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Required Readings

American Psychiatric Association. (2013h). Feeding and eating disorders. In Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (5th ed.). Arlington, VA: Author. doi:10.1176/appi.books.9780890425596.dsm10

Khalsa, S. S., Portnoff, L. C., McCurdy-McKinnon, D., & Feusner, J. D. (2017). What happens after treatment? A systematic review of relapse, remission, and recovery in anorexia nervosa. Journal of Eating Disorders, 5(20), 1–12. doi:10.1186/s40337-017-0145-3

Lewis, B., & Nicholls, D. (2016). Behavioural eating disorders. Paediatrics and Child Health, 26(12), 519–526. doi:10.1016/j.paed.2016.08.005

American Psychiatric Association. (2013). Somatic symptom and related disorders. In Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (5th ed.). Arlington, VA: Author. doi:10.1176/appi.books.9780890425596.dsm09

Brown, P., Lyson, M., & Jenkins, T. (2011). From diagnosis to social diagnosis. Social Science & Medicine, 73(6), 939–943. doi:10.1016/j.socscimed.2011.05.031

Kaltura Media Uploader (HTML)

Required Media

Accessible player –Downloads–Download Video w/CCDownload AudioDownload TranscriptLaureate Education (Producer). (2018d). Psychopathology and diagnosis for social work practice podcast: Feeding and eating disorder and somatic symptom disorders [Audio podcast]. Baltimore, MD: Author.

TEDx Talks. (2016b, June 29). Starving for the good: An anorexic’s search for meaning and perfection | Elisabeth Huh | TedxUChicago [Video file]. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GxI0ewBJdMo

TEDx Talks. (2013b, October 21). An epidemic of beauty sickness | Renee Engeln | TedxUConn 2013 [Video file]. Retrieved from https://youtu.be/63XsokRPV_Y

TED Conferences, LLC (Producer). (2016). What happens when you have a disease doctors can’t diagnose [Video file]. Retrieved from https://www.ted.com/talks/jen_brea_what_happens_when_you_have_a_disease_doctors_can_t_diagnose

Optional Resources

Axelsson, E., Andersson, E., Ljótsson, B., Finn, D. W., & Hedman, E. (2016). The health preoccupation diagnostic interview: Inter-rater reliability of a structured interview for diagnostic assessment of DSM-5 somatic symptom disorder and illness anxiety disorder. Cognitive Behaviour Therapy, 45 (4), 259–269. doi:10.1080/16506073.2016.1161663

Marzilli, E., Cerniglia, L., & Cimino, S. (2018). A narrative review of binge eating disorder in adolescence: Prevalence, impact, and psychological treatment strategies. Adolescent Health, Medicine and Therapeutics, 2018(9), 17–30. doi:10.2147/AHMT.S148050

Vartanian, L. R., Trewartha, T., & Vanman, E. J. (2016). Disgust predicts prejudice and discrimination toward individuals with obesity. Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 46(6), 369–375. doi:10.1111/jasp.12370

Document: Suggested Further Reading for SOCW 6090 (PDF)

Note: This is the same document introduced in Week 1.

Optional Media

Sagey, L., & Blair, R. (Producers). (n.d.). Anorexia: What therapists and parents need to know [Video file]. Retrieved March 22, 2018, from http://www.psychotherapy.net.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/stream/waldenu/video?vid=386

Discussion: The Complexity of Eating Disorder Recovery in the Digital Age

Through this week’s Learning Resources, you become aware not only of the prevalence of factors involved in the treatment of eating disorders, but also the societal, medical, and cultural influences that help individuals develop and sustain the unhealthy behaviors related to an eating disorder. These behaviors have drastic impacts on health. In clinical practice, social workers need to know about the resources available to clients living with an eating disorder and be comfortable developing interdisciplinary, individualized treatment plans for recovery that incorporate medical and other specialists.

For this Discussion, you focus on guiding clients through treatment and recovery.

To prepare:

  • Review the Learning Resources on experiences of living with an eating disorder, as well as social and cultural influences on the disorder.
  • Read the case provided by your instructor for this week’s Discussion.
By Day 3

Post a 300- to 500-word response in which you address the following:

  • Provide the full DSM-5 diagnosis for the client. Remember, a full diagnosis should include the name of the disorder, ICD-10-CM code, specifiers, severity, and the Z codes (other conditions that may be a focus of clinical attention). Keep in mind a diagnosis covers the most recent 12 months.
  • Explain the diagnosis by matching the symptoms identified in the case to the specific criteria for the diagnosis.
  • Explain why it is important to use an interprofessional approach in treatment. Identity specific professionals you would recommend for the team, and describe how you might best utilize or focus their services.
  • Explain how you would use the client’s family to support recovery. Include specific behavioral examples.
  • Select and explain an evidence-based, focused treatment approach that you might use in your part of the overall treatment plan.
  • Explain how culture and diversity influence these disorders. Consider how gender, age, socioeconomic status, sexual orientation, and/or ethnicity/race affect the experience of living with an eating disorder.    

Note: You do not need to include an APA reference to the DSM-5 in your response. However, your response should clearly be informed by the DSM-5, demonstrating an understanding of the risks and benefits of treatment to the client. You do need to include an APA reference for the treatment approach and any other resources you use to support your response.

CASE PRESENTATION – SANTIAGO

Intake Date: July 2020

IDENTIFYING/DEMOGRAPHIC DATA: Santiago is an 11-year-old Hispanic male who lives with his grandmother and mother Sofia in Nogales, Arizona. Santiago’s father has not been in his life over the past two years.

CHIEF COMPLAINT/PRESENTING PROBLEM: Two years ago Santiago stopped talking and lost his hearing and sight. The medical doctors cannot find any physical reasons for his challenges. After many visits to doctors they decided to bring Santiago to a clinical social worker.

HISTORY OF PRESENT ILLNESS: Santiago and his family live in a gang ridden area in Nogales. Sofia’s husband Juan wasprotecting Sofia from being attacked by a gang leader and Santiago watched his father shoot the gang leader as he was attempting to attack Sofia. When Sofia and Juan realized that Santiago saw this, they feared for his life and worried he may say something about this murder. Sofia violently shook Santiago telling him he did not see or hear anything. Two months later Santiago lost his sense of hearing, seeing, and speaking.

PAST PSYCHIATRIC HISTORY: This is the first psychiatric visit for Santiago.

SUBSTANCE USE HISTORY: There is no reported substance use for Santiago.

PAST MEDICAL HISTORY: Santiago had wellness checks from the time he was born. There were no medical issues other the normal childhood illnesses.

FAMILY HISTORY INCLUDING MEDICAL AND PSYCHIATRIC: No reported medical or psychiatric family issues.

CURRENT FAMILY ISSUES AND DYNAMICS: Santiago was a good student up to 9 years old. His parents helped Santiago stay focused on his studies, wanting more for him outside the neighborhood. Since Sofia’s mother was elderly and ailing they were not prepared to leave the area yet but had future plans of doing that. Santiago has never been in trouble at school or at home. His parents have kept him isolated, with few friends, due to their worry about Santiago getting involved with gang activity.

After the death of the gang leader Juan decided to leave the area to protect his family. At this point, it is unknown if Juan is alive or not.

Santiago does not engage with others, including his mother and grandmother. He only responds to a man on the street who plays the guitar in the street for money. Sofia and Santiago encounter this man when they go to the bodega. Santiago likes to just sit there, but they typically do not stay long since Sofia fears the neighborhood.

Santiago is no longer in school.

MENTAL STATUS EXAM: The social worker was unable to do a full mental status exam with Santiago since he was mostly catatonic.