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Instructions

DB Post Response

In a minimum of 250 words, please provide a response to the post below, with at least one cited source. Please only use the military sources provided and one outside source if using more than one cited source.

Reference

1.TRADOC Pam 525-8-2, The Army Learning Concept for Training and Education for 2020-

2040_2017: Read chapters 2 & 3 (22 pages)

2.The Seasoned Executive’s Decision-Making Style

3.TRADOC Regulation 25-36, May 2014:  Read pages 16-25 (10 pages)

4.ADP 1-01, Doctrine Primer_2019:  Read pages. 1-1 thru 1-5 (5 pages)

5.Department of the Army. (2016) Train to Win in a Complex World (FM 7-0) Retrieved from

https://armypubs.army.mil/epubs/DR_pubs/DR_a/pdf/web/ARN9860_FM%207-0

6.Department of the Army. (2019) Training (ADP 7-0) Retrieved from https://armypubs.army.mil/epubs/DR_pubs/DR_a/pdf/web/ARN18024_ADP%207-0%

7.Department of the Army.  (2017). Army training and leader development

(AR 350-1).  Retrieved from https://armypubs.army.mil/ProductMaps/PubForm/Details.aspx?PUB_ID=1002540

Note: Rubrics attached.

DB Post # 1

DB Post # 2

Commanders develop leaders individually and collectively in the operational domain by using unit training plans.  Unit training plans allocate time to facilitate individual training and cohesive team training.  Next higher headquarters’ guidance provides the frame for lower echelons’ to create their unit training plans.  Trained individuals, and teams, in unit level tasks can then advance into multiechelon collective training.  Units nestle their training within their higher headquarters’ training plan to conduct multiechelon collective training (Department of the Army, 2019, p. 10).           Sergeants Major enable their commander’s intent, and should understand higher headquarters’ training requirements to provide subordinate units clear concise guidance.  They must identify unit strengths and weakness, while making certain leaders understand their role in training (Department of the Army, 2016, p. 17).  Sergeants Major should identify and eliminate any distractors from training, allowing units’ maximum time to train, and retrain if needed.  Leaders must facilitate top-down, and bottom-up, communication to articulate requirements from higher echelons, and hear challenges from lower echelons.  This two-way feedback allows for candid and realistic evaluation of unit training, allowing leaders to adjust training plans as needed (Department of the Army, 2016, p. 32).                       Department of the Army provides three domains in which Soldiers learn and train, self-development, institutional, and operational (2017, p. 3-4).  Soldiers implement skills learned in the self-development and institutional domain, in their operational domain.  Unit training affords Soldiers opportunities to develop their leadership skills in a controlled environment, allowing individuals to learn from mistakes made (Department of the Army, 2016, p. 69).  Leaders must allow junior leaders to make decisions the lowest level; in result this builds confidence in developing leaders (Department of the Army, 2016, p. 66).

          Most importantly Sergeants Majors, along with commanders, must be present for training.  Leaders lead from the front.  Leaders who are present at training events emphasize to Soldiers that training is important.  Seniors must unglue themselves from behind their desk to visit their formations.  Training events provide opportunities to assess units, speak with Solders, and provide informal mentorship opportunities.

References: Department of the Army.  (2016). Train to win in a complex world (FM 7-0).  Retrieved from https://armypubs.army.mil/epubs/DR_pubs/DR_a/pdf/web/ARN9860_FM%207-0%20FINAL%20WEB.pdf Department of the Army.  (2017). Army training and leader development (AR 350-1).  Retrieved from https://armypubs.army.mil/ProductMaps/PubForm/Details.aspx?PUB_ID=1002540 Department of the Army.  (2019). Training (ADP 7-0).  Retrieved from https://armypubs.army.mil/epubs/DR_pubs/DR_a/pdf/web/ARN18024_ADP%207-0%20FINAL%20WEB.pdf

RUBRICS.pdf

Form 1009C

Contribution to Group Discussion Assessment

Levels of Achievement

Criteria Failed Unsatisfactory Marginal Developing Proficient Exemplary

Quality and Scope of Posted Content

0 to 5 points

No or irrelevant discussion participation.

6 to 8 points

Initial posting is not on topic; the content is unrelated to the discussion question; post demonstrates superficial thought and poor preparation. No depth in response to classmates; response does not relate directly, either conceptually or materially, to classmate postings.

9 to 11 points

Initial posting demonstrates a lack of reflection and answers few aspects of the discussion question; Development of concepts is not evident. Provides questionable comments of fails to offer new information to other posts; Responses do not promote further discussion of topic.

12 to 14 points

Initial posting demonstrates legitimate reflection and answers most aspects of the discussion question; full development of concepts is not evident. Provides relevant comments and new information to other posts; not all responses promote further discussion of topic.

15 to 17 points

Initial posting reveals a clear understanding of all aspects of the discussion question; uses factual and relevant information; demonstrates proficient development of concepts. Demonstrates understanding of other posts; extends discussion by building on previous posts and offering perspectives.

18 to 20 points

Initial posting demonstrates a thorough understanding of all aspects of the discussion question; uses factual and relevant information from scholarly sources; demonstrates full and insightful development of key concepts. Demonstrates critical analysis of other posts; extends meaningful discussion by building on previous posts and offering alternative perspectives.

Collaborative Communication Skills

0 to 5 points

No or irrelevant discussion participation.

6 to 8 points

Rarely provides useful ideas when participating in group discussions. Does not effectively engage with classmates by acknowledging and accepting other points of view. Publically critical of the work of others. Often displays unproductive communication that instigates a negative response rather than promotes collaboration.

9 to 11 points

Rarely provides useful ideas when participating in group discussions. Publically critical of the work of others. Rarely displays a positive narrative. Rarely shares with and supports the efforts of others. Sometimes causes undue tension or issues in the discussion forum.

12 to 14 points

Usually provides useful ideas when participating in group discussions. Rarely publically critical of the work of others. Often displays a positive narrative. Usually shares with and supports the efforts of others. Does not cause undue tension or issues in the discussion forum.

15 to 17 points

Routinely provides useful ideas when participating in group discussion. Never publically critical of the work of others. Always displays a positive narrative. Regularly shares with and supports the efforts of others. Maintains a productive and collaborative discussion with classmates.

18 to 20 points

Always provides creative ideas when participating in group discussion. Supports the work of others while keeping discussion on topic. Always displays a positive narrative. Regularly shares with and supports the efforts of others. Leads a productive and collaborative discussion with classmates.

Critical and Creative Thinking

0 to 5 points

No or irrelevant discussion participation.

6 to 8 points

Demonstrates a lack of proficiency in conceptualizing the problem; viewpoints and

9 to 11 points

Demonstrates limited or poor proficiency in conceptualizing the problem; viewpoints and

12 to 14 points

Demonstrates developing proficiency in conceptualizing and providing

15 to 17 points

Demonstrates considerable proficiency in conceptualizing the problem

18 to 20 points

Demonstrates mastery in conceptualizing the problem and presenting

Name

Description

Rubric Detail

Page 1 of 2

Levels of Achievement

Criteria Failed Unsatisfactory Marginal Developing Proficient Exemplary

assumptions of experts lack analysis and evaluation; conclusions are either absent or poorly conceived and supported.

assumptions of experts are not sufficiently analyzed, synthesized, and evaluated; conclusions are either poorly conceived and supported.

context to the problem; viewpoints and assumptions of experts are not sufficiently analyzed, synthesized, or evaluated; conclusions lack clear rationale.

and presenting appropriate perspectives; viewpoints and assumptions of experts are accurately analyzed, synthesized, and evaluated; conclusions are logically presented with applicable rationale.

logical perspectives; viewpoints and assumptions of experts are superbly analyzed, synthesized, and evaluated; conclusions are logically presented with detailed rationale.

Reference to Supporting Sources

0 to 5 points

No or irrelevant discussion participation.

6 to 8 points

Does not refer to assigned readings or other sources; fails to cite properly and/or cites questionable sources.

9 to 11 points

Refers to questionable sources. Attempts to cite sources with major deficiencies in citation format; fails to use two or more sources in initial post. Fails to use any source in response to classmates.

12 to 14 points

Refers to scholarly sources from assigned or outside reading and attempts to cite sources with few deficiencies in citation format; fails to use two or more sources in initial post.

15 to 17 points

Refers to and properly cites scholarly sources from assigned or outside reading and research with two or more sources cited in the initial post and at least one source cited in response to classmates.

18 to 20 points

Refers to and properly cites recent and relevant scholarly sources from assigned or outside reading and research with two or more sources cited in the initial post and at least one source cited in response to classmates.

Style and Mechanics

0 to 5 points

No or irrelevant discussion participation.

6 to 8 points

Writing contains numerous wordy, vague, or poorly constructed sentences. Frequent instances of grammar, spelling, and/or punctuation errors.

9 to 11 points

Writing contains few wordy, vague, or poorly constructed sentences. Occasional instances of grammar, spelling, and/or punctuation errors.

12 to 14 points

Writing displays a developing sense of academic writing with structurally sound sentences. 5-10 errors in grammar, spelling, and/or punctuation.

15 to 17 points

Writing displays a proficiency of academic writing with clearly written and structurally sound sentences. Less than 5 errors in grammar, spelling, and/or punctuation.

18 to 20 points

Writing displays a mastery of academic writing with clearly written and structurally sound sentences. No errors in grammar, spelling, and/or punctuation.

Assignment Requirements

-31 to -31 points

One or more posts contain plagiarism.

-15 to -15 points

Failed to meet assignment requirements and one or more submissions after due date.

-10 to -10 points

Failed to meet assignment requirements.

-5 to -5 points

One or more submissions after due date.

0 to 0 points

Met all requirements.

0 to 0 points

Met all requirements.

Page 2 of 2

DP POST # 1.docx

Top of Form

Sergeant’s Major Role in Unit Training Management

As CSM/SGM, Our duties and responsibilities are directly involved with our organization’s training and readiness. Training is the bedrock for our warrior’s readiness and a crucial element of keeping our warfighters well versed to succeed in a complex environment and be in a ready posture to conduct unified land operations. The Army does this by conducting tough, realistic, and challenging training (Department of the Army, 2016).

Training Development is a fundamental responsibility of a Sergeants Major. Each unit has a mission-essential task list (METL) that articulates exactly what tasks the unit must be proficient in to accomplish their mission. One of our leading role as Senior Enlisted Advisor is to provide tactical and technical recommendations to the Commanders on unit training priorities, certify leaders and oversee the delivery of all training, active presence in mission analysis, assists commanders visualized the organization plan, emphasized the Commander’s vision and intent to the lowest level.

Sergeants Major ensures that training is developed and supervised appropriately, reflects current doctrines and methodology, conducted professionally and is in line with the unit’s strategic requirements. The constant training cycle they develop and the management controls we Sergeants Major implemented to ensure all Soldiers meet training requirements while managing risk to both the individual and the unit.  There are many well-developed published doctrines and tools available to provide unit commanders and leaders with whatever they need to understand about their unit’s training needs — from mission-essential tasks to exercises to acquire proficiency in their individual warrior’s tasks and drills. Unit leadership must also understand the resources required to schedule, prepare, and carry out exercises, i.e., training aids, equipment, simulators, and simulations (TADSS).

As CSM/SGM, in order for us to achieve a high degree of readiness, we must empower all commanders and organizational leaders to include the Army’s principles of training into their training planning and executions. Train as you fight, Train to standard, Train to sustain, and Train to maintain (Department of the Army, 2019).  Applying those principles methodologies will enable realistic training with limited time and demands training proficiency from Soldiers. Principles of training will also create a fast, agile, lethal, and professional Soldiers to be efficiently and effectively warriors in our organizations.

References

Department of the Army. (2016) Train to Win in a Complex World (FM 7-0) Retrieved from https://armypubs.army.mil/epubs/DR_pubs/DR_a/pdf/web/ARN9860_FM%207-0

Department of the Army. (2019) Training (ADP 7-0) Retrieved from https://armypubs.army.mil/epubs/DR_pubs/DR_a/pdf/web/ARN18024_ADP%207-0%

Bottom of Form

DP POST # 2.docx