Florida-friendly Plant DatabaseFlorida’s Wild Edible Plants20 pointsBefore photo of the space planted and weekly photo of the plant’s progressReflect on your experience having to maintain native plant life. Why was this plant chosen? What are this native plant’s needs to thrive (water, food, soil, light, etc.)? What special role does this plant play in its natural ecosystem? Were there any challenges?Extended reflection required: minimum reflection requirements must be met 1x a week throughout experience
ES-3Attend a farmer’s market and try local and/or seasonal foods and products (1 hr. minimum)Resource:South Florida Farmer’s Markets10 pointsName and location of farmer’s market, date attended, and photo of yourself attendingReflect on your observations during your visit to the farmer’s market. How did the options compare to your usual grocery store? How do the prices compare? Why would someone choose to go to a farmer’s market instead of a traditional grocery store?
ES-4Review the 17 United Nations Sustainable Development Goals and watch ‘We the People’ For the Global Goals”Resources:United Nations Sustainable Development Goals‘We the People’ for Global Goals video5 pointsSummary (~200-400 words) of the UN SDGs (Sustainable Development Goals) and name and citation of UN SDG website usedReflect on the website and video. Which two goals most interest you? Why do you feel those two goals are most relevant to you and your community?
ES-5Complete the UN Sustainable Communities ChecklistResource:UN Sustainable Communities Checklist5 pointsScreenshot of completed checklist. Name/citation of sources used for information to complete checklistReflect on the sustainability of your community. Answer the three reflection questions from the bottom of checklist. What do you think the checklist leaves out, should include, or could clarify?
ES-6Complete the Miami Water Keepers quiz & read the included article ‘Best Management Practices’Note:Article at the end of the quizResource:Miami Water Keepers Quiz5 pointsScreenshot of quiz resultsReflect on your relationship to water. What are best practices for managing your water usage? How do you plan to improve on your water usage? How can residents improve the water quality of where they live?
ES-7Calculate your slavery footprintResource:Slavery Footprint CalculatorNote:This site works best on a desktop or laptop computer5 pointsScreenshot of slavery footprint resultsReflect on the factors that contribute to your slavery footprint. Were you surprised by the impact your consumption has on others? Why is it important for people to reflect on their slavery footprint? If more people understood their slavery footprint, what could change? What will you do differently as a result of this action?
ES-8Calculate your carbon footprintResources:EPA Carbon Footprint CalculatorNature Conservancy Carbon Footprint Calculator5 pointsScreenshot of carbon footprint resultsReflect on the factors that contribute to your carbon footprint. Were you surprised by some of the activities that had larger or smaller impacts than expected? What was your reaction to learning your carbon footprint? If more people understood their carbon footprint, do you think anything would change?
ES-9Research two contributors to a carbon footprint from #ES-8Examples:Food production/consumption, energy consumption, plastic or electronics production and waste, water consumption and waste, transportation, etc.10 pointsName and citation of websites/articles used plus research (~300-500 words total) on two contributors to a carbon footprintReflect on the role of these carbon contributors in your own life. What would it take for you to substantially reduce them or eliminate them from your life? What would be the impact if everybody substantially reduced or eliminated these carbon contributors? Is that feasible? Why or why not?
ES-10Watch two videos from “The Story of Stuff” series by Annie LeonardResource:Story of Stuff videos5 points for each two videos watchedX3=15 points possibleDescription (~100 words) of each video’s content and name and citation of each video watchedReflect on the topic addressed. How does consumption relate to your role as a global citizen? What changes are you inspired to make after watching the Story of Stuff Videos? Why?
ES-11Clean up trash in your neighborhood, at a public park, or near the water (1.5 hrs. minimum)Note:Does not qualify for service hours with iCED. Refer to CW-6 for service hours with iCED10 pointsBefore and after photos of the area and trash collectedReflect on the trash collected during this activity. What items did you most collect? Who or what do you believe is most responsible for trash in public places?
ES-12Properly recycle household electronics, computer and printer accessories, and/or batteries after reading about e-waste on PBS or Recycle NationResources:10 pointsName and location of organization you recycled with. Photo of items at donation site and/or receipt from organization, and name and citation of websites/articles readReflect on your experience recycling these items. Have you recycled them in the past? Why or why not? What are the impacts of electronic waste and batteries on the environment and humans?PBS: Where does America’s e-waste end up? GPS tracker tells allRecycle Nation: Where does e-waste end up?Miami-Dade County Chemical Collection Centers
ES-13Properly dispose of household chemicals, hazardous waste, and/or cleaning supplies after reading about household hazardous waste from the EPAResource:EPA Household Hazardous Waste InformationMiami-Dade County Chemical Collection Centers10 pointsName and location of organization you recycled with. Photo of items at disposal site and/or receipt from organization, and name and citation of websites/articles readReflect on your experience properly disposing of these items. Have you properly disposed of them in the past? Why or why not? What are the impacts of household waste and cleaning supply runoff on the environment and humans?
ES-14Eliminate consumption of meat, fish, & animal byproducts (like eggs, milk, cheese) for 7 continuous daysResource:WikiHow: How to Keep a Food Diary15 pointsSubmission of 7-day food diary, photos of plant-based meals, and links to plant-based recipes used, if applicableReflect on your experience changing your eating habits. What came easy to you? What was challenging? Did you learn anything about yourself that surprised you? What are the impacts of animal product consumption on the environment and humans? How are the animals themselves treated?
ES-15Reduce your home energy use for 30 continuous days and by a minimum 10%15 pointsScreenshots or photos of your prior and current year energy bills for the same month reflecting a reduction of energy use by a minimum of 10%Example: screenshot of your July 2019 and July 2020 energy bills reflecting at least a 10% decrease Note: Blur out or cover confidential account information in your submissionReflect on the specific changes you made to reduce your home energy use. How did these changes affect your daily household life? Any surprises or recommendations that other people could easily incorporate?Extended reflection required: minimum reflection requirements must be met 2x a week throughout experiencedecrease from the same month of the previous yearExample:Reduce energy use from July 1 – 31, 2020 resulting in a 10% decrease from your July 2019 billResource:FPL: Top Energy Saving Tips
ES-16Eliminate consumption of single-use plastic (water bottles, bags, straws, utensils, etc.) for 7 continuous daysResource:EPA: Ten Ways to Unpackage Your Life15 pointsSubmission of a 7-day diary describing the single-use plastic products eliminated, and list and/or photos of substitutions usedReflect on your experience changing your consumption habits. Were you surprised by how many items in your daily life are made from single-use plastic? What steps will you take to ensure continued use of reusable items? What are the impacts of single-use plastic on the environment and on humans?Extended reflection required: minimum reflection requirements must be met 3x a week throughout experience
ES-17Reduce your transportation footprint for 7 continuous days by relying exclusively on public transit* and/or self-powered transportation***public transit – bus, train, trolley, etc. No ridesharing such as Uber/Lyft, no carpooling, or any other car use**self-powered transportation – walking, bicycling, skating, etc.15 pointsDates public transit was used and a daily photo using public transit or daily receipts from transit company; dates self-powered transportation was used and daily photos using those methodsReflect on your experience reducing your transportation footprint. Were all the places you normally visit accessible? How does the built infrastructure in your city or county support or hinder public transit use? How does the landscape in your community affect the safe mobility of non-drivers? What are the impacts of private vehicles on the environment?Extended reflection required: minimum reflection requirements must be met 3x a week throughout experienceResource:C2ES: Reducing Your Transportation Footprint
ES-18Attend/participate in MDC or community-led workshop, training or informational event relating to environment and sustainability (1 hr. minimum)Note:Contact your Earth Ethics Institute (EEI) office for detailsExamples:1000 Eyes on the Water, EEI-sponsored events, etc.Attend remotely: 5 pointsX2=10 points possibleAttend: 10 pointsX2=20 points possible to attend in personPhoto of yourself at event, receipt of admission with date, brief description of event (~100 words), and your role, if participatingReflect on the workshop, training, or event topic. What did you learn? How did it help you understand your role in the story of Earth? What actions are you inspired to take because of attending or participating?
COMMUNITY WELL-BEINGContributing to the positive or healthy development of members of your community
CW-1Complete a Significant Act of Kindness that can be documented in a photo or recordingResource:Positive Psychology: Random Acts of Kindness5 pointsX3=15 points possiblePhoto or recording of the act of kindness and summary (~200-400 words) of the act of kindness that was completedReflect on significant acts of kindness. Why did you choose this action and the person who received it? How did it feel to complete this act? What makes an act of kindness significant?
CW-2Donate non-perishable food to the MDC Food Pantry for Students or local foodbank valuing at least $5Resource:MDC: Food Pantries5 pointsX2=10 points possiblePhoto of yourself with food donations and receipt from pantry or food bankReflect on experience of donating food. How did it feel to donate to a food pantry? Why are food donations needed in your community? What impact does food insecurity have on the positive or healthy development of your community?
CW-3Donate in kind* to a local or state nonprofit or organization valuing at least $5*In kind: non-monetary donations like clothing, furniture, household goods, etc.5 pointsPhoto of yourself with in-kind donations and receipt from nonprofit or organizationReflect on the experience of in-kind donating. How did it feel to donate your personal items? Where would your personal items have ended up if they were not donated? What impact can in-kind donations have on the positive or healthy development of your community, or on the environment?
CW-4Fundraise over $50 for a nonprofit organization through a single event or ongoing campaignNote:Fundraiser must engage multiple donors (minimum of 5), and funds may not be raised exclusively from a single donor or exclusively from your family, friends, or club15 pointsPhoto or recording of you raising funds, the date(s), time(s), and location(s) of fundraiser, and documentation (receipt) that the funds were delivered to the organizationReflect on the process of fundraising. Why was this organization chosen to receive funds? What impact does this organization have on positive or healthy development in your community? What challenges or successes did you experience while leading a fundraising event or campaign?
CW-5Serve with a local or state nonprofit (5 hr. minimum)Note:Service required for student club is acceptable; service-learning required for a course grade is acceptable only with course instructor permission2.5 points per every 5 hours, up to 15 points (round points to next whole number)Documentation from service supervisor such as signed service-learning or volunteer hours log, letter from nonprofit agency, etc.Note: Service must meet iCED’s Standards for Service. Submit service hours to iCEDReflect on your service. Which organization did you serve with and why? What activities did you participate in and what did you learn during your experience? Did anything surprise or disappoint you?Extended reflection required: minimum reflection requirements must be met for every 5 hours served
CW-6Serve in a national or international day of serviceExamples:MLK Day of Service, 9/11 Day of Service and Remembrance, Global Youth Service Day, etc.2.5 points per every 5 hours, up to 15 points (round points to next whole number)Documentation from service supervisor such as signed service-learning or volunteer hours log, letter from nonprofit agency, etc. Note: Service must meet iCED’s Note: Service must meet iCED’s Note: Service must meet iCED’s Note: Service must meet iCED’s Note: Service must meet iCED’sReflect on your participation on this day of service. What is the history of the day? What organization did you serve with, and how is it related to this day of service? What did you learn during your experience? Did anything surprise or disappoint you?Extended reflection required: minimum reflection requirements must be met for every 5 hours servedNote:Cannot be completed in conjunction with serving a local or state nonprofit (#CW-6). Service required for student club is acceptable; service-learning required for a course grade is acceptable only with course instructor permission
CW-7Serve on community board or committee (10-hour minimum)Examples:Commission for Women, the Children’s Trust, Engage Miami, etc.15 pointsProof of Board or committee appointment. Photo of yourself at meetingsReflect on your participation with the community board or committee. What activities did you participate in? How are they related to the overall mission of the board or committee? How does this board or committee contribute to the positive or healthy development of members of your community?Extended reflection required: minimum reflection requirements must be met for every 5 hours served
CW-8Complete an STI and HIV testNote:Results are not required for documentation or reflection10 pointsName and location where both tests were taken. Proof of test being taken, including dateNote: results not required for documentation. Blur out or cover confidential medical information in your submissionReflect on the experience of getting tested. Why is there a need for STI and HIV testing in your community? What impact does testing have on the positive or healthy development of your community?Note: results are not needed for reflection
CW-9Donate blood or plasma10 pointsName of donation organization and location where donation was made. Proof of donation, including date Note: Blur out or cover confidential medical information in your submissionReflect on the experience of donating blood or plasma. How did it feel to donate a part of yourself? Why is there a need for blood and plasma donation in your community? What impact does donating have on the positive or healthy development of your community?
CW-10Donate bone marrow30 pointsName of donation organization and location where donation was made. Proof of donation, including dateNote: Blur out or cover confidential medical information in your submissionReflect on the experience of donating bone marrow. How did it feel to donate a part of yourself? Why is there a need for bone marrow donation in your community? What impact does donating have on your community?
CW-11Have a deliberative dialogue* with someone with whom you disagree on a political, environmental, or social issue*Dialogue = seeking to understand the other person’s point of view, and helping him/her understand yours, done with respect, civility, and a desire to find common groundResource:Essential Partners: Debate and Dialogue Table (page 1-9)10 pointsDate, time, and location of dialogue, relationship to other person engaged in dialogue, and a list of questions used to guide dialogueReflect on the experience of having a deliberative dialogue. Why was the issue for dialogue chosen? What did you learn about the other person’s perspective on the issue? How did deliberative dialogue help you find mutual understanding on the issue? What importance does dialogue have towards the positive or healthy development of your community?
CW-12Host a neighborhood or community meeting for an authentic audience* to discuss an issue of community relevance (1 hr. minimum)15 pointsPhoto of yourself at meeting, photo/screenshot of materials used to advertise the meeting, and copy of the meeting agenda with date, time, and locationNote: Blur out or cover faces/info of other attendees if neededReflect on the experience of bringing people together. Why was the selected issue discussed? What resolutions or actions resulted from the meeting? What challenges or successes did you experience while completing the action? What feedback did you get from people who attended?*Authentic audience: must benefit from the information presented, and must engage multiple and diverse people (minimum of 5) who may not be exclusively from your family, friends, class, or clubExample:10 Days of Connection, each summer
CW-13Complete a “Community Well-Being Certification” (1 hr. minimum)Examples:Mental Health, First Aid, CPR, Suicide Prevention, etc.Note:MDC Student Wellness Resources or contact iCED for upcoming certifications15 pointsX2=30 points possibleName of certifying organization, date and location of training or certification, and photo/screenshot of certification of completionReflect on what you learned while completing your certification. What is the importance of this certification and why did you choose it? What challenges or successes did you have while completing it? How will this certification prepare you to contribute to the positive or healthy development of your community?
CW-14Attend/participate in a workshop, training, or informational event relating to community well-being or a social issue (1 hr. minimum)Examples:Public health, housing, public transit, public education, civic engagement expo etc.Attend remotely:5 pointsX2=10 points possibleAttend: 10 pointsX2=20 points possible to attend in personPhoto of yourself at event, receipt of admission with date, brief description of event (~100 words), and your role, if participatingReflect on the topic addressed. What new knowledge or skills were learned? How did the workshop, training, or informational event help you prepare to contribute to the positive and/or healthy development of your community?
CW-15Present a workshop, training, or informational event on an issue of political, environmental, or social significance to an authentic audience* through a single event or ongoing campaign*Authentic audience: must benefit from the information presented, and must engage multiple and diverse people (minimum of 5) who may not be exclusively from your family, friends, class, or clubNote:Presentation must include factual, cited information, and include a call-to-action or proposed solution15 pointsPhoto or recording of you conducting the presentation, a summary (~200-400 words plus citations) of the issue and call to action you presented, and the date, time, and location of the presentationReflect on the issue you presented on. What about this issue inspired you to conduct a workshop, training, or informational event? How did others react to the information you presented? Describe your process for preparing the presentation and your feelings about implementing the presentation. How did this action contribute to the positive and/or healthy development of your community?
CW-16Participate in MDC campus or community leadership or fellowship program in its entirety (10-hour minimum)Examples:Andrew Goodman Foundation Ambassador, Campus Election Engagement Fellow, GSELS Scholar Recognition, Global Ambassadors, Year Up, CLEAR and HEAL Academies, Community Leadership Forum, etc.30 pointsName of host organization, location, dates, and times of seminar or fellowship program, and photo/screenshot of proof of completion or capstone projectReflect on the leadership or fellowship program. What about this program inspired you to participate? What topics were discussed in the program? What skills were learned or enhanced? What did you contribute to the program? What have you learned about how completing this program will contribute to the positive and/or healthy development of your community?Extended reflection required: Minimum reflection requirements must be met for every 5 hours of participation and up to 20 hours in total (no more than 4 reflections)
ARTS & CULTUREDiscovering how the arts strengthen and enrich our communities
AC-1Watch a film or documentary about a political, environmental, social, or cultural issue (1.5 hours minimum)5 pointsX2=10 points possibleSummary (~200-400 words plus citation) of film in your own wordsReflect on the film or documentary. What did you learn? What feelings came up while watching it? How was the topic portrayed uniquely through film compared to other mediums (audio, written, etc.)? How can film strengthen and enrich our communities?
AC-2Read a nonfiction or fiction book about a political, environmental, social, or cultural issue of at least 100 pagesBonus: Additional 5 points for a banned/challenged book with added documentation and reflectionResource: American Library Association Banned & Challenged Book ListNonfiction or fiction book: 15 pointsBanned/challenged book: 5 points20 points possibleSummary (~200-400 words plus citation) of book in your own wordsAdditional documentation for banned/challenge book: Briefly describe (~100 words plus citations) why the book was banned or challengedReflect on the topic addressed. What did you learn? What feelings came up while reading it? How was the topic portrayed uniquely through writing compared to other mediums (audio, film, etc.)? How can literary arts and storytelling strengthen and enrich our communities?Added reflection for banned/challenge book: Reflect on the content of the book that made it banned or challenged. How do you feel about that content? Why or why not is freedom of expression through books important?
AC-3Research the indigenous people and tribe(s) of your community using your zip code with Native LandResource: Native Land Map10 pointsNames and location of each tribe of your community, research (~300-500 words plus citations) on the indigenous tribe(s) to include a brief summary of their history and whether they are active in your community todayNote: select up to two tribes to researchReflect on what you learned about the indigenous people and tribe(s) of your community. What surprised you about their historical background and/or current activity in your community today? Why is it important to know about the indigenous tribes of our communities?
AC-4Create a land acknowledgement for the indigenous people and tribe(s) of your community from #AC-3Resources:Native Governance Center’s Land AcknowledgementWhose Land VideosBonus:Additional 5 points for presenting land acknowledgement to an authentic audienceCreate: 5 pointsPresent: 5 points if presented to an authentic audience10 points possibleCreate: Copy of land acknowledgement (~200-400 words plus citations)Present: Photo or recording of you presenting the land acknowledgement plus description (~100 words) of the event and audience you presented toCreate: Reflect on land acknowledgements. What did you learn about their significance? Describe your process of writing a land acknowledgement for the indigenous tribe(s) of your community. How has this activity impacted how you understand the strength of culture of your community?Present: How did others react to the information you presented? How did this action contribute to the strengthening and/or enrichment of your community?
AC-5Visit a state park, museum, or site of cultural significance**cultural significance – a site with historic, scientific, social, or spiritual valueResources:Visit Miami Museums for FreeHistoric Places to Visit in MiamiHistoric Treasures in Homestead & Florida City10 pointsX2=20 points possiblePhoto of yourself at site, receipt of admission with date, description (~100 words) of site, and name and location of siteReflect on the site you visited. What about this site inspired you to visit? What did you learn? What feelings came up during your visit? How did this visit inform or impact the connection you have with your community?
AC-6Join a community art or cultural collective and attend 2 meetings/events10 points for 2 meetingsEvidence of joining art or cultural collective (official letter or email, membership card, etc.), photo of yourself at each meeting and/or receipt of attendance with date, and description of each meeting/event (~100 words)Reflect on the collective you joined. What about this collective inspired you to join? What topics were presented at each meeting/event? What did you learn about the arts and your community’s culture from joining? What contributions did your membership and presence bring to the collective?Extended reflection required: Minimum reflection requirements must be met for each meeting/event attended.Examples:“O, Miami,” Miami Film Society, book club, Miami-Dade Group Rides, etc.
AC-7Attend/participate in MDC Live Arts program (1.5 hrs. minimum)Example:ECOCultura, artist-in-residence project, etc.Resource:MDCLiveArts.org10 pointsX2=20 points possiblePhoto of yourself at program, receipt of admission with date, brief description of event (~100 words), and your role, if participatingReflect on the topic addressed. What new knowledge or skills were learned? How did the program help you understand how the arts strengthen and enrich our communities?
AC-8Attend/participate in a local arts or cultural fair/festival (1.5 hrs. minimum)Examples:Miami Book Fair, Miami Film Festival, Asian Culture Festival, O, Miami Poetry Festival etc.10 pointsX2=20 points possiblePhoto of yourself at program, receipt of admission with date, brief description of event (~100 words), and your role, if participatingReflect on the fair or festival. What about it inspired you to attend or participate? What new knowledge or skills were learned? How did attending or participating help you understand how an arts or cultural fair/festival can strengthen and enrich our communities?
AC-9Present original art* for an authentic audience** on a political, environmental, or social issue*Art: 2D, 3D, or performance art, plus a call-to-action or proposed solution**Authentic audience: must benefit from the message presented, and must engage15 pointsPhoto or recording of art, the date, time, and location of your presentation, a summary (~200-400 words plus citations) of the issue presented, and description of audienceReflect on the issue you presented on. What about this issue inspired you to conduct an educational campaign? How did others react to the information you presented? How do you think creating original art can strengthen and enrich our communities?multiple and diverse people (minimum of 5) who may not be exclusively from your family, friends, class, or club
SOCIAL INNOVATIONDeveloping solutions to challenging issues in support of social progress
SI-1Review solutions journalism by visiting Solutions Journalism Network and reading the internal “Who We Are” and “Our Impact” pagesResource:SolutionsJournalism.org5 pointsSummary (~200-400) of solutions journalismReflect on solutions journalism. How can solutions journalism be used to promote social innovation and progress? Describe how understanding the solutions journalism framework will or will not change how you will interact with journalism or media in the future.
SI-2Read two articles on the same subject from SolutionsU at least 2 pages (~1,000 words) eachResource:Solutions Journalism U5 points for reading two articlesX2=10 points possibleSummary (~200-400 words total) of both articles, and name and citation of each article readReflect on the subject addressed and solutions journalism. What are your thoughts about the subject? What did you learn? How was the subject portrayed uniquely through solutions journalism compared to other media?
SI-3Watch two TED Talks on the same subjectNote:Subject should be at the intersection of political, environmental, or social issuesResource:TED.com5 points for watching two TED TalksX2=10 points possibleSummary (~200-400 words total) of both TED Talks and name and citation of each TED Talk watchedReflect on the subject addressed. In what ways is it innovative? What did you learn? How does it relate to your own experiences and community? What action are you inspired to take after learning about the subject or innovation?
SI-4Attend/participate in social innovation or social entrepreneurship workshop, training, or informational event (1.5 hrs. minimum)Examples:Hackathon, Codeathon, Design Thinking, etc.Resources:Idea Center at MDCVenture Café MiamiAttend remotely:5 pointsX2=10 points possibleAttend: 10 pointsX2=20 points possible to attend in personPhoto at event, receipt of admission with date, brief description of event (~100 words), and your role, if participatingReflect on the workshop, training, or event topic. What did you learn? What personal challenges were overcome during the event? What innovative ideas or ways of thinking you were exposed to? How did the event help you understand the need for solutions for social progress?
SI-5Submit a Commitment to Action to Clinton Global Initiative UniversityNote: application open each fall semesterResource:Apply to CGI UBonus:Additional 15 points if Commitment to Action is accepted and CGI U program is completed to graduationApply: 15 pointsAccepted and graduated from CGI U program: 15 points30 points possibleApply: Submit copy of the Commitment to ActionAccepted and graduated from CGI U program: Submit official documentation of graduation from CGI UApply: Reflect on the issue addressed by your Commitment to Action. What about this issue inspired you to apply? Describe your process for preparing the Commitment to Action. What went well? What would you do differently next time?Accepted and graduated from CGI U program: Reflect on the CGI U program. What did you learn about yourself? Did you gain any new insights on the issue addressed by your Commitment to Action? What was challenging? What went better than expected?
SI-6Apply to a community solutions or social innovation grant or micro grantExamples:Apply: 15 pointsAccepted and implemented: 15 points30 points possibleApply: Submit copy of application and provide link to the grant overviewAccepted and implemented: Evidence of grant being implemented 1x a week throughout implementation stage (before/after photos, testimonies, etc.)Apply: Reflect on the issue addressed by your grant application. What about this issue inspired you to apply? Describe your process for preparing the grant application. What went well? What would you do differently next time?Accepted and implemented: Reflect on the process of implementation. What did you learn about yourself? Did you gain any new insights on the issue addressed by your grant? What was challenging? What went better than expected?Extended reflection required: minimum reflection requirements must be met 1x a week throughout grant implementationThe Awesome FoundationEmerging Cities ChampionMiami Foundation, etc.Bonus:Additional 15 points if grant is accepted and implemented
PROPOSE YOUR OWN CIVIC ACTION Encouraging you to find your own pathway to civic action
PY-1Propose your own Civic Action Item to iCED5-15 points depending on actionContact your iCED office and propose a “Civic Action” that is not on this list (must be pre-approved by iCED)
PY-2Course instructor assigned Civic Action Item5-15 points depending on actionDocumentation assigned by course instructor

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