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This is a graded discussion: 25 points possible due Sep 14 at 1:59am

Week 2 Discussion: Your Political Socialization 21 21

Required Resources Read/review the following resources for this activity:

Initial Post Instructions Political socialization begins young. Think about conversations around politics when you were in primary school (around age 10). Maybe there was a natural disaster in your area such as a hurricane and government response levels were critiqued. What were some of the ways you learned about the political establishment through family members and friends? How were you politically socialized as a child? Use evidence (cite sources) to support your response from assigned readings or online lessons, and at least one outside scholarly source.

Follow-Up Post Instructions Respond to at least two peers or one peer and the instructor. Further the dialogue by providing more information and clarification. Minimum of 1 scholarly source, which can include your textbook or assigned readings or may be from your additional scholarly research.

Writing Requirements

Grading This activity will be graded using the Discussion Grading Rubric. Please review the following link:

Course Outcomes (CO): 4

Due Date for Initial Post: By 11:59 p.m. MT on Wednesday

Textbook: Chapter 3, 6 Lesson Minimum of 1 scholarly source (in addition to the textbook)

Minimum of 3 posts (1 initial & 2 follow-up) Minimum of 2 sources cited (assigned readings/online lessons and an outside scholarly source) APA format for in-text citations and list of references

Link (webpage): Discussion Guidelines

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(https://chamberlain.instructure.com/courses/68288/users/72720)Samuel Angus (Instructor) Aug 19, 2020

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Class,

Whan I was around ten years old, Ronald Reagan was President. I remember listening to my parents complain about the fact that my grandparents had become Reagan Democrats. I also remember listening to their records (Bob Dylan, Janis Joplin, Joan Baez, Tom Lehrer, etc.). I remember listening to songs like this (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JPrAuF2f_oI)

(https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JPrAuF2f_oI) , this (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e7qQ6_RV4VQ)

(https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e7qQ6_RV4VQ) , and this. (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sKvdPsnkPC0)

(https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sKvdPsnkPC0)

I certainly remember listening to NPR, PBS, network news, and more with my father. I also listened to the news and read the papers on my own. I attended a ‘liberal’ Christian Church (UCC) in a manufacturing town (Flint) as the grandchild of autoworkers. I also attended a magnet/gifted education program. So, which of these was most important in shaping the citizen I would become, the manner in which I would come to engage in politics, the way in which I would consume news, and more?

“One of the most notable changes in the media landscape over the past ten years has been the advent of social media.” (Whitman, 133) How might my political socialization have been different if all of the above were true, except Trump was president rather than Reagan and I had access to Twitter, Facebook, etc.?

Sam

PS I can’t wait to see what you all share!!

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Stacey Ryle (https://chamberlain.instructure.com/courses/68288/users/117098) Sunday

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9/8/20, 10:29 PM Page 4 of 23

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Professor and Class,

In 1984, I was ten years old. There were many current events that took place during this year but one political event that stood out in my mind because it was discussed all the time in my house between my parents that year. Walter Mondale named Geraldine Ferraro as his vice presidential candidate in the 1984 election against Ronald Reagan. Ferrar was the first woman to receive such a nomination and was a big deal in this country for alot of people, especially woman. Kennedy, 2020 states,” It was the a euphoric movement in American politics.” It was definitely a big deal in my house. I grew up with two very liberal/democratic parents and from the time I can remember, it was instilled upon me that a woman was a man’s equal and that they were certainly capable of doing anything a man could do. This election was very important to my parents so I became important to me as well. They felt the country could use a woman as vice-president and were excited for the possiblilities. The television was constantly on with debates and news coverage of the election. Everynight at the dinner table, my parents would discuss it. They would explain to me what Mondale and Ferrara stood for and how this would positively effect us individually, as a family and as a country. “Even before their old enough to vote, children of Democrats tend to become Democrats and children of Republicans as Republicans” (Jacewicz, 2017). I looked up to both my parents so I automatically wanted what they wanted and fet tht this was the “right way.” We would frequently jave discussions about what my parents felt was wrong about the way Ronald Reagan was running the country and why. They would even try to give me examples so I could understand and relate to it

Today, even at 46 years old, I still hold the same beliefs and continue to support the Democratic party for the most part. As a young adult, I certainly developed my own beliefs and was exposed to other’s beliefs and opinions. In the end, the family I was raised in, shaped who I became today and what I believe in and stand for.

Thank you

Stacey Ryle

References

Jacewica, N. (2017). What shapes your political beliefs at 18, 35, and 50. Retrieved from https://www.thecut.com/2017/what-shapes-your-political-beliefs. (https://www.thecut.com/2017/what-shapes-your)

Kennedy, L.(2020). Geraldine Ferraro’s 1984 VP nomination was historic, but failed to clinch a win. Retrieved from: https://www.history.com/news/geraldine-ferraro-vice-presidential-candidate.

(https://www.history.com/news/geraldine-ferraro-vice-presidential)

WhitmanCobb, W.N.(2020). Political science today. (1st ed.) Washington, DC: Sage CQ press.

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(https://chamberlain.instructure.com/courses/68288/users/72720)Samuel Angus (Instructor) Yesterday

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FEMALE VICE PRESIDENT Stacey and Class,

In 1984 Geraldine Ferraro was chosen to be the Democratic candidate for Vice President. In 2008 Sarah Palin was nominated to be the Republican candidate for Vice President. In 2020 Kamala Harris received the democratic nomination for Vice President. How did/will these events shape young folks’ political socialization (the development of values, attitudes, beliefs, and opinions which shape our relationship with the political system). Can seeing a woman be nominated for Vice President instill more belief in gender equality? Can it have other impacts?

Sam

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Lindsay Holton (https://chamberlain.instructure.com/courses/68288/users/150366) 11:52am

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Stacy,

I appreciate your post and agree with your quote on how children grow up becoming what their parents instilled in them. I was not alive during this debate, but I can understand how significant it is now as we see firsts for women all the time. For example, Michelle Obama being the first African American first lady, Lindsay Van being the first to complete in women’s ski jump during Olympics, or Taylor Swift being the first women to win album of the year. Now I grew up knowing these first, which might not be as significant as choosing Vice President, but none the less still women breaking ground in new things, creating a more equal gender playing ground. Do you believe the gender biases will continue beyond our lifetime? I think we have come along way, but I still see men leading the pack and I do not have the answer on how to fix it.

You discussed how you still believe in what your parents have influence you, and I agree as it is the same for me. I could argue if I was not close to my family, and I tried to somewhat rebel against them then I might learn from different outlets. According to the Journalism and Mass Communication Quarterly (2011), socialization into politics are strongly influenced by media alone among adolescents as they seek to be influenced by others outside their family views. I find this interesting, if I did not want to believe in my parent’s views, I probably would seek other terms of influence. Could you agree, maybe if we did not want to believe our parents, would you look into the media, or even friends for political viewpoints to follow? Thinking back to my adolescents, I would probably tend to believe what my friends or celebrities I followed think which seems like very influential groups to adolescents.

Lindsay Holton

Warren, R. & Wicks, R.H. (2011). Political socialization: Modeling teen political and civic engagement. Journalism and Mass Communication Quarterly, 88(1), 156-175. https://search- proquest-com.chamberlainuniversity.idm.oclc.org/docview/864043359? accountid=147674 (https://search-proquest- com.chamberlainuniversity.idm.oclc.org/docview/864043359?accountid=147674)

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Kylie King (https://chamberlain.instructure.com/courses/68288/users/169214) Sunday

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Week 2 Discussion: Your Political Socialization Professor and Class,

There are bits and pieces of my childhood that I remember any political involvement. Now, political development is a concept that I took in different ways. The first being something along the lines of the election and the second being around our justice system. With that being said, the political establishment is a broad spectrum of terms. For me, my parents have always had a very structured household. I always knew right from wrong thanks to them and that was one way I learned about the political establishment. Society has views of right and wrong, which is why I think this is a major contributor to political development. Rawls also has an opinion when it comes to the justice system from a political standpoint on society. Author Wendy Whitman explains this idea when she states, “Rawls advocates that the only way to ensure a just society, a just government, is to make sure that everyone is not only treated fairly and equally but that everyone is fair and equal. Justice as fairness is really justice is fairness.” (Whitman 63&64, 2019). Rawls was born in the 1920s, and this is a concept or close concept to what is believed in today. Another source of political development would be for those who are in school. School is mandatory for children from Kindergarten to Senior. Our government put that in place along with something that we just grew up doing. Can you guess what that something is? Well, since I can remember, The Pledge of Allegiance was something that was done every single morning to start the school day. School involvement with politics is touchy. According to multiple authors, children and their relation to school is, “in many and perhaps even most instances, youth involvement in politics is a matter of contention” (Patterson et al, 2020). In my time in elementary school, this was something students could relate to. I was in elementary school when Barack Obama addressed the children of the United States. My school agreed to show his address. Now, not every school did that. In my experience, socialization had to come from being in school and the media. I can’t ever remember a time, until my early 20s, where I ever talked politics like the presidency and/or election with my parents.

Kylie King

Cobb, W. W. (2019). VitalSource Bookshelf Online. Retrieved September 06, 2020, from https://online.vitalsource.com/ (https://online.vitalsource.com/)

Patterson, M. M., Bigler, R. S., Pahlke, E., Brown, C., Hayes, A., Ramirez, C. M., & Nelson, A. (2019, September 13). Toward a Developmental Science of Politics. September 06, 2020, http://dx.doi.org.chamberlainuniversity.idm.oclc.org/10.1111/mono.12410 (http://dx.doi.org.chamberlainuniversity.idm.oclc.org/10.1111/mono.12410)

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(https://chamberlain.instructure.com/courses/68288/users/72720)Samuel Angus (Instructor) Yesterday

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THE HOW OF POLITICAL EDUCATION Kylie and Class,

Is school is the most important site for political socialization? Why or why not?

How should kids learn about government and politics at school? How should they be socialized? Through the recitation of the Pledge of Allegiance? In other ways?

What should the goal be of political socialization in school?

When should kids start learning about government and politics in school? In middle school? In high school? In elementary school? In preschool?

Sam

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Breanna Majzel (https://chamberlain.instructure.com/courses/68288/users/126719) 6:50pm

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Dear Professor,

Children still need to be taught politics and government issues in school, but in an appropriate way. People, including both students and teachers, get very defensive in discussions under these topics, and it could make students uncomfortable to share their opinions and point of view. According to Political Science Today, you need to watch which medias you are reading or watching, an example is MSNBC versus Fox News (Cobb, 2020) Both of these media sites focus on different political sides, and this is something you need to stay away from for students in class, you need information that is neutral, or supports both sides (Cobb, 2020) People need to be profession about politics, you need to respect others opinions, they have the right to freedom of speech, and there is nothing you can do to control their opinions, you wouldn’t want someone making you feel bad about your political opinions, so people need to respect someone else’s.

We need to learn about the constitution and history of America. We need students to learn about World War I and II, the Civil War, Pearl Harbor, 9/11, our past Presidents, and in a decade, the youth need to learn about the pandemic going on. I think it is important to start learning history early on through high school, and then the constitution in 8th grade before high school. Even a current events class is informational, but it needs to be taught in a neutral format.

The Pledge of Allegiance and Star Spangled Banner should be recited in preschool throughout high school to show our love and respect for our country, to support those who are serving our country, for those keeping us safe. I find doing these things very respectful. My boyfriend is in the Marines right now and has been gone since April 26th, and will not be able to come home until Christmas if we are lucky. I cannot even go to Virginia, where he is stationed, to visit him. No one can come onto base, and no one can leave their base. My boyfriend has left his family, friends, and me for over seven months to serve his country, which is something that people do every year. This happens to families all the time who have loved ones stationed over seas, and the least we can do to respect those out there protecting us, is recite the Pledge of Allegiance. It is something ever kid needs to be taught in school, every morning from kindergarten though my senior year I recited the Pledge of Allegiance and the Bullying Pledge, and I wouldn’t have it any other way.

Cobb, W.N.W. (2020). Political Science Today. Sage: CQ Press

(https://chamberlain.instructure.com/courses/68288/users/72720)Samuel Angus (Instructor) Yesterday

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MODERN AND CLASSICAL LIBERALISM Class,

What is modern liberalism? What is classical liberalism? How do they differ from one another?

Sam

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Angela Walker (https://chamberlain.instructure.com/courses/68288/users/169532) Yesterday

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Classical liberalism was the belief that a king or religion should not rule people. The people should decide the ruler, and he could be overthrown if there was a breach in his obligations to the people. That an “individual should be as free as possible to conduct themselves however they see fit” (Cobb, pp. 60, 2020). Classical liberalism believed that it was the government’s job to protect the people from others that want to harm them while not infringing on an individual’s right to live how they choose. They also recognize that the government can impair a person’s right to live freely. The early liberals came about after the end of the English Civil War (Cobb, pp. 58, 2020) when people were ruled by kings and used religion to justify their rules. Over time these beliefs evolved, but the guiding principle remains the same, a person’s right to equality and freedom to live how they choose. These beliefs paved the way for women’s rights and the lifting of laws against homosexuality (Cobb, pp 60, 2020).

Modern liberalism recognized that they had achieved many of the inequalities by the nineteenth century. They then focused on individual freedoms, such as wealth, health insurance, education, and discrimination (“liberalism | Definition, History, & Facts,” 2020). For these inequalities, they looked to the government for positive changes. The government helped diminish some of these equalities by enacting government assistance, public schools, and hospitals, programs, and services for the disabled. We as a society have come a long way; modern liberalist is still fighting for a person’s right to equality and freedom to live how they choose.

References

Cobb, W. (2020). Political Science Today. SAGE Publications Ltd.

Liberalism | Definition, History, & Facts. Encyclopedia Britannica. (2020). Retrieved 8 September 2020, from https://www.britannica.com/topic/liberalism.

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(https://chamberlain.instructure.com/courses/68288/users/72720)Samuel Angus (Instructor) 7:12am

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MODERN CONSERVATISM Class,

What is modern conservatism? What are its origins? What are its key characteristics?

Modern conservatism is often equated with classical liberalism, but there are key differences. What are they?

Modern conservatism is often associated with the Republican party. Has this always been true? Is it true now?

Sam

(https://chamberlain.instructure.com/courses/68288/users/72720)Samuel Angus (Instructor) 7:13am

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LIBERTARIANISM Class,

What is libertarianism? Can you compare and contrast it with classical liberalism, modern liberalism, and modern conservatism?

Sam

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Lindsay Holton (https://chamberlain.instructure.com/courses/68288/users/150366) 11:42am

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Your Political Socialization

Professor Angus and class,

Media has a huge role in socialization, as the beliefs, values, and ideals are expressed through media in which we watch or read, and the content is directly related to what that news outlet wants you to see (Whitman, 2020). When I was ten, I was in fifth grade, and although I do not remember any local issues in my area, the most significant event happened to our country, on September 11 , 2001. The twin towers were attacked which left a huge impact on our country and really made me listen more to my parents when debating the political agenda’s the media was expressing. I remember President George Bush speaking terms like “War on Terror” or “Weapons of Mass Destruction” and not understand the full effect of what is going on. Listening to my parents from this event on did influence the way I think. But as parents teach you to become a good, respectable adult, I believe they also teach you their views. I can recall watching the same news networks that always pushed different agenda’s than other news stations. Honestly, I believe in my case, my parents subconsciously influenced my political choices. They taught me math, just like they taught me the way the world works. When I moved out of my parents’ house, I learned more on making my own independent choices, yet I still believe in what my parents have taught me. It is like I am wired exactly like they are, which to me is not a bad thing at all. So, if you are connected to a certain media outlet, then chances are you are only believing that political agenda and aren’t exactly open to changing your opinion when it comes to a different news outlet, like Fox news versus CNN. The hope is for young people to blossom into political socialized people and it is known that people are influenced by families, schools, peers, and the media (Warren & Wicks, 2011). If we did not start out being politically socialized in those areas as a young person, when would we start to become interested? I could argue that it would take me a long time to become interested if I was not already exposed when I was young. Politics is an overwhelming and controversial topic, so when to dive it would be rather intimidating.

References

Warren, R. & Wicks, R.H. (2011). Political socialization: Modeling teen political and civic engagement. Journalism and Mass Communication Quarterly, 88(1), 156-175. https://search-proquest- com.chamberlainuniversity.idm.oclc.org/docview/864043359?accountid=147674 (https://search- proquest-com.chamberlainuniversity.idm.oclc.org/docview/864043359?accountid=147674)

Whitman, W.N.C. (2020). Political Science Today (1 ed). Washington, DC: Sage. CQ Press.

th

st

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Breanna Majzel (https://chamberlain.instructure.com/courses/68288/users/126719) 6:22pm

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Dear Lindsay,

I strongly agree with your point of view on how media is very controlling on what you hear, and how parents are strong influence’s on what children hear and believe in. I was lucky enough to have supportive parents, and they have always told me no matter what my political views are, that won’t change anything between our relationship. I think having parents that are supportive with whatever your view in life may be is great, because it helps you grow into a mature, independent adult. As I stated in my original post, a scholarly article I read called, 6.2 Political Science, said how much your political opinions are based off of “interactions with adults and the media” (6.2 Political Science, 2016). This is sad to think about, that the media, who is very bias, can influence someone’s political views when the information can either be false, or not inform the other sides matter. My article talking about how it is good for families to discuss politics in their homes, and express their opinions, but it is said to say that many homes do not discuss politics (6.2 Political Socialization, 2016).

When I was in school, I was in a Current Events class my 7th grade year, and I remember how bias the teacher was. It makes it uncomfortable for children who may have different views, who feel that is they talk about their views, or do assignments with their opinions, that their grade could be compromised. We would watch CNN recaps every morning and discuss topics around the would and a huge topic we discussed was the Presidential Elections. I think it is still a topic that needs to be discussed in school, but a fair discussion, which includes valid information from both political sides of the debate.

6.2 Political Socialization. (2016, November 16). Retrieved September 08, 2020, from https://open.lib.umn.edu/americangovernment/chapter/6-2-political-socialization/ (https://open.lib.umn.edu/americangovernment/chapter/6-2-political-socialization/)

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Amelia Macchietto (https://chamberlain.instructure.com/courses/68288/users/147653) 5:42pm

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Professor Angus and Class,

I was born in 1997. This means that I was four years old when 9/11 happened and the war on terror began. I was eleven years old during the housing crisis and subsequent market crash and recession. I have now just turned twenty-three in the middle of the global pandemic. Politics have always been at the forefront of my education as so many milestones have happened in my youth. In addition to this, I grew up living between my mother’s house, which was a very conservative home, and my father’s house, which was a very liberal home. I was able to see both sides of the political spectrum up close and personal throughout my entire childhood.

Whitman Cobb (2020) defines socialization as “the process through which we acquire beliefs about the world around us” (p. 121). I can clearly see the impact my family, the political era in which I was raised, my education, and the media have played on my socialization. In my mother’s house, Fox was the only news source we watched. In my father’s house, there was a stream of news that would play for hours as he caught up on CNN, MSNBC, and more. More than anything, I can remember most clearly my mother and grandparents telling me not to trust the news, and that my teachers were trying to “make me more liberal.” It is not one political event or natural disaster that shaped my political views as a child, but the constant reiteration that everyone around me was trying to force me to become more liberal. As a result, I grew up not leaning very conservative, believing that those were the only news sources that could be trusted.

After growing past this rhetoric in my early college years, I find it very alarming to see these ideas racing across the country. Since I was so young, I thought it was just my family that acted this way and chalked it up to a strong influence from my grandparents. Unfortunately, it is clear that the distrust of the media is something that has been percolating in our country for years, and this administration has built upon that distrust to raise it to unseen levels. A 2020 research article written by Jane Suiter and Richard Fletcher studied the connections between mistrust in the media and a more partisan country. In most of the 35 countries surveyed, there was not a strong relationship between levels of media distrust and partisanship (Suiter and Fletcher, 2020). However, the United States was an exception to this finding. There are ties between growing partisanship and a distrust of the media here in the U.S.

Just as I was brought up with a distrust of media sources that my family did not follow, so will this next generation be raised. As our country becomes more divided, what I experienced will only continue to expand. However, I am hopeful that since the youth of today have more access to technology and online news media, they will be able to discern what is truly trustworthy and truly untrustworthy on their own.

Thanks for reading,

Mia

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Mia

References

Suiter, J., & Fletcher, R. (2020). Polarization and partisanship: Key drivers of distrust in media old and new? European Journal of Communication. https://doi.org/10.1177/0267323120903685 (https://doi.org/10.1177/0267323120903685)

Whitman Cobb, W. N. (2020). Political science today. Sage, CQ Press.

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Michalle Wolfe (https://chamberlain.instructure.com/courses/68288/users/169676) 6:00pm

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Being ten years old seems like forever ago, however it was memorable year in politics because it was an election year and the first one I could vaguely understand. In 1996, former President Bill Clinton was running for a second term against republican nominee Bob Dole. I remember listening to my parents the year before, along with my Aunts and Uncles, talking about how Clinton would probably not be re-elected again, and that was how the Great Thanksgiving debate of 1995 which continued on at every family event until Clinton was re-elected that November. The main point that I remember was arguing over the Government shutdown that he blamed on Clinton while my father blamed it on the Republican Party. The budget impasse of 1995/1996 had forced two partial shutdowns, one which lasted for 22 days being the longest government shutdown in history at that point (1994).

Although I was only 10 and unable to fully understand what that meant my mom took time to explain budgets and their importance on a level that I understood. She used mostly herself as my example by explaining how when she wanted to buy our house my parents both had to sit down and see where all the money they were making was going and agree on saving the rest. She said had one of them not agreed to something they would have had to continue to negotiate till they both got what they needed to be able to spend wisely while being able to save. She ended by saying that the president and the Republican Party could not agree on how to spend their money so they both had to take keep trying to find a common ground to fix things. That’s how things started to make sense, by simple explanations.

Throughout school I always enjoyed my history classes and learning how the system works, however I did not keep up with politics or anything political so it has taken a little extra research in order to remind myself how everything works. It was not until my mid-20’s that the importance of my votes from local mayor to the president because I was always more of a “my vote doesn’t really matter”person. In the Enlightenment section of our lecture it talks about how Thomas Hobbes introduces the idea of humanity as thinking for itself because citizens capable of self-thought is one of the foundations of democracy. I can relate to this because it wasn’t until I was of an age to think for myself that I was able to lay my political foundation.

The Clinton Presidency: Eight Years of Peace, Progress and Prosperity. (1994, October 20). https://clintonwhitehouse5.archives.gov/WH/Accomplishments/eightyears-02.html.

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Breanna Majzel (https://chamberlain.instructure.com/courses/68288/users/126719) 6:02pm

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Dear Professor and Class,

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According to 6.2 Political Socialization, political socialization is “political learning whereby people develop the attitudes, values, beliefs, opinions, and behaviors that are conducive to becoming good citizens in their country” (6.2 Political Socialization, 2016)

My view on the conversations about politics in primary schooling environments is not specifically the best topic to talk about as a youth in elementary school. The issue that I have had with this when I was in 6th grade, all we would watch for news coverage was CNN. We would watch CNN everyday in the morning on recaps of what was happening around the United States and the world, and although some of the information was valid and informative, others were very bias. For someone in 6th grade, at the age of 11-12, anything you are told you will believe. It is bias to one side way more than the other, and when you are that young, you don’t know any different. I, on the other hand, was very into politics at that age for some reason. I remember talking politics for hours on hours about the 2012 Presidential Election. I remember I stayed up all night watching the finally tallies and to me, politics were very interesting at that time. Although I did only hear my parents side of their political view, which I agreed with, they also told me the opposing side and made sure to let me know it was okay to think overwise than their opinions, because it was my opinion. I noticed our school topics and conversations were very much bias. I, of course, knew that your political opinion was not meant to be talked about in public, so I always kept my opinions to myself, but it made me know at the age of 11-12 in 6th grade how bias some news channels can be, we are only teaching kids one side of the arguments. I am not going to lie though, now I do not watch the news or follow along with politics right now because everything has be too overwhelming with our current nation situations, I just don’t like how divided the United States is right now, so to ease some of my stress in life, I now just stay out of the media, and news about politics.

With all of that being said, I do think it is important for some news to be taught in youth schools, there just needs to be a line when political topics are brought up at that age. For example, May 2, 2011, Osama Bin Laden was killed and I remember as a fifth grader watching it on the news in school and being so interested in it. It was a huge deal for the United States of America and something like that needed to be discussed and taught in school. Another topic that was a huge deal my 7th grade year of junior high was the school shooting in Sandy Hook Elementary School that happened, I remember watching videos and learning all about it. It was very scary to hear about, but was something that needed to come to students awareness and something we needed to learn about.

As said in Political Science Today, Chapter Six, “Individual reporters and editors, whether they do it on purpose or not, can introduce elements of bias into the news, Some of the information we receive may be false or inaccurate” (Cobb, 2020). Whether teachers are aware of that of not, they need to just be careful when presenting media-related information to youth students. In my scholarly article that I have read, it states how youth opinions are based off their “interactions with adults and the media” (6.2 Political Socialization, 2016). This backs up my point of how much influence an adult in your life, or the news can help determine your view on politics.

Cobb, W.N.W. (2020). Political Science Today. Sage: CQ Press

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6.2 Political Socialization. (2016, November 16). Retrieved September 08, 2020, from https://open.lib.umn.edu/americangovernment/chapter/6-2-political-socialization/ (https://open.lib.umn.edu/americangovernment/chapter/6-2-political-socialization/)

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Emily Fox (https://chamberlain.instructure.com/courses/68288/users/148024) 7:36pm

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Professor and class,

I was raised by two democrats. My parents lived in San Francisco in the 70’s and I was born in a town called Happy Camp in Northern California. However, my first memory regarding politics was the evening of the Dukakis/Bush Sr. election in 1988. I was almost 8 years old and all I knew was that my dad wanted Dukakis to win, so therefore, I did too. I remember waking up the morning after the election and my first question to my Dad was, “who won?” Looking back, I noticed he seemed disappointed but it would be years before I realized how hard it can hit when you vote for someone you truly believe can do the job and they lose. (Ahem, 2016). But I digress, my parents never talked about politics with my siblings and myself until we were much older. They did, however, talk about social issues. They mentioned things like minimum wage should be higher, and everyone should be able to have healthcare. I find it interesting that they didn’t push their political beliefs on me, but I still grew up to be a liberal based solely on the issues they once spoke about and doing my own research and figuring out what I believed in. I love what analogy our textbook uses about making our own definitions. “What makes your definition of a good or bad burger better than someone else’s? A vegetarian might not agree with someone else’s conception of good being a perfectly medium rare beef patty with all the fixings.” (Whitman, 2020) There are two sides to every story. I’ve found that more times than not you will not change someone else’s mind. A good discussion never hurt anyone though so I try to be open minded in all things.

WhitmanCobb, W.N.(2020). Political science today. (1st ed.) Washington, DC: Sage CQ press.

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Emily Fox (https://chamberlain.instructure.com/courses/68288/users/148024) 7:44pm

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As for social media, I think it’s a double edged sword. There are some informative news outlets but they are hard to distinguish from the conspiracy theorists who actually make up lies. I believe both sides do it so no one is exempt. It really takes some research to find the truth, or at least as close to the truth as possible.

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Heather VanDewark (https://chamberlain.instructure.com/courses/68288/users/50995) 10:26pm

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Emily,

I was in the same boat with politics when I was a child. We were the children and our parents did not discuss adult topics with us, until we were what they considered adults. I also remember how their opinions influence my own regarding any situation, much like I feel social media can do to people who have no knowledge of the situation. I think that it is ironic, how now, that I openly talk to my daughter about issues and allow her to share her own opinions and feelings on the topic. We talk about other’s responses and how they make her feel, we encourage her to research other’s opinions and their “why”. I think that educating children about how everyone can have a different opinion, will allow them to have a better acceptance of others with different ideas and beliefs. I feel that diversity in thinking is imperative to develop the best results and outcomes.

I am curious to see if you talk to children about politics and your views? Arabadjis feels that parents have already began educating their children about politics, and that is more important than ever to keep them informed and engaged in the process (2017). When do you think a good age is to start these conversations, where they can comprehend the importance behind the subject and an educated opinion?

References

Arabadjis, H. (2017). Politics Matter ‘Because parents already have been educating their children about politics, it perhaps is more important than ever to keep them informed and engaged in the political process’. USA Today, 146(2866), pg. 26. Retrieved from https://chamberlainuniversity.idm.oclc.org/login? url=https://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx? direct=true&db=edsbl&AN=RN611983577&site=eds-live&scope=site (https://chamberlainuniversity.idm.oclc.org/login?url=https://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx? direct=true&db=edsbl&AN=RN611983577&site=eds-live&scope=site)

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Traci East (https://chamberlain.instructure.com/courses/68288/users/153410) 9:05pm

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Professor and Class,

In the early 1980’s let us say 1981 which I was 8 and I remember my mom and dad discussing that Ronald Reagan was shot and was an attempted assassination. Of course, I was too young to understand the term of what that meant but knew it was bad. I remember my dad yelling at the tv for some unknown reason but realized that it was the media and he could not believe someone tried to take out the President and feeling relieved it wasn’t another assassination like President Kennedy. While looking for more information on this incident. It was later known that the power should have been given to Vice President Bush and that the 25 Amendment should have been used until President Reagan was better and back in office. This was later stated by Reagans Doctor but stated he only had one thing in mind and that was caring for the President. This was stated in the LA Times in Article in February 21, 1989 an 8-year time frame from the time Reagan was shot. This was called a Watchdog where the media call out or bring to light government actions and who are responsible for them (Whitman, p121, 2018). Media keep the story going and nothing seems to ever be dropped with the media. The media does inform the public, but it is so mainstream and a got to have it now way that social media and other news sources are constantly updating the news almost to the minute. This article went on to say that after the President was shot the Secretary of State who was Alexander M. Haig Jr. coined the phrase “As of now, I am in control here, in the White House, Pending the return of the Vice President”. I had no idea this much political socialization went on back then. The media is worse now. I did not grow up in a political household and it was not until I joined the Navy did, I realize the politics in the military. That could be a story for a different time. I grew up listening to My Sharona by the Knack, Dancing Queen by ABBA, and Centerfold by J. Geils Band. My dad and mom watched the news every night at 10pm but other than that they did not watch much political things. I was raised in a Catholic home and even went to a Catholic elementary school. Very strict and did not realized that until I went to public Junior High school where it was a culture shock and an eye opener and did not fit in to say the least.

Whitman Cobb, W. N. (2020) (p.121). Political science today. Washington, DC: Sage, CQ Press.

Reagan Doctor Says 25th Amendment Should Have Been Used in ’81. (1989, February 21). Retrieved September 09, 2020, from http://www.latimes.com/archives/la-xpm-1989-02-21-mn-112-story.html

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Dorcas Todom (https://chamberlain.instructure.com/courses/68288/users/105047) 9:31pm

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Hello professor and class.

Political socialization is the integration of the political culture and thinking into an individual’s mind (Cobb, 2020). Kids naturally grow with schooling and other basic interests on their minds. With time, natural, social and economic issues introduce them to the world of politics (Torney, 2017). A series of wildfires in California remind me of my earliest interest in what the government ought to do in times of disasters. The month of October, 2007 is still vivid in my memory when probably the worst wildfire occurred.

The extent of this particular wildfire got the whole country talking about who was responsible for what role? How else could it have been handled? If a certain person was in power, how could he have handled the situation? With all these talks and criticism, I developed interest in knowing the different roles of levels of government as well as the influence of the politics on such issues (Palinkas, 2020).

Through television, it is natural for one to get political information and opinion from parents and immediate relatives. Newspapers also introduced me to the existing political parties, their strongholds, and the values that are dear to them. These platforms created the basis of my understanding of the political world due to the frequency of watching news for example, reading newspapers or from political opinions or arguments between family members.

The different political stance in the family towards the 2008 election also caught my attention and I quickly developed that urge to know what comes next and who will turn out victorious in a particular position. In some of these arguments it was clear that I should identify with ideas on one side as opposed to the other. Those simple opinions made me develop the attitude towards political issues to this day.

References

Cobb, W.N.W. (2020). Political Science Today. Sage: CQ Press

Palinkas, L. A. (2020). The California Wildfires. In Global Climate Change, Population Displacement, and Public Health (pp. 53-67). Springer, Cham.

Torney-Purta, J. V. (2017). The Development of Political Attitudes in Children. Routledge.

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