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Assignment 1

Conduct research on an event of your choice, either online or by attending a local event. Prepare a report of approximately of 700-1000 words related to this event. Make sure to describe the three aspects of event management presented in this Module. 

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 Event Objective (10 points) 

 Food and Beverage (10 points) 

 Strategic Planning (10 points) 

Assignment 2

A Fortune 500 Corporation has selected your company to create their 100th anniversary celebration. This history-making event will be held on one day, and encompass three-different activities and venues – an employee business meeting, celebration activities and a gala dinner. Prepare a report of approximately of 1000 words describing how you will plan this event. Use the following topics as guidelines: 

 Understanding objectives (10 points) 

 Selecting venues (10 points) 

 Catering for the gala dinner (10 points) 

 Ground transportation to and from events (10 points) 

 Assessment of any risks associated with the event (10 points) 

Assignment 3

Attend a local event (social or corporate). Write a brief report on the event describing details such as event type, venue, décor, invitations and food. State your impressions of the event, in terms of the following: 

 Things that were well planned and things that were not well organized (10 points) 

 Explain in detail the elements that were not planned well and describe how you would improve on them to make the event better (10 points) 

See attachment

Copyright © 2012 International Institute of Event Management (SM). All Rights Reserved.

CERTIFICATE PROGRAM IN EVENT MANAGEMENT

MODULE TWO

FUNDAMENTALS OF EVENT PLANNING

INTERNATIONAL INSTITUTE OF EVENT MANAGEMENT

Copyright © 2012 International Institute of Event Management (SM). All Rights Reserved.

Copyright © 2012 International Institute of Event Management (SM). All Rights Reserved.

MODULE TWO: FUNDAMENTALS OF EVENT PLANNING …………………….. 1

EVENT OBJECTIVES ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 2

STRATEGIC PLANNING ………………………………………………………………………………………….. 4

EVENT VENUE …………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 7

VENUE DESIGN …………………………………………………………………………………………………. 14

CONTRACTS ………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 18

INVITATIONS …………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 22

FOOD & BEVERAGE ……………………………………………………………………………………………. 24

RISK MANAGEMENT …………………………………………………………………………………………… 27

MODULE TWO: ASSIGNMENTS ……………………………………………………………………………… 36

1 Copyright © 2012 International Institute of Event Management (SM). All Rights Reserved.

MODULE TWO: FUNDAMENTALS OF EVENT PLANNING

2 Copyright © 2012 International Institute of Event Management (SM). All Rights Reserved.

FAILURE IS SIMPLY THE OPPORTUNITY TO BEGIN AGAIN, THIS TIME MORE INTELLIGENTLY – Henry Ford

EVENT OBJECTIVES

n event manager produces a wide variety of events from birthdays to

meetings to conferences. Regardless of the type, there are some basic

elements that apply to every event, though their details may vary. This

section covers these basics and answers the most fundamental questions:

what, why, and where?

Every event is planned for a reason. It is absolutely critical to determine and understand

the objective to be achieved at the end of the event. The SMART methodology is a

good approach to setting objectives. Every objective must meet the SMART criteria:

 S – Specific

 M – Measurable

 A – Achievable

 R – Realistic

 T – Time bound

What questions must be asked to ensure that the objectives are SMART? Here’s a

sample of questions we’ve used in planning actual events:

A

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 Is the purpose of the themed party to celebrate Halloween or Mardi Gras?

 Who will be on the guest list and how does that affect the decor and activities?

 What age group will be attending the event?

 In planning a birthday party or an anniversary party, do you know the likes and

dislikes of the people for whom it is being organized?

 Is this corporate event for the purpose of increasing sales figures or for employee

motivation?

OBJECTIVES & ROI

One area increasingly coming to the forefront of ROI (Return on Investment)

discussions is meetings. Executive management teams require specific measurable

results for their meetings and incentive programs. Return on Investment is a percentage

of the net profit of an event over the investment. This is a standard computation that

takes into account the amount of money spent on the event compared to the sales or

estimated value the organization has received as a direct result of the event.

However, the real story lies beyond the numbers. While many event planners measure

the success of an event by staying within budgetary guidelines and assessing

attendance satisfaction, corporations measure its success by whether or not the event

has met its objectives and what business impact was generated from this individual

event. A complete evaluation of the event, both from the organization’s and the

participants’ point of view, must be included with the financial calculations in order to

give stakeholders a true reflection of the outcome of the event.

4 Copyright © 2012 International Institute of Event Management (SM). All Rights Reserved.

For example, your CEO or vice president of

sales might ask, “What is our company’s ROI for

the national sales meeting?” In recent years, a

familiar answer, “We’ve motivated the team to

sell,” is no longer considered a measurable

result. Further, meetings and events are two

distinctly different disciplines, but events are also

moving more into quantitative and qualitative

ROI measurement.

Instead of stating goals and objectives in vague

and abstract terms like “guests having a good

time,” consider using quantifiable measurement

tools, such as attendance goals, satisfaction

surveys, sales leads generated, increase in

employee satisfaction – in more simple terms,

you cannot control or improve on things you do

not measure.

STRATEGIC PLANNING

Strategic planning for your meeting is an important early step in the planning process.

You already know that planning a meeting or an event involves scads of details.

However, a timeline is not just one big to-do list. In fact, it’s quite different. A good

timeline will identify key tasks and dates and keep your priorities straight. Most

CONSIDER THIS..

Instead of stating goals

and objectives in vague

and abstract terms like

“guests having a good

time,” consider using

quantifiable measurement

tools, such as attendance

goals, satisfaction surveys,

sales leads generated,

increase in employee

satisfaction – in more

simple terms, you cannot

control or improve on things

you do not measure.

5 Copyright © 2012 International Institute of Event Management (SM). All Rights Reserved.

importantly, it will factor in the time you need to make sound decisions. Timelines are as

unique to an individual meeting as the people who create them. Your planning tasks

differ from meeting to meeting. They are also different depending on whether you are

planning a corporate, association, nonprofit, or business meeting or event, and so on.

Effective timelines must be customized to each unique situation.

One important question is “When do I begin finalizing the planning process in earnest?”

The answer is “When you have a confirmed date and venue.” This is because these two

elements determine almost all of your other decisions such as marketing, selecting

speakers, catering, transportation, budgets, and so on. Before we go any further,

however, realize that there are instances when you know for a fact you are doing a

meeting, you just don’t know the exact dates or location. You can and should develop a

timeline that includes your RFP process, site selection, and the associated decisions.

This is especially important for annual meetings, when you are preparing for them

months in advance.

It is a good idea to apply a category to each of your tasks. Here is a sampling of

categories:

 Audio-visual

 Budget

 Communications

 Exhibits

 Hotel or site

 Mailings

6 Copyright © 2012 International Institute of Event Management (SM). All Rights Reserved.

 Marketing

 Printing

 Programming

 Public relations

 Registration

 Speakers

 Supplies

 Transportation

 Vendors

Another planning suggestion is to identify a milestone first and then add the specific

tasks about that milestone. For example, decide when your first promotional

marketing piece needs to be mailed. Then determine what kind of mailer it is, what it

says, what it looks like (logos, colors, printing), how many other promotional pieces

you need, their mailing dates, and so on. By placing the critical element on the

timeline before scheduling the associated details, you can ensure that you have

allowed enough time to get them all done.

The planning process does not end with the start of your program. There will be

important details to follow up on after your program is completed. You must write thank

you letters to all vendors, helpful site staff, sponsors, committee members, planning

staff, and many more in a timely manner. You will need to review all invoices, see that

they are paid, and review/tabulate your meeting evaluation(s). Be sure to schedule

7 Copyright © 2012 International Institute of Event Management (SM). All Rights Reserved.

these tasks so they are completed as soon as possible after your meeting. Never

consider your timeline complete, until these tasks are complete.

EVENT VENUE

Choosing a venue is one of the most critical early planning stages of any event, be it a

wedding, a birthday party, or a corporate event. The location must be chosen as early

as possible, and it is the most difficult element to change once the event execution

begins.

VENUE BASICS

In selecting a venue, the first choice is between an indoor and an outdoor location.

When considering an outdoor venue, be sure to check the weather conditions. Poor

weather may require the use of tents, heating, or an alternate location. For indoor

events, the choices include hotels, conventions centers, community centers,

restaurants, museums, public parks, and private homes.

8 Copyright © 2012 International Institute of Event Management (SM). All Rights Reserved.

Before deciding on a venue, determine how many guests are expected to attend the

event. The answer to this question alone will help to narrow down the options. Once you

have selected the venue and checked its availability, the next step is to prepare a

checklist of facility questions:

 Does the venue have the capacity to accommodate all the guests?

 Is there a separate breakfast/lunch area for serving food?

 Is there adequate parking for all the guests? Is the parking free? If not, what is

the parking fee?

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 Is there Wi-Fi and Internet access for attendees within the facility?

 Are the meeting areas equipped with audio/visual setup? Is this included in the

rental?

 Does the facility provide an audiovisual expert on the day of the event?

 Does the facility allow banners to be put up at the location? Are there any

restrictions?

 What are the payment options and cancellation policy?

 Read the rental contract and asked for clarifications if unsure?

 Is onsite catering available? What is the cost?

 Is a kitchen available on site? Will the outside caterers be allowed to access the

kitchen to set up and warm the food?

 Discussed contracts, disclosures, and insurance requirements?

 Does the facility permit the caterers to come in the night before to set up the

tables?

 Who is responsible for the cleaning after the event?

 Does the facility have enough chairs and tables to seat all the guests? Will you

have to rent them if they don’t have enough?

 Can the facility provide a list of vendors?

 Is serving alcohol permitted in the facility? Does the facility provide the

bartenders?

SEATING OPTIONS

10 Copyright © 2012 International Institute of Event Management (SM). All Rights Reserved.

Another important decision is the seating arrangement. There are a number of different

seating styles suited to different kinds of events. The following list of seating

arrangements gives an overview of the different options available, which can be used in

combination if the event requires it.

CRESCENT/HALF-MOON SETUP

 Round tables arranged with 4-6 chairs, depending on table size.

 Facilitator and participants facing the speaker.

 Great for lunch meetings, educational sessions, and small group discussions.

CLASSROOM SETUP

 Rows of tables with chairs facing the front of the room, with enough writing space

for each participant.

 Can be used for training sessions with Q&A follow-up.

 Not appropriate for participants interacting with each other.

CHEVRON SETUP

 Chairs arranged in a slanted “V” shape with an aisle between two tables.

 Chairs facing the front with the speaker as the focal point.

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THEATER SETUP

 Chairs placed facing the podium.

 There are no tables in this style of seating.

 Popular style for presentations, conferences, and workshops.

BOARDROOM SETUP

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 Chairs placed on either side and at ends of a rectangular table.

 Appropriate for interactions among participants.

BANQUET ROUNDS STYLE

 Round banquet tables with 8-10 chairs.

 Works well for meals during conferences and for a variety of social events.

 Primary drawback is that some of the attendees do not have a clear view of the

stage.

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Use the following estimates to calculate the total area needed for comfortable seating.

Crescent style: 10 sq. ft. per person

Classroom seating: 9 sq. ft. per person

Theater seating: 7 sq. ft. per person

Boardroom seating: 10 sq. ft. per person

Banquet Rounds: 12 sq. ft. per person

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.

VENUE DESIGN

It’s the decor and ambiance that create the first impression and set the mood for any

event. Depending on the nature of the event, you can either hire a designer/decorator or

do it yourself. For a five-year-old’s birthday party you might buy the decorations at a

local store and show your creative side, while an extravagant wedding reception would

more likely demand the services of a professional.

CONDUCTING SITE INSPECTIONS

Never secure a location without a thorough walk-

through of the facility. Understanding the layout of

the venue helps ensure that adequate time is set

aside for setup and decor before the event. It can

also help in determining catering needs and

options. For instance, you may need to use the

kitchen without any restrictions. Also ensure that

other suppliers such as decorators and caterers

are present during the walk-through, as there is

no other substitute for understanding the floor

plan and restrictions. A good walk-through will

help caterers understand the layout of the facility

CONSIDER THIS..

Never secure a location

without a thorough walk-

through of the facility.

Understanding the layout of

the venue helps ensure that

adequate time is set

aside for setup and decor

before the event. It can also

help in determining catering

needs and options.

15 Copyright © 2012 International Institute of Event Management (SM). All Rights Reserved.

and the entry points to the building. Be sure to set aside two to three hours for a walk-

though, preferably two or three weeks before the event

KEEP IT REAL

The key to successful decor is keeping it in tune with the theme of the event and being

realistic about available time and resources. Be sure to keep the customer’s

expectations from running wild. Highly unusual theme selections may lead to

disappointment, as it may be very difficult to find the appropriate material and content.

The right approach is to be creative with what is available and to impress the client by

channeling creative juices into something realistic. Remember: before a customer can

dream it, you should be able to theme it!

DECOR AND VENUE

Decorations and design are the soul of any event and are intricately tied to the venue.

Once the venue is confirmed, it becomes the canvas for the event’s design. Some

popular decor items are balloons, props, flowers, fabric, and—last but not least—

lighting.

KEY SUPPLIERS

A successful event manager will lean on expertise from lighting experts, floral

designers, and artists. The effective use of color, light, and texture will create the perfect

ambiance for the occasion, suited to the type and purpose of the event. When

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organizing for corporate clients, brainstorm with them to work the company name or

product into the most unusual aspects of your event. Start by understanding the

impressions that a customer intends to create, which will form the basis for the theme,

style, and color. Every effort should be made to showcase those elements that convey

the purpose of the event. Consider displaying a logo at the entrance of the hallway or

room to catch the eye of the attendees as they enter. Hire a company that excels in

planning, design, and setup for all aspects of the event.

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CREATING THE RIGHT AMBIANCE

The use of audio as a design element can

enhance the mood of the event. When all the

senses align together, a very powerful design

element is created, facilitating the smooth flow of

activities during the course of the event. This in

turn produces a feeling of joy and upliftment that

guests will remember for years to come.

Space management is another important factor to

incorporate into your design framework. Use

space in an efficient manner. Do not clutter the

floors with too many props and do not place

tables too close together. On the other hand,

allowing too much empty space can distance

groups of people from one another. Clever use of

space will allow your guests to move around

freely without feeling lost.

Lighting is an important element of design and decor, especially in creating the mood of

the event. The proper use of lighting can transform an ordinary event into a spectacular

experience. Use light systems to promote sponsorships by creating customized light

designs that display logos in the room. Up-lighting a room with warm light, colored

CONSIDER THIS..

The use of audio as a

design element can

enhance the mood of the

event. When all the senses

align together, a very

powerful design element is

created, facilitating the

smooth flow of activities

during the course of the

event. This in turn produces

a feeling of joy and uplift

that guests will remember

for years to come.

18 Copyright © 2012 International Institute of Event Management (SM). All Rights Reserved.

lights, and golden hues can create a magical atmosphere. Brighter, onstage lighting

may be more appropriate for other events.

The decor for themed parties is relatively easy, being driven by theme of the event.

Examples of themed decor are casino night, winter wonderland, cafe setup, Hawaiian

luau party, decade party, and Mexican fiesta. Remember that decor is an excellent

opportunity to add your personal touch.

CONTRACTS

Planning a “special event”, be it a wedding, fundraiser, parade, community gathering,

concert in the park, or marathon….requires

detailed planning and preparation. Part of that

planning should include safety considerations

such as contracts and insurance.

A contract is an agreement between two or more

parties that create obligations for the parties

involved. A legal contract must be a formal

written document agreed upon and signed by

both parties. Some consider an oral agreement

to be a binding contract between the parties

involved, however, the recollection of the

obligations by the parties may differ and having no written and agreed upon document

has the potential to result in confusion at best and lost money and time at its worst. It is

CONSIDER THIS..

A contract is an agreement

between two or more

parties that create

obligations for the parties

involved. A legal contract

must be a formal written

document agreed upon and

signed by both parties.

19 Copyright © 2012 International Institute of Event Management (SM). All Rights Reserved.

advisable to have written agreements as these enable the parties to confirm numerous

details of the agreement. Well drafted and complete contracts will save you the hassle

of any litigation that may arise later due to a crises. Be careful before signing on the

dotted line. Make sure all the detailed agreements are listed in the contract and that all

the parties involved understand the terms of the contract.

Contracts contain terms and conditions to protect the interests of all the parties

involved. It is important to understand the various aspects of the contract.

While planning a big event it is wise to designate a responsible “Safety” Team Leader

who will be the go-to person and is fully aware of the event’s planning, schedule, and

safety plan and should oversee or be familiar with all the safety features of the event.

Site Selection- Select a location that is adequate for the number of participants and

spectators, accessible by all (keep in mind guests with disabilities), has adequate

accessible restroom facilities, exits are well marked, fire extinguishers and smoke

detectors are in good order, all surfaces are smooth, non-slip, and even, outdoor

sprinklers are turned off. Indoor and outdoor lighting should be adequate, with plenty of

accessible and secure parking spaces nearby. Ensure that your insurance will cover

you for any risk you assume in the venue’s lease or rental agreement. Read the lease

agreement carefully as you will want to make sure you are only agreeing to be liable for

those things over which you have control.

The type of use and number of participants for which your facility is safely suited should

be carefully considered, and described in your lease, permit or use agreement. It

should go without saying that you should in fact have a written agreement for a

20 Copyright © 2012 International Institute of Event Management (SM). All Rights Reserved.

member’s (or other third party’s) use of your facilities, and that agreement should cover

the scope of permitted use, indemnity obligations, insurance requirements and liability

waivers.

The site rentals most often write up an offer as a contract with the date of acceptance. If

you do not sign and return the offer by the mentioned date the site can be leased to

other parties.

Serving Alcohol – Check to see if you can have a licensed vendor serve alcohol. If not,

you’ll need a procedure for checking ID’s, and those serving alcohol should be trained to

serve/not serve patrons as appropriate. Cut off the booze service 2 hours prior to

ending your event as a precaution. If any of the members get DUI’s returning home from

21 Copyright © 2012 International Institute of Event Management (SM). All Rights Reserved.

events then the venue would be liable for supplying the alcohol and allowing the

attendees to drive home intoxicated.

In addition, liquor liability insurance coverage should be obtained and, if alcohol is to be

served by a third party host, an appropriate liquor liability insurance coverage should be

provided by the host via the property use agreement. The potential need for a

temporary liquor license should also be considered. For example, a wine tasting event

may require a one day liquor license.

Food and Beverage – Plan for proper refrigeration and heating, proper food service

(don’t want guests burning themselves on hot, spilled coffee!) If the event is catered,

ask the vendor to provide you with a copy of their insurance certificate and an

endorsement naming you as “additional insured”.

The food and beverage contract should specify the same important details such as the

date by which the confirmation should be made and the number of attendees be

confirmed, the date of confirmation of the menu and beverage services, agreement on

the costs of the food and beverage and details on gratuities, taxes and regulations.

Some food and beverage contracts are based on the minimum number of attendees or

a minimum dollar amount. In contracts with such an attrition clause be sure to specify

the consequences if the number of guests or the total amount falls below the agreed

number.

22 Copyright © 2012 International Institute of Event Management (SM). All Rights Reserved.

INVITATIONS

Guests can be invited in a number of ways. As a prelude, “save-the-date” invitations or

e-mails are useful in providing a preview to guests and in some cases (such as product

launches) can help create marketing buzz around the event. Spend time in researching

options such as print material, type of printing, e-mail marketing software, design, and

layout. Make sure that your choices fit within the customer’s budget. All invitations

should include basic content such as:

 Purpose of event

 Logistics information (venue, date, time, duration, and location)

 Information about attire

 Directions and parking information

 Contact information (phone, mailing address and/or e-mail)

 RSVP (method and date)

It is just as important to track responses to invitations. This is critical in managing other

elements such as venue capacity, catering needs, transportations and so on. It also

helps to create a follow-up plan for reminders, changes in event logistics or to get more

details from confirmed attendees.

Responses to invitations can be managed in a simple spreadsheet or, for large

corporate events, by leveraging the organization’s customer-relationship management

(CRM) tools to manage and track this information.

23 Copyright © 2012 International Institute of Event Management (SM). All Rights Reserved.

E-MAIL INVITATIONS

E-mail is the quickest and most effective method of sending and managing invitations,

as long as one has a complete and current list of e-mail addresses for the people to be

invited.

E-mail invitations should have a professional appearance, with eye-catching graphics,

an effective subject line, and relevant content.

Properly combining e-mail event invitations with an

online event registration and payment processing

system will dramatically streamline this process,

increase attendance numbers, reduce manual data

entry, and simplify attendee-tracking tasks. Post

event data analysis of over 75,000 events shows

that planners can achieve up to three times the

standard response rate after implementing

integrated e-mail marketing, direct mail, and

outbound calling campaigns.

Another key advantage of e-mail invitations is their

ability to incorporate advertising, links to the event

page, and other relevant content. Take care,

however, not to annoy attendees by sending them

CONSIDER THIS..

E-mail is the quickest and

most effective method of

sending and managing

invitations, as long as one

has a complete and current

list of e-mail addresses for

the people to be invited. E-

mail invitations should have

a professional appearance,

with eye-catching graphics,

an effective subject line,

and relevant content.

24 Copyright © 2012 International Institute of Event Management (SM). All Rights Reserved.

constant e-mail reminders. There are several e-mail marketing tools, such as Constant

Contact, that can be used very effectively to manage your e-mail invitations and the

response rate.

In addition to e-mail invitations, you should also follow up with phone calls, especially

close to the deadline.

PRINTED INVITATIONS

Printed invitations are customary for social events such as birthday parties and

weddings, and at times for formal corporate events. These can be best managed by

preparing ahead of time, since designing, printing, and distributing invitations via mail

takes much longer than sending e-mails. For most events, plan to start designing

invitations at least three months before the event, and mail them out no later than six to

eight weeks before the event. The most productive way to finalize the choice of design

and content is to schedule a session with the client. Make sure that a proof copy is

reviewed and approved by the customer before the invitation is sent for printing. Finally,

always print a few extra invitations; 5-10% more than needed should cover last-minute

additions or damaged copies.

FOOD & BEVERAGE

Food and beverages are an important if not the main focus of the event. After securing

the venue, the next priority is to finalize the catering. This can be fairly straightforward if

the customer has already identified a list of caterers to be engaged for the event. If the

25 Copyright © 2012 International Institute of Event Management (SM). All Rights Reserved.

customer is open to other choices, a good starting point is to get recommendations from

venue managers and to collect the names of those who have catered past events at

that location. A caterer familiar with the venue can make the process more efficient in

terms of logistics, planning, and paperwork.

Do not limit your choice of caterers to this list alone. With a little research you can

prepare a larger list of caterers and restaurants willing to work within the schedule and

budget constraints of the event. Background homework is essential before interviewing

caterers. Make sure that they are licensed and have the proper insurance coverage. At

the meeting with the caterer, examine the linen, silverware, flatware, chafing dishes,

etc., to avoid last-minute surprises. Confirm post event duties such as cleanup after the

event and policy on leftover food and drinks. Discuss the overall presentation and

26 Copyright © 2012 International Institute of Event Management (SM). All Rights Reserved.

details such as staff attire. It is always a good idea to make a list of questions before

meeting with the caterers and perhaps to send them the questions in advance to make

the meeting more efficient. Remember that catering can be the highlight of your event.

Never assume anything!

Complete the venue inspection with the caterers and ensure that they are conformable

with the layout and amenities, such as kitchen, stoves, prep area, and refrigerator

capacities. Receive all proposals and quotes with details, including menu items,

quantity, pricing, taxes, delivery charges, cleanup, disposal, and gratuities. Be certain

that the wait staff has detailed instructions on the event schedules, particularly the

timing of the meals and the cleanup deadline.

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The next step is to develop the menu. Strategize with the customers, discussing their

preferences and the options available. For themed events, the menu options may easily

be derived from the theme itself. Obtain a list of dietary restrictions from the customer

and always include some vegetarian dishes for guests who may prefer them.

Catering is generally managed on a per-person basis, and RSVPs can reduce the cost

of meals by providing accurate estimates of attendees. Include all support staff—

volunteers, media, AV staff, technicians, and others—in the overall count of attendees.

Lastly, add tips and other minor expenses to your overall budget.

RISK MANAGEMENT

Risk management is the identification, assessment, and creation of plans to mitigate

risks. The key to successful risk management is coordinated and economical

application of resources to minimize, monitor, and control the probability and/or impact

of unexpected circumstances. Risks can come from legal liabilities, delays, accidents or

natural causes amongst other things. Ensuring a safe and successful event involves

strategically managing all the risks associated with an event. The best protection

against large-scale events is to have good plans in place and to be ready to use them.

Event Risk Management consists of three primary steps, performed, more or less, in the

following order:

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 Risk Identification

 Risk Assessment

 Risk Mitigation

RISK IDENTIFICATION

During this phase you will need to identify risk areas and prioritize your event planning

resources. Create an inventory all of the possible risks related to the event and the

business environment that may impact the event negatively. Below is a list of potential

risks or special needs associated with a broad variety of events. The list is not all-

inclusive, but it is designed to help you think through the event, and with the assistance

of experts in these areas help assessing the possible exposure and mitigation plan:

mitigate

assess

identify

29 Copyright © 2012 International Institute of Event Management (SM). All Rights Reserved.

 Participant Safety

 Spectator Safety

 Emergency Response

 Crowd Control

 Excessive Noise

 Environmental Impact (air, water, hazardous waste, etc.)

 Security Concerns

 Potential Communication Problems

 Weather Contingencies

 Property Protection

 Alcohol Consumption

 Electrical/Infrastructure Requirements

 Unusual Accommodation Requirements

 Parking/Transportation to and from Event

 Permit Requirements

 Pyrotechnics

 Event cancellation

 Hazardous Materials

 Room Capacity issues

 Media Attention/Public Relations Issues

 Utility Needs such as Heating/Cooling etc

 Minors Involved as Participants

 Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) compliance

30 Copyright © 2012 International Institute of Event Management (SM). All Rights Reserved.

 Other Special Risks Posed by Vendors

RISK ASSESSMENT

The next step in risk management is the process to assess the risks associated with

the event. To assist you in this process and with addressing the risks once they are

identified, it is advisable to involve experts from a variety of areas. Examples of

business and domain experts that will be able to offer assistance are listed below.

 Business Affairs /Procurement for contracts, liability issues, insurance.

 Environmental Health & Safety for life safety and property protection issues,

room capacity, etc.

 Security Officers for crowd control, emergency response, parking, unlocking and

locking of buildings, background checks etc.

 Media and PR representatives for event communications, media coordination.

 Venue Facilities Management for facility requirements, room set ups, utilities,

property protection.

 Food Services for catering, refreshments etc.

 Outside Officials such as City Police Department, Fire Department, etc.

Not all risks are equally likely or important to an event. Give priority to the most critical

areas that can have a significant impact – for instance in an outdoor event, inclement

weather may be one of the most important risks that will need to be considered first.

Prioritize your planning efforts by first looking at the likelihood of these risks as well as

the expected duration of the possible failures. A conservative approach is to plan for the

31 Copyright © 2012 International Institute of Event Management (SM). All Rights Reserved.

worse case scenarios. Once you have prioritized risk areas, work with the domain

experts to draw up mitigation plans and develop contingency scenarios.

RISK MITIGATION

It is important that you define a controllable scope

before defining a mitigation plan. The output of your

assessment and prioritization will be useful in defining

the scope of your overall planning effort. You will now

need to use this information to draw a box around

your contingency efforts––what risks will you address

and which will your ignore?

These will be critical decisions and will require careful

consideration. Ask questions such as:

 Can measures be implemented to reduce the likelihood that an injury or other

loss will occur as a result of the event?

 Can measures be implemented that will reduce the severity of an injury or other

loss if one does occur?

 Is the risk too great? Should a particular activity be avoided altogether?

 Can any risk be addressed by a contract or an indemnification agreement?

 Can any remaining risk be addressed by insurance?

Indemnification is a key element in any risk mitigation plan. For example, if the event

involves any agreement with a third party sponsor, service provider, etc., the agreement

CONSIDER THIS..

Not all risks are equally

likely or important to an

event. Give priority to the

most critical areas that can

have a significant impact

32 Copyright © 2012 International Institute of Event Management (SM). All Rights Reserved.

must be reviewed to ensure that the appropriate indemnification language is included. If

the event involves participants that will be registering for the event (ex. conferences,

fund raisers), it may be appropriate to include a waiver on the registration form. Make

sure you have legal counsel review all such agreements.

Insurance is another important means of addressing risks associated with an event.

There are a variety of insurance options, so be sure to review your needs and select the

best options that meet the event’’ risk criteria. Some type of insurance options are listed

below:

 Special Event Insurance (provides coverage for a special event if risks cannot be

transferred to third parties).

 Crime insurance (provides coverage in the case of theft of goods or securities

during the event)

 Vehicle liability insurance (provides coverage for owned vehicles, rental vehicles

or other vehicles driven by employees during the event)

 Property insurance (provides coverage for damage to property)

 Equipment insurance (provides coverage for special equipment used during an

event)

 Fine Art insurance (provides coverage art loaned for a special event)

 Workers’ Compensation (self-insurance – if an employee is injured while working

at the event)

It is also advisable to specify insurance requirements for third parties involved with an

event, such as sponsors or service providers. Third parties can provide evidence that

33 Copyright © 2012 International Institute of Event Management (SM). All Rights Reserved.

such insurance is in place by providing a certificate of insurance. The type of insurance

required and the level of insurance required can vary by event.

The final aspect of risk mitigation is the development of contingency procedures – these

are the actions that need to be taken in the case of a risk coming true during the event.

All parties involved will need to be trained on procedures or practices envisioned under

the mitigation plan as well as on what their assigned roles will be. The best training

practices include walk-throughs, tabletop exercises, and functional simulations. For the

most critical planning areas, full dress rehearsals involving a combination of tabletop

and functional exercises will be required to fully test your plans and your ability to

execute and monitor them. This testing process will also uncover any flawed

assumptions in the plan.

34 Copyright © 2012 International Institute of Event Management (SM). All Rights Reserved.

The documentation in the plan should be detailed enough to provide the step-by-step

guidance needed. You cannot expect staff to pick up a plan during a crisis and read

about what they should do. Your efforts at developing good plans will be rewarded in

the event of a disastrous circumstance.

The mitigation plan should be implemented when a trigger event occurs. Notification of

key personnel and emergency response teams should be followed by communication to

all staff and the public. You should let anyone affected by the plan know that the plan

has been activated and the expected duration of the contingency mode. Your plan will

also need to include business resumption and recovery planning. It is important to have

a plan for “standing down” and for the resumption of normal operation after the risk has

ended.

No one can predict the what risks will actually occur but you can be certain that taking

the necessary planning and preparedness steps ahead of time, will limit damages and

speed the recovery process.

35 Copyright © 2012 International Institute of Event Management (SM). All Rights Reserved.

END OF MODULE

36 Copyright © 2012 International Institute of Event Management (SM). All Rights Reserved.

MODULE TWO: ASSIGNMENTS

INSTRUCTIONS

 The objective of these Assignments is to demonstrate a good understanding of

concepts presented in this Module.

 Complete these assignments by preparing your responses to the tasks

described below.

 A maximum of 100 points can be earned by completing all Assignments

 The minimum passing score is 70 points. If you are graded with less than 70

points, the Assignments must be revised and re-submitted.

 Email your Assignments to faculty@ii-em.org

 Include your Full Name, contact email address and attach the completed

assignment documents (MS word format ).

ASSIGNMENT 1 – 30 POINTS

Conduct research on an event of your choice, either online or by attending a local event.

Prepare a report of approximately of 700-1000 words related to this event. Make sure to

describe the three aspects of event management presented in this Module.

 Event Objective (10 points)mailto:faculty@ii-em.org

37 Copyright © 2012 International Institute of Event Management (SM). All Rights Reserved.

 Food and Beverage (10 points)

 Strategic Planning (10 points)

ASSIGNMENT 2 – 50 POINTS

A Fortune 500 Corporation has selected your company to create their 100th anniversary

celebration. This history-making event will be held on one day, and encompass three-

different activities and venues – an employee business meeting, celebration activities

and a gala dinner. Prepare a report of approximately of 1000 words describing how you

will plan this event. Use the following topics as guidelines:

 Understanding objectives (10 points)

 Selecting venues (10 points)

 Catering for the gala dinner (10 points)

 Ground transportation to and from events (10 points)

 Assessment of any risks associated with the event (10 points)

ASSIGNMENT 3 – 20 POINTS

Attend a local event (social or corporate). Write a brief report on the event describing

details such as event type, venue, décor, invitations and food. State your impressions of

the event, in terms of the following:

 Things that were well planned and things that were not well organized (10 points)

38 Copyright © 2012 International Institute of Event Management (SM). All Rights Reserved.

 Explain in detail the elements that were not planned well and describe how you

would improve on them to make the event better (10 points)

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