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Winning BI Organization Designs

1

Departmental vs. Enterprise BI

Source: Howson

2

Departmental, Enterprise and Hybrid BI

3

Source: Howson

Enterprise BI has Long Term Positive Impact

4

Source: Howson

Shared vs. Locally Dedicated BI Resources

5

Source: Howson

The Business Intelligence Competency Center (BICC) Organizational Model

6

Source: Howson

Effective BI Requires the Best People

The mindset of the average BI practitioner tends to be different from other technical practitioners

BI is a business focused technical discipline and business knowledge is critical

BI is also a client focused technical discipline. Responsiveness balanced with effective prioritization is critical

7

Source: Howson

The Business Intelligence Competency Center

8

Source: Howson

Sample BI Roles

Slides 11 – 18 describe the key BICC roles from a real company

Specifics have been changed to ensure anonymity

9

10

BI Product Manager

Accountable for turning Business Capability delivery into a Business Intelligence solution delivery roadmap aligning to enterprise strategy vision

Collaborates with Lead BI Business Analysts in understanding the business capability, business priority and applies it to the business intelligence solution delivery roadmap

Accountable for the overall delivery of the Business Intelligence solution that enables the desired business capability

Accountable for the execution and delivery of Business Intelligence Solution roadmap through series of Programs and Project(s)

11

BI Product Manager (Continued)

Collaborates and consults with the Lead BI Business Analyst, Solution Designer, Delivery Lead, Data Architect and Portfolio Managers during the initiation of program/projects to ensure a forward looking delivery pipeline enabling business capability end state vision and architecture foundation

Accountable for all aspects of the SDLC applied to the solution delivery during the execution of the business intelligence solution delivery

Partners closely with the Lead BI Business Analyst in end user adoption efforts to ensure active and effective utilization of the business intelligence solution by the business

12

Lead BI Business Analyst

Responsible for portfolio demand management. Participates in BICC Demand Management as representative of all requests for shared solutions from the BI portfolio

Ensures alignment of business needs to the enterprise BI roadmap

Responsible for socializing the BI roadmap with business users and education on data delivery strategy

Identifies opportunities for collaboration between business units

Identifies opportunities to use the enterprise data warehouse as source and additional data elements/processes needed in the enterprise data warehouse to assist in decommissioning efforts

Rationalizes existing capabilities to ensure business intelligence alignment with our business units

Identifies opportunities to leverage existing solutions as appropriate

Responsible for relationship management with business unit and business users

Accountable for driving user adoption for all solutions managed and supported by the portfolio and ensuring that solutions are meeting the business needs of the portfolio

13

Lead BI Business Analyst (Continued)

Collaborates with BI Product Manager, Portfolio manager, Solution Designer and Data Architect at initiation of projects

Accountable for the constant re-evaluation and rationalization of projects in accordance with BI strategic roadmaps

Accountable for business capability roadmap for market/portfolio as it relates to Business Intelligence support of these capabilities

14

BI Business Analyst

During Project

Point of contact for business throughout project

Liaison between business and Systems Analyst/Developer/Quality Assurance/Data Analysis as necessary

Responsible for clear understanding of business needs

Responsible for business requirements

Reviews and provides input to technical requirements

Participates in Pre user acceptance testing (UAT) and coordinates UAT

Accountable for training and communication prior to launch

15

BI Business Analyst (Continued)

Post Production

Responsible for ongoing user adoption of all solutions managed and supported by the portfolio through user groups

On going training

Reviews enhancement requests with user group prior to submittal to local demand management (In the Shared group the application BA owns the first pass of prioritization with the expectation that there will be an overall review)

Point of contact for questions

Responsible for working with IT production support to analyze break fix items

16

Responsible for design and accountable for development, automating, compiling, and preparing reports, self service/ad-hoc environment, analytical workspaces, dashboards, scorecards, statistical analysis datasets and cubes

Collect data and profile as needed

Evaluate and analyze data

Integration of that data

Development (prototyping and production build) and unit test

Responsible for developing robust and scalable business intelligence solutions through the use of strategic BI products against relational, OLAP and big data sources

Responsible for solution development that satisfies business requirements

Responsible for preparing or assisting with technical specifications

Responsible for contributing to implementation of strategic plan for information delivery

Responsible for having broad knowledge of business intelligence products and tools and being able to effectively utilize those products and tools

BI Developer

17

Accountable for the definition, planning and execution of unit and integration testing; complete system testing as appropriate

Responsible for developing accurate and complete estimates for enhancements and new business intelligence solutions

Responsible for conducting root cause analysis on production defects within business intelligence solutions

Responsible for troubleshooting production support issues

Responsible for having thorough understanding and application of System Development Life Cycle (SDLC) and Information Delivery best practices when standard enterprise BI tools

Contributes to user adoption efforts of strategic reporting, dashboards and other business intelligence solutions

BI Developer (Continued)

18

BI Data Analyst

Acts as a subject matter expert on specific aspects of data availability and usage, assisting in the arbitration of differences of data interpretations and guidance to projects, business and technology areas

Develops and maintains data derivation rules and data requirements that align with standards and regulatory compliance

Performs profiling and analysis for data anomalies or issues (moderate to complex) and drives at root cause. Plays a key role in ensuring data issues are communicated to impacted areas and remediated in a manner consistent with data standards

Actively participates in the creation and implementation of business data models. Demonstrates an understanding of overall data, data models, data relationships, mapping lineage and business rules

19

BI Data Analyst (Continued)

Partners with business analysts and customer(s) to understand the business capabilities and needs in order to create the necessary business / data requirements

Demonstrates strong working knowledge of business concepts with the ability to relate that knowledge to the applications and data

Ensures data standards (e.g. naming conventions, leveraging strategic concepts) are met over time

Partners closely with BA, SA, Data Architect and Solution Designer. Advises SAs on Required Data Elements Mapping (RDEM) and reviews the RDEM before delivery to extract, transformation and load (ETL) development

20

BI Solution Designer

Collaborates with Lead Business Analysts to understand business need and conceptualize design of a most effective solution that delivers outstanding customer experience

Partners with Business Analysts to socialize front end design options with the business and facilitate confirmation of user interface (UI) requirements.

Develops “Shrink Wrapped” BI solutions/prototypes with end state view in mind and determines project complexity and effort estimates

Supports BI project managers in project coordination associated with development, testing and release management

Maintains oversight responsibility on Information Delivery development efforts to promote best practices and provide support and direction to the development team

Conducts product evaluation and stay current with industry standards, trends and technology advances within business intelligence

Facilitates peer reviews and code checkouts to ensure delivery of high quality solutions to the business

21

BI Solution Designer (Continued)

Works with IT architects to develop overall solution architecture and support database and ETL needs as appropriate from UI perspective

Architects and develops analytic solutions based on unique analytic requirements using a variety of technologies

Provides rapid prototyping services for analytic solutions, both application and data

Provides product consulting services, ad hoc question support and entry level training for analytic tools

Reviews and provides input to technical requirements

Provides consulting services for non-BICC centric analytic solutions

Provides unit level testing for solutions

Prototypes potential solutions to assist in clarifying specific business needs

Understands how current database structures work and builds proof of concept files or views for the project which are easily transferrable to the IT development team

22

BI Portfolio Manager

Partners with the Business leads and performs a stewardship role to establish a cohesive strategy and delivery of the execution roadmap across the portfolio

Oversees resource allocation for the portfolio. Actively manages business resource allocation and capacity plans, consults on IT resource and allocation plans. Coordinates data capture, resource leveling, leadership reviews and status reporting for the portfolio

Partners with BI Product Manager and Lead BI Business Analysts to resolve conflicts and competing demands and modify tasks, sequencing, and resourcing, appropriate to maintain progress

Baselines resource utilization and identifies opportunities for improvements to reduce the time it takes to deliver BI solutions

Oversees the total cost of ownership for all projects/programs within the BI portfolio. Owns the portfolio financial plan and partners closely with IT to consult on the IT financial plan. Coordinates financial data capture, leadership reviews and status reporting. Drives effectiveness, transparency and financial discipline for the annual budgeting process and the mid year reforecast process for the portfolio.

23

BI Portfolio Manager (Continued)

Accountable for portfolio status reporting including project status, resource/financial assessment, risks, issues and interdependencies. Includes effective management of change controls within the projects and across the portfolio

Compiles, manages and shares project and program interdependencies with Lead BI Business Analysts within the portfolio and across BI portfolios

Ensures high quality charters with clear scope are published via one-over-one reviews and in collaboration with Project and Program Managers

Publishes cost/benefit analyses to inform project selection with active support from BI Product Managers and Lead BI Business Analysts. Measures, publishes and reports on benefit accrual

Assures rough order of magnitude estimates (ROMs) are reasonable and within business context by ensuring Project Managers perform detailed ROM reviews with appropriate, accountable Business and IT leaders

Accountable for governance process across the portfolio. Includes conducting stage gate reviews to ensure project/program progress and control

24

BI Portfolio Manager (Continued)

Confirms high level estimates (HLEs), resource and project plans, issue and risk management and status reports will support effective delivery through close collaboration with Project and Program Managers

Ensures Project and Program Managers adhere to the established best practices and processes while implementing and employing change management procedures

Confirms Project and Program Managers plan for seamless production support transition and capture, publish, store and disseminate lessons learned to foster enterprise knowledge

Facilitates the publication and on-going management of the agreed upon service level agreements (SLAs)

Ensures effective service delivery via superior execution via services that entail, and are not limited to, conducting project reviews, assisting with expectation management and supporting PMs in Steering Committee status reporting

25

BI Project Manager

Accountable for the development and on-going execution oversight of the end–to-end Business and IT project plan to ensure successful delivery of milestones/deliverables

Manages project total cost of ownership, including financial management for both Business and IT

Consults with Portfolio Managers on business and IT resource capacity management, manages resource plans for the entire project scope, both business and IT

Publishes project charters that clearly define scope, high level milestones and resource and financial criteria

If engaged during the project initiation phase, establishes a group of business and IT subject matter experts (SMEs) to form the project organization

Within program budgets established during the annual budget forecast, facilitates the publication of comprehensive and reasonable rough order of magnitude (ROM), high level and detailed estimates with appropriate business and IT stakeholders

26

BI Project Manager

Ensures appropriate stage gate reviews occur with project phase completion

Publishes issue, risk and communication management plans to ensure effective delivery execution

Publishes project change management plans in accordance with enterprise change management procedures

Ensures release management and operational readiness plans are published and seamless transition to production support operations occurs

Collaborates with the BI Product Manager and Business Sponsor to furnish an operational definition of project closure and achieves that end state while balancing budget, schedule, quality and functionality goals

Facilitates the capture of lessons learned and stores related documentation in relevant project archives

The Case of the Endless BI RACI

Situation

The IT and business based BICC teams did not get along

At one meeting, as IT leaders sat on one side and business BI leaders sat across from them, the group reached an impasse

Your Professor offered to draft a responsibility assignment matrix (RAM) or RACI (responsible – accountable – communicated to – informed) hoping clear roles and accountability would help

Leadership agreed

What do you think happened?

27

The Case of the Endless BI RACI (Cont’d)

Result

The resulting RACI document endured through three organizational changes

Your Prof became perceived as the “RACI guy” and facilitated each time. He learned defining and gaining support for roles and accountability takes extreme amounts of time

Morals

Documented accountability helps resolve conflict

When people are asked to confirm their accountability, they will “split hairs” and generate extended dialog. Engage ready to drive or you will be consumed whole

If you’re perceived to be good at something you will own it until you leave the company

28

Sample BI RACI Fragment

29

The Tragedy of the Commons

It makes sense to build one enterprise solution vs. multiple solutions that cost more, but

Individual interests conflict with the common good and

Individuals will pursue their own gain at the expense of the group

30

The Prisoner’s Dilemma

Two players who are arrested for an offense. Each player has two strategies, “confess” or “don’t confess:”

If one player confesses and the other does not then the one that does not goes free while the other receives the maximum ten year sentence

If both players confess then they each receive a five year sentence

If neither confesses they both receive six months in jail for a lesser offense

Players must confess or not confess and neither knows about the outcome until the end of the investigation

How should the players act?

The players’ only concern is maximizing their own payoff with no concern for others so the best result is for both players to not confess even though the societal reward would be greater if they did so

 The player’s best option in this “game” is to maximize their own benefit and not confess! 

31

Examples of the Prisoner’s Dilemma in BI

The following examples show the concept of maximizing one’s own benefit over benefits for the enterprise

The resulting contortions exemplify why you will stand out positively if you think about the enterprise

32

Example 1: Self Preservation Drives Improvement

Situation

Sales reps and region managers purchased and installed contact management software on their personal laptops

While Headquarters (HQ) did not initially support their efforts they eventually agreed to purchase laptops for the sales force

Prospecting data was transmitted from the home office to the sales force. The only data HQ captured in return was lost deal information

What do you think happened?

33

Example 1: Self Preservation Drives Improvement (Cont’d)

Result

In pursuing benefit for themselves the sales force demonstrated the benefits of automating their sales prospecting process, “pulling” HQ along

34

Example 2: BI as a Political “Hot Potato”

Situation

A company purchased an enterprise resource planning (ERP) system

This ERP system supposedly contained good predefined reports and an easy to use ad hoc self service environment

Enterprise leadership instituted a centralized BI approach, hired a BICC and installed that team in the United States

Leadership thought the only additional development they required was an executive information system (EIS) for senior management

IT owned BI

The organization’s initial design looked like the graphic on the next page

35

Example 2 (Continued): Group IT and the EIS/MIS COE

The Enterprise ERP

A Shared Resource

The ERP’s

Reporting and

Self Service

Application

Happy Users in

All Geographies,

1 Business Unit

Supported by a single BICC

Big Assumption: This approach would work for everyone…

36

Example 2 (Continued): Trouble Brews

Situation

When the ERP was implemented:

Self service and ad hoc reporting access was highly complex

The vendor confirmed this was the largest data volume they ever attempted

Slow BI responsiveness was debilitating

The EIS was delayed to emphasize self service reporting improvements

European leaders drove the decision to select the ERP while the U.S. leaders did not support it. The faulty reporting environment undermined Europe’s decision so they dove into making it work

Meanwhile, the U.S. leaders watched and suggested locally developed alternatives for their user community

37

Example 2(Continued): A Hybrid Results

Situation

As IT scrambled to make the ERP’s reporting infrastructure more user friendly and responsive leadership divided the business in two, creating the “U.S. business unit” and “Global business unit”

The U.S. business unit’s leadership implemented local BI solutions despite the CIO’s admonition. This undermined the company’s BICC

The Global business unit hired a team to manually generate reports and provide mentoring and support. This also undermined the company’s BICC

The BICC became a shared IT resource, managing BI infrastructure for the Global Reporting Team. The U.S. team supported their own BI solutions

The revised organization design is depicted on the next slide

38

Example 2 (Continued): Resulting BI Federation

The ERP

A Shared Resource

ERP

Reporting and

Self Service

Application

Happy Users

Supported by the

Global Reporting

Team

Supported by the BICC

Supported by the Global Reporting

Team

Local U.S.

BI Solutions

Supported by U.S. IT

Happy Users

Supported

By U.S. IT

39

Example 2 (Continued): Political Infighting

Situation

The business thought the Chief Information Officer (CIO) and IT were not aligned with their needs

The Non U.S. Chief Operating Officer (COO) and the U.S.’ Chief Financial Officer (CFO) were both strong personalities engaged in “combat”

While the CIO institutionalized many enduring procedures, he “folded” under pressure from his stronger “C Level” peers

What do you think happened?

40

Example 2 (Continued): Political Infighting (Cont’d)

Results

The result was the hybrid approach depicted on the previous slide. The two business units employed dramatically different approaches

41

Example 2 (Continued): Wasted Time and Resources at the U.S.’ Hands

Consider the U.S.’ approach

Their BI solutions were developed by people who understood the business

Their products were tuned and easy to use for their specific needs

The U.S. Chief Technology Officer (CTO) introduced local solutions for the U.S. that the CIO did not know about until after implementation

The shared IT team could not respond effectively to local U.S. demand

The U.S. CTO and CFO both were gleeful their local needs were met

The U.S. CTO held a dual role as the U.S. CTO, accountable to the U.S. and the senior IT leader accountable for the BICC (an abused conflict of interest)

With minimal adjustment the entire company would have benefitted if the U.S. had shared their BI solutions. This was disappointing!

42

Example 2 (Continued): Wasted Time and Resources at Non U.S.’ Hands

Consider the Global (non U.S.) approach

Their COO drove the ERP’s selection and had to ensure his decision was sound

This COO’s personal prestige suffered when the ERP’s reporting was found lacking

He took focus off his complicity by scapegoating the U.S. based BICC

He created the Global Reporting Team to repudiate “poor U.S. management.” His unsaid objective remained proving his ERP decision was sound

A former underwriter with no technical knowledge led the Global Reporting Team

They employed a manually intensive solution to address challenges that technical solutions would have addressed more efficiently

43

Example 2 (Continued): Conclusions

The CIO should have fostered a better IT and Business partnership. He should have

Collaborated with both his business units from a position of strength

Driven sharing the U.S.’ BI solutions with the enterprise and developed enterprise solutions leveraging their success and using them as a foundation

Brokered agreements between the business units to quell their gamesmanship while supporting his employees

After the delay, executive information system (EIS) was not considered again for several years

44

Example 5 (Continued): The BI Replacements

Situation

When new management assumed ownership of the under-the-desk Access based applications, they decided to lay off everyone except three employees and hired a new team with previous BI experience to replace them

 Couldn’t any of these people be retrained?

Source: Howson

45

Example 7: From the Tragedy to the Commons

Situation

A BICC was established to focus on a business unit. Meanwhile, several other BICCs existed around the organization

A healthy competition grew between the new BICC and the others

During this time, the BICC’s leadership often referenced the enterprise data warehouse with derision for a perceived lack of delivery effectiveness

Later, this BICC assumed ownership of that data warehouse

What do you think happened?

46

Example 7: From the Tragedy to the Commons (Cont’d)

Results

A “Pillar of Strength” program was initiated to incorporate the enterprise data warehouse + data marts + dashboards for better return on investment (ROI)

Management was forced to consider the common good via its new, enterprise responsibilities

47

BI Delivery Models vs. Organization Charts

In a matrix organization, project teams are comprised of workers from various organizations

A BI delivery model ensures workers consider delivery as their primary goal

When delivering a BI solution, leaders don’t ask “what organization do are you from?” Instead, they say, “Give me a solution”

48

49

Sample Delivery Model

50

Demand Management and the Delivery Model

Track

Track

Track

Track

Track

Track

Prioritized Demand Pipelines by Track:

Higher throughput

More business value

Happy customers!

Reference List

Howson, C. (2014). Successful business intelligence: Unlock the value

of BI and big data. New York. McGraw Hill Education.

ISBN: 9780071809184

51

Responsibility Assignment Matrix

Senior LeadershipLead BI Business AnalystBI Product ManagerBI ArchitectBI Portfolio ManagerIT Finance/Resource ManagerProduction Support ManagerBI Project ManagerBI Business AnalystBI Data AnalystSystem AnalystData ModelerDatabase AdministratorBI Solution DesignerAnalytic Solutions DeveloperData Services LeadFramework DeveloperUI DeveloperData Services Tec lead

*

Data Services DeveloperQA Lead

*

QA TesterRelease ManagerCompetency Lead

Senior Leadership

Business Intelligence Core Strategy Direction and Organizational prioritiesACCCCIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII

Competency

Information Delivery Strategy Alignment to core business strategies A

Application Architecture Strategy alignment to core business strategies A

Adherence to best practices A

Delivery Model, RACI & SDLC Maintenance A

Internal Project Audits A

Test Strategy A

Portfolio

Implementation of business engagement modelACIC

Identification/Rationalization of Business CapabilitiesACII

Turning Business Intelligence Strategy into Program/Project RoadmapCACC

Establish Architecture roadmap to support the productCCAC

Demand Management(prioritization & facilitation)

Business Prioritization ACIII

Impact Analysis of Business ProcessesAIIII

Impact Analysis of IT SystemsICAICCCCC

Business Resource Allocation/Capacity PlanCAICCR

IT Resource Allocations/Capacity Plan CCACCIR

Total Cost of Ownership, Business + ITCCCACCCCC

IT Financial ManagementIARRC

Business Financial ManagementAIRC

Managing of Cross-Portfolio InterdependenciesCCCACIC

Relationship management with SME communityAIIII

BUSINESS & IT LEADSName & NameBICCBA – NameDQ/Data SME – NameFront End Dev – Name IT PM – NameTech Lead – NameSA – NameDM – NameDBA – NameQA – NameETL Off-shore Dev – Name BUSINESS IMPROVEMENT PROJECTSBUSINESS PORTFOLIO MANAGER: NameIT PORTFOLIO LEAD: NameSTRATEGICDATA MOVEMENTITPM – NameTech Lead – NameSA/DA – NameDM – NameETL On-shore Dev -NameETL Off-shore Dev – NameQA -NameRel Mgmt – Name BICCBA – NameDQ/Data SME – NameFront End Dev – NameReport Dev – Name NameIT On-shore Cord – NameOff-shore Dev – Name Report Exec – Name Incident Mgmt – Name Enhancements – Name Ad-hoc – Name Inquiries – Name QA – NameBICCBA – NameDQ/Data SME – NamePRODUCTION SUPPORTDASHBOARDSBICC BA – NameSol. Designer – NameFront End Dev – Name ITPM – NameDM – NameDBA – NameETL Dev – NameQA – NameRel Mgmt – NameSHARED BI SERVICESBICCPM* – NameBA – NameFront End Designer – NameFront End Dev – Name Offshore TeamsOn-shore coordinators – NameOff-shore Dev – NameARCHITECTURE SUPPORT – NameDEMAND MANAGEMENT, TRAINING & USER ADOPTION – BUSINESS ARCHITECTSName, Name (?), Name (?)NameNameDATA GOVERNANCE & DATA MANAGEMENT – NameNameNameBUSINESS INSURANCE SHARED FUNCTIONSDATA MIGRATIONINFORMATION DELIVERYAPPLICATION MGMT & LEGACY REPORTINGSELF SERVICE, REPORTS, ANALYTICS & PROTOTYPINGBICCBA – NameFramework Dev – NameFront End Dev – NameReport Dev – NameDQ/Data SME – Name IT* SA/DA – Name DM – Name ETL Dev -Name QA -Name* On as needed basis Name

Name Title

Name Title

Name Title

Name Title

Name Title

Name Title

Team Title�

Name Title

Company Name �

Company Name Department Name�

IT On-shore Cord – Name Off-shore Dev – Name Report Exec – Name Incident Mgmt – Name Enhancements – Name Ad-hoc – Name Inquiries – Name QA – Name BICC BA – Name DQ/Data SME – Name

BUSINESS & IT LEADS Name & Name

BUSINESS PORTFOLIO MANAGER: Name IT PORTFOLIO LEAD: Name

PRODUCTION SUPPORT

STRATEGIC DATA MOVEMENT

IT PM – Name Tech Lead – Name SA/DA – Name DM – Name ETL On-shore Dev -Name ETL Off-shore Dev – Name QA -Name Rel Mgmt – Name BICC BA – Name DQ/Data SME – Name Front End Dev – Name Report Dev – Name

BUSINESS IMPROVEMENT PROJECTS

Name

DASHBOARDS

SELF SERVICE, REPORTS, ANALYTICS & PROTOTYPING

BICC BA – Name Framework Dev – Name Front End Dev – Name Report Dev – Name DQ/Data SME – Name IT* SA/DA – Name DM – Name ETL Dev -Name QA -Name * On as needed basis

Name

BICC BA – Name Sol. Designer – Name Front End Dev – Name IT PM – Name DM – Name DBA – Name ETL Dev – Name QA – Name Rel Mgmt – Name

SHARED BI SERVICES

BICC PM* – Name BA – Name Front End Designer – Name Front End Dev – Name Offshore Teams On-shore coordinators – Name Off-shore Dev – Name

ARCHITECTURE SUPPORT – Name

BICC BA – Name DQ/Data SME – Name Front End Dev – Name IT PM – Name Tech Lead – Name SA – Name DM – Name DBA – Name QA – Name ETL Off-shore Dev – Name

Name

DEMAND MANAGEMENT, TRAINING & USER ADOPTION – BUSINESS ARCHITECTS Name, Name (?), Name (?)

Name

Name

DATA GOVERNANCE & DATA MANAGEMENT – Name

Name

BUSINESS INSURANCE SHARED FUNCTIONS

DATA MIGRATION

INFORMATION DELIVERY

APPLICATION MGMT & LEGACY REPORTING

PORTFOLIO LEADERS

BUSINESS

IMPROVEMENT

PROJECTS

PORTFOLIO MANAGEMENT

STRATEGIC

DATA MOVEMENT

PRODUCTION SUPPORT

DASHBOARDS

SHARED BI SERVICES

(Example: Finance

Data Strategy)

DEMAND MANAGEMENT, TRAINING & USER ADOPTION – BUSINESS ARCHITECTS

DATA MIGRATION

INFORMATION DELIVERY

APPLICATION MGMT &

LEGACY REPORTING

SELF SERVICE,

REPORTS, ANALYTICS

& PROTOTYPING

Name Title

Name Title

Name Title

Name Title

Name Title

Name Title

Team Title�

Name Title

Company Name �

Company Name Department Name�

PORTFOLIO LEADERS

PORTFOLIO MANAGEMENT

PRODUCTION SUPPORT

STRATEGIC DATA MOVEMENT

BUSINESS IMPROVEMENT PROJECTS

DASHBOARDS

SELF SERVICE, REPORTS, ANALYTICS & PROTOTYPING

SHARED BI SERVICES (Example: Finance Data Strategy)

DEMAND MANAGEMENT, TRAINING & USER ADOPTION – BUSINESS ARCHITECTS

DATA MIGRATION

INFORMATION DELIVERY

APPLICATION MGMT & LEGACY REPORTING

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