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 One submission per team
Submit paper here.
1500 – 3000 words
Organize the information to form a narrative
Write clearly
Provide sufficient information to plan demonstration
Information must be accurate
Sources (references) must be reliable 

Project 1 Demonstration Plan: Details

Describe in detail all the things you would need to do to set up a demonstration in practice. Be creative!! Your team can plan demonstrations using materials that are difficult to acquire: For example, a demonstration might include both air potatoes and air potato beetles, neither of which can be found in Indiana.

Submissions MUST include these items:

1. Statement of Purpose and Audience (Complete the statement: The purpose of this demonstration is….) 2. Education Goals (Who is your target audience? Complete the statement: People who view/interact with the demonstration will learn….) 3. Take home message (No more than 3 bullet points, and 27 words) 4. List of items needed for demonstration (Live animals or other display items that you would use if resources were available) 5. A narrative of how to set up your demonstration, who and how many presenters would be needed, and how the list of items would be used. Attach as appropriate (Poster, Pamphlet, Diagram of Display, Script of Dialog, Images, &c)

Examples 1. What is the purpose of your demonstration and who is your audience? Example: Purpose:  To promote the sale of locally produced specialty honey. Audience: Adult shoppers

2. What are your educational goals?? Example: A. Shoppers learn that honey flavor depends on the nectar source used by bees. B.  Shoppers learn about some more common natural sources of nectar. C. Shoppers learn about adulterated honey.

3. Take Home Message Example: Honey quality varies Local beekeepers supply quality honey and honey varieties Support your local beekeepers

4. List all items you would need for your demonstration, plus how and where you might procure them. Example: a) Four different types of honey: Clover, Buckwheat, Orange Blossom, Blue Berry, -Purchased or donated from a local beekeeper b) Honey bear dispensers- buy online (source); c) Water and paper towels for sticky hands- Local store d) Display poster – to be made by team e) Brochure- to be made by team f) Display table- Borrow from a friend g….) &c……..

5. By reading your narrative, someone not in your group should be able to present your demonstration.

Example: We will have a table with a poster about how honey is made.

Presenter 1 encourages people to come to the table Script: “Welcome. Would you like to taste different types of honey? We have samples of clover honey, buckwheat and blueberry honey. Take a stirrer and squeeze honey onto the end to get a taste. Put your stirrer in the trash can when finished”

People will take tastes of honey by squeezing honey out of a honey bear onto a coffee stirrer. People will be able to compare different types of honey.

Presenter 2 will be in charge of making sure the used stirrers are placed in the trash and wipe up any honey spills

Presenter 3 will answer questions honey We anticipate being asked the following questions:

FAQ and script: Q1 How do bees make honey? A Bees visit flowers and drink nectar. The nectar contains sugars, other nutrients and flavors. The nectar is stored in the crop or stomach of the bee. The bee returns to the hive and empties its crop into a cell of a honeycomb. Worker bees ingest the nectar add enzymes and put it back

in the cells repeatedly. They evaporate the water. The honey is nectar with added substances from bees that has been processed by worker bees.

Q2 How do you collect buckwheat honey? A bee hive has a box on top called a super. The beekeeper will move the hive into a field of buckwheat and place a new super on top. Bees will repeatedly visit the same type of flower if they are close and a good source of nectar and pollen. The honey produced in the super will almost all be from buckwheat nectar. The beekeeper removes the super and collects the buckwheat honey. Q3… Q4… …… Q10

Project 1 Demonstration Details.html

Project 1 Demonstration Details

You do not actually do the demonstration.

You must describe in detail what you would do in practice.

This allows you to plan demonstrations using materials that are difficult to acquire:  For example, a demonstration might include both air potatoes and air potato beetles, neither of which can be found in Indiana.

BE CREATIVE!

Submissions MUST include these items:

1.  Statement of Purpose  (Complete the statement:  The purpose of this demonstration is….)

2.  Education Goals (Complete the statement:  People who view/interact with the demonstration will learn….)

3.  Take home message (No more than 3 bullet points, and 27 words)

4.  List of items needed for demonstration  (Live animals or other display items that you would use if resources were available)

5. A narrative of how to set up your demonstration, who and how many presenters would be needed, and how the list of items would be used.  Attach as appropriate (Poster. Pamphlet, Diagram of Display, Script of Dialog, Images, &c)

Examples for 1-4:  

1. What is the purpose of your demonstration and who is your audience?

Example:

Purpose:  To promote the sale of locally produced specialty honey.

Audience: Adult shoppers

2. What are your educational goals??

Example:

A. Shoppers learn that honey flavor depends on the nectar source used by bees.

B.  Shoppers learn about some more common natural sources of nectar.

C. Shoppers learn about adulterated honey.

3.  

Take Home MessageExample:Honey quality variesLocal beekeepers supply quality honey and honey varietiesSupport your local beekeepers

4. List all items you would need for your demonstration, plus how and where you might procure them.

Example:

a) Four different types of honey: Clover, Buckwheat, Orange Blossom, Blue Berry, -Purchased or donated from a local beekeeper

b) Honey bear dispensors- buy online (source);

c) Water and paper towels for sticky hands- Local store

d) Display poster – to be made by team

e) Brochure- to be made by team

f) Display table- Borrow from a friend

g….)  &c……..

5. By reading your narrative, someone not in your group should be able to present your demonstration.

Project 1 Instructions

Team Project 1 is an exploration of technologies that stem from insects or the study of insects. Each topic involves a) that insects are used as biological agents; b) products made by insects or c) biomimetic materials that are modeled on insect features. Project 1 has 2 components: 1. Research the literature on the topic and write a report. Links below can start

your research on track. Optional video links are in the folder below. 2. Describe a demonstration or hands on activity to educate the public about the

topic. See ”Demonstration Details” for further information.

Getting Started: Each team will choose one of the following topics. Discuss topics with your team and choose a topic. Complete your research with the idea that you need information that could be useful for a demonstration.

1. Antibacterial Properties of Insect Wings Many insects have surfaces that are superhydrophobic and prevent microorganisms from adhering to the surface. This helps to keep the insects free of infection. However, some bacteria are observed to stick to some insect wings. A group of scientists* noted that Pseudomonus bacteria would adhere to the wings of the Clanger cicada, Psaltoda claripennis, but were quickly killed on the wing surface. Further investigation suggests that the bacteria are killed by the physical nano- structure of the wing and not by a chemical-antibiotic. The cicada wings have conical nano-scale “pillars” about 200 nm tall and only 30 nm wide at the top. The distance between neighboring pillars averages about 170 nm. The bacteria stick to the tops of the pillars and the bacteria membrane stretches as it sags into the “valleys” between the pillars. Too much stretching will physically rupture the bacterial membrane and its contents will leak. A model of this process is posted on YouTube. Cicada wings may be a model for future antibacterial biomaterials. *Pogodin and Colleagues. Biophysical Model of Bacterial Cell Interactions with Nano-patterned Cicada Wing Surfaces Biophysical Journal. 2013. 104:835–840

2. Black soldier flies as animal feed Black soldier flies feed on compost and other food waste. The adult flies are not nuisances as are house flies. The pupae sterilize their gut and pupate outside the food. This eliminates microorganism contamination. They are used as fish food and chicken feed. https://livingwithinsects.wordpress.com/2017/02/20/living-with-black-soldier-flies/ https://livingwithinsects.wordpress.com/2016/07/26/insects-as-feed/ (See video in Biomaterials)http://www.cell.com/biophysj/retrieve/pii/S0006349513000039http://www.cell.com/biophysj/retrieve/pii/S0006349513000039http://youtu.be/JDOEAUdqJGkhttps://livingwithinsects.wordpress.com/2017/02/20/living-with-black-soldier-flies/

3. Carmine Dye Cochineal, (Dactylopius coccus) is a North American scale insect that produces carminic acid, a chemical that deters potential predators. When the scale insects are ground to a powder and mixed with calcium or aluminum salts, the brilliant red dye, carmine is produced. Carminic acid can reach concentrations of up to 24 percent of the body weight of the insect. The Native Americans of the desert western North America were known to rear cochineal for dye manufacture. They quite probably bred cochineal for high carminic acid content. In the 1500s, cochineal was an important trade item. A chest full of carmine at that time was worth more than a chest filled with gold. Carmine was used as a dye for clothing, a colorant in paints, foods and cosmetics. https://livingwithinsects.wordpress.com/2015/08/16/cochineal-on-exhibit/ https://livingwithinsects.wordpress.com/2013/10/23/getting-the-bugs-out-of- skittles/ https://livingwithinsects.wordpress.com/2014/10/05/painting-with-insect-pigments/

4. Chitosan uses in bandages and medicine Chitosan is a natural polysaccharide derived from chitin, the second most abundant polysaccharide in the world. Chitin is widely found in nature, and large volumeshttps://livingwithinsects.wordpress.com/2015/08/16/cochineal-on-exhibit/https://livingwithinsects.wordpress.com/2013/10/23/getting-the-bugs-out-of-skittles/https://livingwithinsects.wordpress.com/2013/10/23/getting-the-bugs-out-of-skittles/

are in the exoskeletons of crustaceans (such as crabs, lobsters, shellfish and shrimps). The processing of chitin into chitosan results in a positively charged molecule that allows it to interact with many negatively charged molecules such as gram-positive bacteria, blood cells, proteins, metals and lipids. Chitosan’s unique characteristics give it a variety of applications in medicine, such as orthopaedics, tissue engineering, drug delivery, surgical adhesion and wound management. Bandages made from chitosan are much more efficient at clotting blood than cotton bandages. https://livingwithinsects.wordpress.com/2010/09/05/cuticle-biomaterials/

5. Cyborg Insects Cyborg insects are part insect part machine. With current technology, it is more feasible to implant devices for controlling insects than to build an insect sized robot that can perform as well as an insect. Cyborgs may be useful for surveillance missions such as locating earthquake victims trapped in rubble. https://livingwithinsects.wordpress.com/2012/09/08/cyborg-cockroaches-to-the- rescue/ https://livingwithinsects.wordpress.com/2011/09/16/self-powered-cyborg-insects/ https://livingwithinsects.wordpress.com/2011/11/11/living-with-insect-power/ See the Biomaterials lecture for video clipshttps://livingwithinsects.wordpress.com/2010/09/05/cuticle-biomaterials/https://livingwithinsects.wordpress.com/2012/09/08/cyborg-cockroaches-to-the-rescue/https://livingwithinsects.wordpress.com/2012/09/08/cyborg-cockroaches-to-the-rescue/

6. Insect cells for vaccine production Insect cells can be grown in a liquid nutrient broth. They can be genetically modified to express proteins including the hemagglutinin proteins of flu viruses necessary to produce vaccines. Unlike bacteria, insects have eukaryotic cells that correctly process (glycosylate) the protein. Thus, insect cells are an excellent system for producing the large amounts of hemagglutinin needed to produce an influenza vaccine. The use of the cloned hemagglutinin is safer and less likely to have adverse side effects than virus produced in chicken eggs.[Added bonus: Insect cell vaccines are vegan!] In insect cells, the vaccine can be produced in greater quantities and in a shorter time than by using chicken eggs. Timeliness is critical in a flu epidemic. https://www.cdc.gov/flu/protect/vaccine/qa_flublok-vaccine.htm https://livingwithinsects.wordpress.com/2013/02/03/living-with-insect-produced- vaccines/

7. Moth Eye Antireflective Surfaces Moths fly at night and must maximize the light going into the eye and minimize the reflected light. Smooth, flat create surfaces reflect light surface (like a mirror). Reflection of light might signal their location to predators.The surface of the moth eye is covered with protuberances of the cuticle called “corneal nipples”.that reduce glare and reflection. Reduction of glare and reflection has technical applications. “Moth Eye” synthetic films can be manufactured that have nipples on their surface. Moth-eye films have a variety of uses including window coatings, camera lenses, cell phone displays and computer screens. You can purchase a moth eye film for your phone that makes it easier to read in the sunlight. Moth eye films can be used in solar cells to reduce the reflectance of the surface. Less light lost to reflectance translates into more light entering the solar cell, increasing its efficiency. https://livingwithinsects.wordpress.com/2011/01/25/the-motes-in-the-moths-eyes/ https://livingwithinsects.wordpress.com/2012/10/04/a-moth-eye-solution-2/

8 Shellac Shellac is made from the secretions of a scale insect native to India, Kerria lacca. Tree branches containing the feeding scale insects are clipped from the trees and soaked in a solvent. The solvent dissolves the waxes secreted by these insects. The solvent is evaporated leaving a hard material, shellac. Shellac is painted onto wood and other surfaces as a protective coating against water. Other uses includehttps://www.cdc.gov/flu/protect/vaccine/qa_flublok-vaccine.htmhttp://www.opticsinfobase.org/oe/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-19-102-A118https://livingwithinsects.wordpress.com/2011/01/25/the-motes-in-the-moths-eyes/https://livingwithinsects.wordpress.com/2012/10/04/a-moth-eye-solution-2/

coatings on candies and pharmaceuticals. Before the invention of vinyl, phonograph records in early 20th century were made from shellac. https://livingwithinsects.wordpress.com/2015/10/05/living-with-shellac-coatings/ https://livingwithinsects.wordpress.com/2015/09/06/shellac-all-natural-eco- friendly/ https://livingwithinsects.wordpress.com/2014/09/10/shellac-vegetable-protection/ https://livingwithinsects.wordpress.com/2013/10/22/shellac-for-food-safety/ https://livingwithinsects.wordpress.com/2013/10/20/living-with-shellac/ https://livingwithinsects.wordpress.com/2015/10/06/living-with-shiny-apples/

9. Silk Commercial silk is made from cocoons of the silkworm. Silkworms have been cultured for thousands of years. They are the second most important insect commercially after the honey bee.. Silk has a number of properties. This project should explore both how silk is produced and used. https://livingwithinsects.wordpress.com/2017/03/06/living-with-silk/ https://www.vox.com/2014/11/20/7253493/sericulture-silk-worm-spithttps://livingwithinsects.wordpress.com/2015/09/06/shellac-all-natural-eco-friendly/https://livingwithinsects.wordpress.com/2015/09/06/shellac-all-natural-eco-friendly/https://livingwithinsects.wordpress.com/2013/10/22/shellac-for-food-safety/https://livingwithinsects.wordpress.com/2015/10/06/living-with-shiny-apples/https://livingwithinsects.wordpress.com/2017/03/06/living-with-silk/https://www.vox.com/2014/11/20/7253493/sericulture-silk-worm-spit