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As evident in the literature, and as discussed in this course, there are many significant challenges faced by organisations to achieve effective human performance management. Choose two or three of such challenges that you feel are important and relevant to today’s organisations. Discuss these challenges and what managers and human resource (HR) practitioners need to do in order to deal with them. Include relevant underlying theories to support your arguments.

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Submission Process: Task 2 Individual Essay must be submitted online through the BUSM1228 course information link in Canvas. When you submit the written report it will be automatically processed through Turnitin as part of the on-line submission process. All marking staff will comment on what you have done well in this essay and what you need to improve based on the following assessment criteria: • Key issues relating to the essay question/prompt have been developed • Original and clear argument; • Logical and convincing discussion • Ideas and assertions substantiated through use of high quality reference material and key academic perspectives/views used to develop arguments • Number and quality of references, appropriate RMIT business referencing format • Clear and comprehensive written style (essay structure, spelling, grammar, syntax etc.)

Assessment Task Two Individual Essay – 45 marks 


BUSM1228 Assessment 2 unpacked 


Word Limit: 2000 words (10% less or more allowed) 


References: Minimum 10 academic references Due date: By 11:59pm 


All marking staff will comment on what you have done well in this essay and what you need to improve based on the following assessment criteria: 


• Key issues relating to the essay question/prompt have been developed

• Original and clear argument; • Logical and convincing discussion • Ideas and assertions substantiated through use of high quality

reference material and key academic perspectives/views used to develop arguments

• Number and quality of references, appropriate RMIT business referencing format

• Clear and comprehensive written style (essay structure, spelling, grammar, syntax etc.)

Assessment 2 guide tips: 


• Please remember to use the rmit learning lab • Ensure that you write in an objective tone in your work (academic

writing within your work) • Please make sure you have 1.5 line spacing and please use times new

roman if you can

• Please remember to have maximum 2 or 3 direct quotes in your work and try and paraphrase as much as you can.

• Please make sure you have about 15-18 references to surpass the minimum of 10

Links you can use for your assessment: RMIT learning lab: https://emedia.rmit.edu.au/learninglab/welcome RMIT easy cite: https://www.rmit.edu.au/library 


Journals to look at: Asia Pacific Journal of Human Resources International Journal of Human Resources Management Journal of Management International Journal of Business Performance Management Personnel Review International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management 


Introduction:  


• 150 words here within your work.  Please feel free to summarise what you intend to talk about in your essay here.  This section of your work is about summarising key concepts and nothing more.https://emedia.rmit.edu.au/learninglab/welcomehttps://www.rmit.edu.au/library

 Paragraph one:  • Name one challenge that you think human performance management

does face.   • Justify why you think this is a challenge  • What HR managers need to do to overcome this challenge.   • In your paragraph refer to about 1 or 2 theories from this course

Paragraph two: 


• Name one challenge that you think human performance management does face.

• Justify why you think this is a challenge • What HR managers need to do to overcome this challenge. • In your paragraph refer back to about 1 or 2 theories from this course

Paragraph three (optional) 


• Name one challenge that you think human performance management does face.

• Justify why you think this is a challenge • What HR managers need to do to overcome this challenge. • In your paragraph refer back to about 1 or 2 theories from this course

Paragraph four: (optional) 


• Find a company that has got a good performance management system (ie accenture) and outline how they do things so well and how they have overcome challenges mentioned above.

Conclusion: 


150 words here in your conclusion summarising the main components of your work. Here please summarise the main elements of your work. You can start off by outlining “this essay will attempt to conclude” and then summarise what you have examined in the assignment. 


Reference list: Please make sure you have your reference list here and ensure it adheres to RMIT Harvard style referencing. Please make sure you have your references in alphabetical order and please ensure that all the references appearing in your essay, also appear in your reference list and vice versa.

Managing Performance in Organisations

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— Lecture 2: Planning for performance

Managing Performance in Organisations

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To create Em dash above headline:

Same size and weight as the headline and set using a soft return.

PC: Em dash (—): Alt+Ctrl+ – (minus)

Mac: Em dash (—): Shift+Alt/Option+hyphen

1

Recap – Lecture 1

The course structure & assessment

Why am I doing this course?

Managing performance: What’s the deal and why should I be aware of it?

What is performance management and how is it different to a performance appraisal?

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Assessment overview

Group Presentation (20 mins) 15%

Due date: In the tutorials from Weeks 4-11

Individual Essay (2000 words) 45%

Due Date: Sunday, Week 7 at 11:59pm

Exam (2 hours) 40%

During the exam period

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3

Group Presentation (20 mins, during weeks 4-11)

In the tutorials, you’ll get to pick a week to present (ideally one group per week)

20 minutes for the presentation, plus 5 minutes of Q&A

Each group consists of 3-4 students

Do not summarise the lecture slides, but use them as a foundation from which to build your presentation

Be creative and interactive!

Each group will be evaluated by the tutor and their peers/classmates

This provides a little taste of evaluating performance

Please give the tutor a hardcopy version of your presentation

Use a real life case study or practical examples to reflect and apply the knowledge you get from the course

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4

Individual Essay (2000 words – 45%)

TOPIC:

As evident in the literature and discussed throughout the course, there are many challenges faced by organisations to achieve effective human performance management.

Choose two or three challenges that you feel are the most important today, and discuss what HR managers need to do in order to deal with them. Be sure to include relevant theories to help support your arguments.

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5

Research essay (2000 words – 45%)

Minimum of 10 academic references – if you don’t have 10, you can’t pass the assignment

Do NOT use Wikipedia, blogs, or university websites for your references

High quality academic journals to be used

Textbooks are okay

Due Date is Sunday, Week 7, 11:59pm

Submission only through Canvas

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6

Assessment criteria

Key issues relating to the question have been developed

Original and clear argument

Logical and convincing discussion

Ideas and assertions substantiated through use of high quality reference material and key academic perspectives/views used to develop arguments

Appropriate Harvard style referencing (in text and list of references)

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7

Final Exam (2 hours)

The final exam will require you to put yourself in a HR Manager’s shoes and reflect on and discuss how you deal with performance management issues

Questions will be drawn from selected topics and lectures in the course

Sample Questions will be provided in Weeks 11 and 12

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What is diversity in the workplace and why is it important? What can organisations do to cultivate diversity to improve employee performance? (10 marks)

Example Exam Question

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9

Why am I doing this course?

You had an elective, and thought why not give this course a crack?

You heard about the awesome teaching team from someone who did the course last semester/year

You want to pick up some theoretical knowledge, frameworks for performance, and processes from the lectures, but are far more interested in its real world applications and the horror stories/success stories from the teaching team’s corporate experience in the tutorials

You are hiding from someone, and thought this lecture theatre would be vacant at 10:30am on Tuesdays

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10

Managing Performance: What’s the deal, and why should I be aware of it?

Everyone is judged on their performance, whether it’s in a formal or informal process

You need to be acutely aware of performance management processes if you’re going to succeed in the corporate world

Once you’re out there in the corporate world, you’ll find two distinct kinds of managers: good ones and bad ones

The good ones know what they’re doing, so we won’t worry about them. It’s the bad ones we worry about

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11

Managing Performance: What’s the deal, and why should I be aware of it?

Bad managers who manage performance tend to fail horribly (or hilariously, depending on your point of view) because they do not have the right skills to manage the performance of people

They also don’t understand what performance management is, or how it helps employees and organisations achieve goals

As students and future practitioners, you need to develop both the technical skills and the soft skills in order to manage human performance

This course covers both, technical and soft skills so you’ll be better placed to succeed

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12

What is performance management and how is it different to an appraisal?

PM is the process of setting and monitoring measures and objectives for employees, managers, and executives

It is a closed loop process meaning that objectives are constantly reviewed and performance diaries are maintained by the employee and their manager, which details ongoing successes and challenges

PM is slightly different to appraisals, which is the process that identifies, evaluates and develops employee performance to meet employee and organisational goals

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13

Learning overview

Explain the KPI framework and outline how they are used

Understand how KPIs are used to monitor performance

Describe an operational plan, and the steps involved in writing one

Explain the relationship between operational plans and performance management

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KPI Framework

Organisations are judged by the results they achieve.

This is true for public and private organisations.

Critical success factors (CSFs), performance indicators (PI) and key performance indicators (KPIs) are essential roles for organisational success and to assist failing organisations achieve a turnaround.

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KPI Framework (2)

Critical Success Factors (CSFs) identify those aspects of the organisation that are critical for its success.

Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) are those indicators of performance that are seen as being of great importance to the success of the business of the organisation.

Performance Indicators (PIs) are measures of different parts of the organisation’s performance and relate to results the organisation wants to achieve.

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KPI Framework (3)

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Critical Success Factors (CSF)

Critical success factors (CSFs):

identify aspects of organisation that are critical for success.

are few in number.

assist the organisation to achieve its plan for the cycle.

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Critical Success Factors (2)

Senior management develop CSFs in consultation with customers, employees, suppliers and other stakeholders.

KPIs assist in addressing the CSFs by identifying clear measures of operational performance.

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Composition of KPIs

KPIs:

relate to ends rather than means

are related to results, outputs, consequences, payoffs and performance

drive values and behaviours through an organisation

Actions are found in operational plans, not KPIs

Example: A company might want to increase market share, so the KPIs are likely to measure sales growth

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Why bother with KPIs?

Process improvement

Benchmarking

Strategic and business planning

Enterprise bargaining

All new systems and technology advances require KPIs to be (re)negotiated

Increase productivity

Support the introduction and implementation of self-managed teams

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Key Takeaways: KPIs

Fundamental to performance management systems

Provide focus for measurement

Form the basis of individual performance objectives

Underpin the efficient operation of the organisation

Used in conjunction with critical success factors

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Operational Plans: What are they?

Operational plans achieve strategies.

More than one operational plan can run concurrently.

Operational/business plan are interchangeable terms.

Operational planning is routinised, operationally specific, small-scale change and is resource driven.

Operational plans are drawn up by middle and supervisory management.

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Operational Plans: Are they useful?

Yes, yes they are.

Show how the organisation will achieve its goals

Are action plans

Detail how a strategic plan will be achieved

Written at different levels

Convert strategy into specific, detailed plans for implementation

Inform management of progress towards strategic objectives

Provide monitoring benchmarks.

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Operational Plans: What are they made of?

Not made of stainless steel, but do include:

marketing

communication (internal and external)

human resources

purchasing

finance

sales

how services will be delivered

how policy will be implemented

production

potential problems

technology upgrades

systems

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Operational Plans: Why you should take note

Forces specific thinking on issues, opportunities, challenges and operational matters.

Increases flexibility and preparation for change.

Enables efficient use of resources.

Increases quality.

Speeds up decision making.

Identifies cost savings.

Provides specific direction for staff.

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Operational Plans: How to write one

Executive summary.

Key assumptions.

Recommendations or strategies.

Strategic objectives relating to the work group.

Overview of what to be achieved in next planning cycle.

Operational objectives with performance standards.

Review of current operations

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Operational Plans: Private Sector

Private SectorPublic Sector
Marketing and salesCommunication strategies
PurchasingHuman resources
ProductionOrganisational structure
Human resourcesFinancial information
Organisational structurePurchasing
SystemsHow services will be delivered
Technology upgradesHow policy will be implemented
Financial informationTechnology upgrades
Reporting structuresSystems
Reporting structures

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Operational Plans: How do I contribute?

For staff to contribute to an operational plan, they must be set performance objectives.

Strategic plans implemented through operational plans.

Operational plans implemented through individual performance objectives or standards.

Integral in managing performance.

Managers must monitor progress towards goals.

Individual standards ensure employees working towards the operational and strategic goals.

Managing individual performance of staff influences achievement of operational objectives.

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Review Questions

What are CSFs and KPIs?

Describe the KPI framework

How does an operational plan aid performance management?

What does it really sound like when doves cry?

How much wood would a woodchuck chuck if a woodchuck could chuck wood?

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— Lecture 3: Performance standards and motivation

Managing Performance in Organisations

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To create Em dash above headline:

Same size and weight as the headline and set using a soft return.

PC: Em dash (—): Alt+Ctrl+ – (minus)

Mac: Em dash (—): Shift+Alt/Option+hyphen

1

Recap – Lecture 2

The KPI framework

How KPIs are used to monitor performance

Operational plans: What’s the dealio with them?

Explain the relationship between operational plans and performance management

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Learning overview

Define and explain ‘motivation’

Understand the differences between Intrinsic and Extrinsic motivation

Describe the different content (needs) and cognitive (process) theories in motivation

Explain the term ‘performance standard’.

Describe the relationship between performance standards and strategy

Write clear and concise performance standards.

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Motivation – A definition

Motivation is the process by which a person’s efforts are energised, directed and sustained towards attaining a goal.

Three key elements in this definition: energy, direction, persistence.

Energy: Intensity and drive.

Direction: Effort that is directed towards and is consistent with organisation goals.

Persistence: Employees putting in effort at all times to achieve goals

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The Nature of Motivation

Two types: Intrinsic and Extrinsic

Intrinsic:

Behaviour performed for its own sake

Motivation stems from performing behaviour itself

Extrinsic:

Behaviour performed to avoid punishment or acquire material or social rewards

Motivation is the consequences of the behaviour itself

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Early motivation theories

Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs

McClelland’s Three-needs Theory

McGregor’s Theory X and Theory Y

Hertzberg’s Two-factor Theory

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Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs

Work your way up the pyramid

Managers do things to satisfy employees’ needs

Once a need is satisfied, an individual isn’t motivated to satisfy (or continue) satisfying that particular need

Focus on satisfying needs at or above the level a person is on

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McClelland’s Three-needs Theory

Three acquired – not innate – needs for achievement

Needs for power: Making others behave in a way they wouldn’t otherwise

Needs for affiliation: Desire for interpersonal relationships

Needs for achievement: The drive to succeed and excel in relation to a set of standards

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McGregor’s Theory X and Theory Y

Theory X: Negative view of people

People have little ambition

Dislike work

Avoid responsibility

Need for close control for work to be done

Theory Y: Positive view of people

People enjoy work

Seek out and accept responsibility

Exercise self-direction

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Hertzberg’s Two-factor Theory

People’s working conditions influence motivation

Extrinsic factors influencing motivation called “hygiene factors”

Intrinsic factors influencing motivation called “motivators”

While managers can control hygiene factors, it is argued that managers need to tap into motivators

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Contemporary motivation theories

Vroom’s Expectancy Theory

Equity Theory

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Vroom’s Expectancy Theory

Motivation depends on individuals’ expectations about their ability to perform tasks and receive desired rewards

Check out this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wm5ypcltyvI

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Adam’s Equity Theory

People compare themselves to others

Employees compare what they get from a job (outcomes) in relation to what they put into it (inputs), and then compare that ratio to others

Typical responses to “unfair” outcomes: quitting jobs, putting in less effort, distort our own effort or other’s effort (e.g. he had to work 90 hrs instead to get X, whereas I didn’t)

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Performance Standards: What are they?

Simply put, it’s a measure of performance in the form of a statement of how well the performance is done

Focused on quality, quantity, and/or timeliness.

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Examples

Fries are only kept for 7 minutes before disposal!

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Examples of Managerial Performance Standards

People Performance

Financial Performance

Employee turnover reduced by 30%

Employee engagement survey results improve by 10%

Absenteeism rates reduced by 10%

Number of new clients increase by 20%

Sales increased by 20%

Profit margin more than 30%

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The link between strategy and performance standards

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Performance standards provide clarity and reduce misunderstandings

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What do you see here?

Poor communication leads to mistakes being made

Assuming something is one way when it isn’t also leads to performance problems

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Setting Performance Standards

PS = R+M:

Performance Standard [PS] equals

Result [R] plus a Measure [M] of the result

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Tests for Performance Standards

The truth test – Is the measure definitely measuring what it’s meant to measure?

The focus test – Is the measure only measuring what it’s meant to measure?

The consistency test – Is the measure consistent whenever or whoever measures?

The access test – Can the data be readily communicated and easily understood?

The clarity test – Is any ambiguity possible in interpretation of the results?

The so what test – Can, and will, the data be acted upon?

The timeliness test – Can the data be analysed soon enough so that action can be taken?

The cost test –  Is it worth the cost of collecting and analysing the data?

The gaming test – Does the measure encourage any undesirable behaviours?

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Review Questions

What are some of the early theories of motivation?

What are more contemporary theories of motivation?

How does motivation interact with performance standards?

If you can see something, can management measure it?

If a woodchuck could chuck and would chuck wood, how much wood would a woodchuck chuck if a woodchuck could chuck wood?

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— Lecture 4: Monitoring and analysing performance

Managing Performance in Organisations

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To create Em dash above headline:

Same size and weight as the headline and set using a soft return.

PC: Em dash (—): Alt+Ctrl+ – (minus)

Mac: Em dash (—): Shift+Alt/Option+hyphen

1

Recap – Lecture 3

The KPI framework

How KPIs are used to monitor performance

Operational plans: What’s the dealio with them?

Explain the relationship between operational plans and performance management

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Learning overview

Identify what to monitor in the workplace.

Explain the benefits of monitoring for staff and managers.

Identify potential problems in analysing performance

Use a framework to analyse performance

Explain issues with each step of the analysis framework

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Monitoring Performance

Performance management includes monitoring.

KPIs guide what should be monitored.

Monitoring is an information gathering process.

Monitoring allows decisions to be made and action taken.

Gathering useful information is key to the performance management system.

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Why monitor?

Allows quick response to new situations or changes in performance.

Monitoring enables you to:

keep people on track

form a foundation on which to base feedback

negotiate changes

collect information

maintain the performance management system

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Monitoring

Monitoring enables analysis of performance

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What to monitor

Two main types of monitoring

End of performance

During performance

What to monitor will depend on

Your KPIs

Specific performance standards

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Evidence and feedback

Evidence needs to be:

collected over whole period

relate to agreed standards or objectives

collected on excellent, satisfactory, and unsatisfactory performance

explicit and accurate

 Quality of evidence effects quality of feedback

 Effective monitoring ensures evidence is representative

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Evidence: When should I collect it?

Evidence collected according to monitoring system.

Evidence collected at milestones for action of standards.

Evidence covers good and poor performance.

Manager and staff collect evidence whenever it is useful.

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I always feel like somebody’s watching me…

Staff encouraged to self monitor.

Self monitoring increases:

commitment to process

increased job satisfaction

skills development

awareness of problems

early intervention

ability to ask for assistance.

Two way communication is important.

Managers should regularly discuss monitoring with staff.

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Whatchu talkin’ bout Willis?

At monitoring don’t make judgments about evidence. Being non-judgmental:

Ensures proper analysis of evidence

Reduces biases, personal beliefs and prejudices

Reduces risk of litigation

Reduces risk of damaging relationships.

Intervention without analysis may decrease staff:

Productivity

Motivation

Organisational commitment.

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Analyse This!

Analysing performance needs to be done daily and longer term.

The framework ensures managers:

Consider possible causes of unsatisfactory performance

Reward exceptional performance.

Managers need to review actual performance of individuals.

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Analyse That!

The process of comparing actual performance with agreed performance standards and looking at why gaps have occurred between the two.

Analysis uses evidence collected over the performance management cycle.

Managers need to answer the following question:

Why is performance at the level it is?

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Problems with analysis

Human error

Halo effect

Horn effect

Categorical statements

Simplification

Stereotypes

Inflexibility

Leniency

Central tendency

Discrimination

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A Framework

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Review

Performance standards

To know what is expected

Use standards whilst analysing performance

Identify conditions such as time, equipment, information

Managers review what they promised they would do

Evidence collected

Review evidence

Is evidence valid

Use examples

Is evidence sufficient

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Nothing compares to you

Agreed performance vs. actual performance

Compare evidence

Sort evidence

If there is not sufficient evidence collect more

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Determine

The performance problem

The nature of the problems

What exactly is the performance problem

The importance of the problem

The impact of the problem

Important enough to solve?

Possibly set a new performance standard

Context of performance need to be considered to ensure a fair outcome.

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Skills

Are the right skills possessed?

Have the skills been used before?

Are the skills used regularly?

Refresher training may be required

Job aids

Individual practice

Demonstrations, coaching and observation

Redesign of job to incorporate skills

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Performance

Does performance result in ‘punishment’ ?

Does poor performance get rewarded?

Is performance meaningful?

Are there barriers to performance?

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The (almost) final word

Poor analysis is associated with the use of bias.

The analysis framework helps to:

promotes objectivity

helps develop interpersonal skills

forces people to look widely for causes of performance

minimises human error.

Need to identify causes so action can be taken.

Managers must be prepared to invest time and effort.

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Review Questions

What are the potential problems in performance management that monitoring helps to overcome?

What are the benefits of monitoring for managers?

How might contextual issues in the workplace shape performance?

Isn’t it creepy that Facebook has targeted ads towards us?

Have you ever noticed the “easy to open” packages are anything BUT easy to open?

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— Lecture 5: Legal frameworks governing performance management

Managing Performance in Organisations

‹#›

To create Em dash above headline:

Same size and weight as the headline and set using a soft return.

PC: Em dash (—): Alt+Ctrl+ – (minus)

Mac: Em dash (—): Shift+Alt/Option+hyphen

1

Recap – Lecture 4

Identify what to monitor in the workplace.

Explain the benefits of monitoring for staff and managers.

Identify potential problems in analysing performance

Use a framework to analyse performance

Explain issues with each step of the analysis framework

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Learning overview

Identify the legal framework(s) that govern performance management

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Legal Frameworks

Australia has many different legal frameworks that govern performance management

Examples include:

Awards and regulations

Industrial relations regulations (e.g. Fair Work Act 2009 Cth)

State and Federal laws

Equal Employment Opportunity legislation

Anti-discrimination Act

Workplace Health & Safety

Workplace agreements

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Legal Frameworks (2)

Examples also include:

Workers’ Compensation

Specific employment contracts

Determination of tribunals, commissions and industrial courts

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Workplace Agreements

If you’re working in a large organisation, chances are they have a union-negotiated workplace agreement

These agreements will outline specifically how performance in the organisation is handled

HR team is responsible for overall management of performance of the organisation

Line managers/supervisors are responsible for managing performance of individuals/teams

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A Typical Policy (based on a workplace agreement)

Provides a general statement

Includes definitions – who is relevant, and what their role is

Principles – these include things like cognitive bias, diversity, gender equality, and non-discriminatory approaches

Responsibilities and/or authorities

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Example 1: Preamble

(Company name) is committed to ensuring optimum performance of all staff and has policies and guidelines in place that support and reward high performing staff.

Where there is unsatisfactory performance, this shall be managed in accordance with (Company name’s) Performance Guidelines and the procedures in the applicable industrial agreement, as amended or replaced.

Disputes arising from the application of this policy may be appealed through the Appeals Policy or through the dispute mechanisms contained in the applicable industrial agreement, as amended or replaced.

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Example 1: The steps

Stage 1

The employee must be provided with sufficient notice of the performance meeting to allow the manager and employee sufficient time to prepare for the discussion.

The manager is to ensure the employee understands what is covered in the meeting.

The manager and employee are to agree on the nature of the preparation of the meeting, including the documents that will be referred to during the course of the meeting.

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Example 1 (cont.)

Stage 2

The employee and their manager must discuss the following:

Goals

Actions

Developmental needs

Outcomes and measures of success

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Example 1 (cont.)

Stage 3

The employee and their manager must provide feedback to one another including:

Professional development

In a timely manner

Evidence based

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Example 1 (cont.)

Stage 4

The manager must evaluate the employee against the following criteria:

Performance against agreed upon targets

Agree to a new set of targets for the coming year

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Example 1 (cont.)

Grievance/Dispute Procedures

This is typically where the legal frameworks come into play

Where I have highlighted text in red is where it matches with the Fair Work Act (2009) and/or relevant State/Territory legislation, or the workplace agreement.

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Example 1 (cont)

Grievance/Dispute Procedures

If at any stage either the employee or manager do not agree on the content or outcome of the performance management process, the parties can seek an independent review.

The review will involve the HR Manager and the relevant senior manager of the employee’s area.

The panel will seek written submissions and conduct interviews with both parties documenting the reason for the dispute and seek supporting further evidence for review

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Anti-discrimination Acts

In Australia it is unlawful to discriminate on the basis of age, disability, race, sex, interest status, gender identity, and sexual orientation

The federal anti-discrimination laws are contained in the following legislation:

Age Discrimination Act 2004

Disability Discrimination Act 1992

Racial Discrimination Act 1975

Sex Discrimination Act 1984

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Anti-discrimination Acts & PM

Age discrimination – direct and indirect forms

Direct form – a person treats another less favourably than – in situations that are the same or not materially different – worse due to their age

Indirect form – a person proposes to impose or imposes a condition that disadvantages people of different ages

Disability discrimination – direct and indirect forms

Direct form – a person discriminates against another person on the ground of a disability, if because of a disability, that person is treated less favourably than an able-bodied person

Indirect form – a person requires a person with a disability to comply with a condition that the disabled person cannot reasonably do

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horn effect

16

Racial Discrimination & PM

It is unlawful for a person to do any act involving a distinction, exclusion, restriction, or preference based on race, colour, descent, or national or ethnic origin which has the purpose or effect of nullifying or impairing the recognition, enjoyment or exercise, on an equal footing, of any human right or fundamental freedom in the political, economic, social, cultural, or any other field of public life.

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Horn effect

17

Sex Discrimination Act & PM

A person discriminates against another person on the ground of a disability, if because of a their biological sex, that person is treated less favourably than an a member of a different sex.

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Horn effect

18

Review Questions

What legislation is in place to provide frameworks for performance management?

Why is this legislation important?

How might managers be influenced by the legislative framework?

Was Larry Bird the baddest dude on the planet in the NBA in the 80s?

Will Philadelphia trade Ben Simmons?

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