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05_02.pdf

Leading with Emotional Intelligence with Britt Andreatta

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Facilitating Teams The Four Gates to Peak Team Performance™ model is based on my research on the brain science of teams and collaboration. What I discovered is that people are biologically wired to assess a variety of aspects, which determines their overall ability to contribute their full energy and enthusiasm to the team/project. There are four stages, or gates, the group can move through. The effects of each gate are cumulative, meaning a sufficient level must be achieved in the previous gate to open the next gate. The team’s overall potential is comprised of the sum total of each member’s individual experience so if enough people do not feel safe in Gate 1, then the team cannot progress through Gate 2, and so on. Leaders play a critical role in setting up teams for success or failure.

Gate 1: Safety Members are sorting for physical safety as well as psychological safety and inclusion.

When the group is first convened and through the first few meetings, people subconsciously assess for how likely they are to experience the following from the leader and/or other members:

• Physical harm from safety issues and/or workplace violence

• Bullying and/or harassment

• Career harm via leader’s assessment/review

• Rejection by or exclusion from team

As a result of early interactions, members determine that they are safe or have to be on guard in some way.

Considerations: Consider how you can design the early meetings of the group to set them for success in Gates 1 and 2.

How can you provide as many in-person interactions as possible?

How might you construct these to facilitate them getting to know each other on a deeper level and building the groundwork for future trust?

How can you create an environment where they feel safe, both physically and psychologically, with you and each other?

Leading with Emotional Intelligence with Britt Andreatta

Leading with Emotional Intelligence with Britt Andreatta

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Gate 2: Purpose Members are exploring the purpose of the group/project and how they might contribute.

Over the course of several interactions, people subconsciously assess the following:

• Clarity of the task and group’s purpose

• The group’s ability and/or likelihood of success based on the parameters of the project

and support provided

• How likely they can contribute their individual strengths

• If the group is establishing a “sense of we”

At the end of this gate, individual members have either decided to hold back or lean in with their energy and enthusiasm.

Considerations: How can you provide the information they need to determine the purpose of the group/project? What is the “why” behind the project?

How can you best articulate the parameters of the project, including milestones and deadlines?

How can you ensure that each member can contribute his/her strengths?

How will they determine who plays what key roles in the group’s success, including:

• Gather information

• Analyze data

• Coordinate efforts

• Track progress

• Quality assurance

• Provide leadership

• Ensure cohesiveness and camaraderie

• Other:

Leading with Emotional Intelligence with Britt Andreatta

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Help the group create agreed-upon practices or ground rules for working together, including:

• Expectations for personal and interpersonal conduct

• Methods for building trust and psychological safety

• How and when we value and recognize members’ efforts and contributions

• Criteria for evaluating ideas

• Process for making decisions

• Communication flow and format

• Criteria for measuring success

• Accountability via consequences

• Process for resolving inevitable conflict

Gate 3: Belonging Members are sorting for a sufficient amount of trust and respect in order to feel a deep sense of belonging. Then they can fully commit emotionally to being part of a well-working team. Over the course of several interactions, people subconsciously assess the following:

• How respected and/or valued they feel by the leader and members

• The amount they trust each of the members and leader

• Whether they feel safe enough to take risks and make mistakes

• The ability to resolve conflict effectively

At the end of this gate, individual members are collaborating well and are primed to move into peak performance. However, they can only get there if every member feels this way. If anyone is experiencing issues with safety, purpose, or belonging, the team cannot enter the fourth gate until things are resolved.

Considerations: How can you provide opportunities for the group to spend time together where they can deepen their relationships and build trust?

How can you create an environment where it is safe to take risks and make mistakes?

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Help the group explore the differences between coordination, cooperation, and collaboration. Discuss with them what training or support they need to move more fully into collaboration

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Gate 4: Peak Performing Members are operating as a highly collaborative and cohesive unit. Nothing is held back as they are fully engaged in the project and completely committed to the team. They have a lot of fun together, regularly engage in innovative work, and are able to overcome challenges quickly and easily.

Considerations: At this stage, you want to support the group in continuing as they are and protecting them from anything that might derail their peak state. Possibilities include:

• An established member leaving. Depending on that person’s role and contributions, the group

may or may not be able to absorb their absence.

• A new member joining. The group will need to go back to Gate 1 to fully integrate the new person)

• The team leader leaving. If the group is self-sufficient, they can probably continue on as they are,

but when the new leader arrives, they will need to start back at Gate 1.

• The goal or purpose of the project changes. You’ll need to revisit Gate 2 again to realign but the

group may be able to quickly move through Gate 3 and get back to Gate 4.

• Some other challenge or crisis arises that impacts the group or members doing their work. If it

changes the group’s sense of safety, purpose, or belonging, then the group needs to go back to

Gate 1, but otherwise, they may be able to resolve the challenge through their innovation and

collaboration.

Given your groups and the projects they work on, identify some challenge that is likely to arise and the actions you can take to either prevent them or to help the group quickly resolve them.

If you’d like to bring the Four Gates to Peak Team Performance™ to your organization, visit www.BrittAndreattaTraining.com.http://www.BrittAndreattaTraining.com

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05_04.pdf

Leading with Emotional Intelligence with Britt Andreatta

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Inspirational Leadership In the exercise files, I have included a handout to help you articulate your passion and vision. Use it to help you craft your message.

Here are some questions you can use as a catalyst in clarifying your vision. Let yourself respond off the top of your head. Don’t worry about if it sounds feasible or silly or if you can see a connection to your current work/role.

What do you have a burning passion about?

What work do you find absorbing, involving, enthralling?

In what do you totally and absolutely believe?

What future would you invent for yourself and your organization/community?

How do you want to change the world for yourself and for your organization/community?

What is a dream for your life that excites you

What legacy do you want to leave behind?

Leading with Emotional Intelligence with Britt Andreatta

Leading with Emotional Intelligence with Britt Andreatta

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“Leadership is the art of mobilizing others to want to struggle for shared aspirations.” —Jim Kouzes and Barry Posner, The Leadership Challenge, Third Edition

Jim Kouzes and Barry Posner have interviewed thousands of leaders around the world to explore what distinguishes the best leaders from the rest. They discovered that strong leaders consistently utilize five practices, which they describe in their book, The Leadership Challenge. The Five Practices of Exemplary Leadership are Challenging the Process, Inspiring a Shared Vision, Enabling Others to Act, Modeling the Way, and Encouraging the Heart.

Inspiring a Shared Vision This practice is about how the leader looks to the future. Strong leaders dream about what could be and have a long-term vision for the development of the organization. Leaders are able to involve others in the organization in both creating the vision and bringing it into reality. This vision ultimately gives direction and purpose to all the members.

Leaders who utilize this practice envision the future by imagining exciting and ennobling possibilities.

Jot down some thoughts or ideas you have.

How can you bring your vision alive? Consider how you might use the following (pick at least three and make some notes about how you might use them):

Images and word pictures

Metaphors

Examples

Stories

References to history

Emotions

Symbols

Data/statistics

Leading with Emotional Intelligence with Britt Andreatta

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Next, effective leaders enlist others in a common vision by appealing to shared aspirations.

How might you appeal to the group’s common interests?

How might you expand that appeal to the interests of individuals?

How might you create a range of messaging that will appeal or interest different groups or types of people? Identify three possibilities for varying your message.

How can you connect your vision to the values, practices, and mission of the organization or subgroups/ functions within it?

How can you help people see how their day-to-day work will contribute to this larger vision?

As you review what you have written, identify some next steps. Again, I encourage you to read the following books:

The Leadership Challenge by Jim Kouzes and Barry Posner

Leading at a Higher Level by Ken Blanchard

Remember, the world needs what you have to contribute!

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03_02.pdf

Leading with Emotional Intelligence with Britt Andreatta

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Understanding Triggers In this activity, you’ll learn more about your triggers. First, you’ll want to become very familiar with your amygdala hijack and your response pattern.

A. The Amygdala Hijack First, indicate on this diagram where in your body you feel your reaction. Some common locations include the jaw, chest, and stomach, but some people feel things in their hands, feet, throat, and even ears. Describe the sensation you feel as accurately as you can. Perhaps your heart races or pounds. Maybe you get flushed or you start to sweat.

Leading with Emotional Intelligence with Britt Andreatta

Leading with Emotional Intelligence with Britt Andreatta

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Fight Response Reflect on the times when you have gone to fight or a form of aggression. Describe the last two or three times this has happened. What did you do and say? Consider how you have used verbal and nonverbal methods to convey aggression, criticism, contempt, sarcasm, or shame.

Flight/Freeze Response Reflect on the times when you have gone to flight/freeze or a form of withdrawal. Describe the last two or three times this has happened. What did you do and say? Consider how you have used verbal and nonverbal methods to convey withdrawal, such as stonewalling, defensiveness, excuses, or blaming.

When you consider the two responses, which one is your most common pattern? Under stress, which is your most typical response?

Leading with Emotional Intelligence with Britt Andreatta

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B. Common Triggers Think over the past three to five years in both your professional and personal life. List the situations where you have felt triggered. This might include times you felt someone was “pushing your buttons” or that you were hijacked by your fight or flight response.

Take notes on what happened—who did what to set it off? What feelings did you have? And what hijack response did you experience?

Review this information and identify your top three to five triggers. Step back from the details of any one particular incident and look for patterns where the situations feel similar or familiar.

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03_03.pdf

Leading with Emotional Intelligence with Britt Andreatta

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Managing Your Triggers A. Your Fire Drill In the future, when your triggers fire off, what can you do to manage them? Identify two or three things you can do in the immediate moment to recognize that you are triggered and to feel safer or calm. You may need different actions for each trigger. The goal is to have a plan for each of your top four to six triggers.

Trigger #1:

Fire Drill:

Trigger #4:

Fire Drill:

Trigger #2:

Fire Drill:

Trigger #5:

Fire Drill:

Trigger #3:

Fire Drill:

Trigger #6:

Fire Drill:

Leading with Emotional Intelligence with Britt Andreatta

Leading with Emotional Intelligence with Britt Andreatta

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B. Heal Your Triggers Next, take the top two triggers that you experience at work and/or your role as a leader. We’re going to explore their history—the goal is to find the source of the trigger—the original time something happened that created this sensitivity. Other people or situations may have been deepening the trigger over time, but all triggers have a source. For some, you will immediately know the origin. But if it’s not clear, follow the path back in time: think about previous times that were similar and keep going back until you feel that you have discovered the first one. Jot down what happened, who was involved, and how it made you feel.

Trigger: Trigger:

Now that you have found the source, reflect on how else that original situation affects you. How does it show up in your life? How is it reflected in your beliefs about yourself and the world? How has it limited your experiences or opportunities?

Trigger: Trigger:

Finally, how would you like to transform this trigger? Triggers can significantly shift or even disappear if we deal with the source of the issue. Some effective strategies include working with a coach or therapist. If the trigger is particularly traumatic, techniques such as EMDR and Brainspotting

B. Heal Your Triggers Next, take the top two triggers that you experience at work and/or your role as a leader. We’re going to explore their history—the goal is to find the source of the trigger—the original time something happened that created this sensitivity. Other people or situations may have been deepening the trigger over time, but all triggers have a source. For some, you will immediately know the origin. But if it’s not clear, follow the path back in time: think about previous times that were similar and keep going back until you feel that you have discovered the first one. Jot down what happened, who was involved, and how it made you feel.

Trigger: Trigger:

Now that you have found the source, reflect on how else that original situation affects you. How does it show up in your life? How is it reflected in your beliefs about yourself and the world? How has it limited your experiences or opportunities?

Trigger: Trigger:

Finally, how would you like to transform this trigger? Triggers can significantly shift or even disappear if we deal with the source of the issue. Some effective strategies include working with a coach or therapist. If the trigger is particularly traumatic, techniques such as EMDR and Brainspotting

Leading with Emotional Intelligence with Britt Andreatta

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(https://brainspotting.com/) have been proven to be very effective in reducing the lingering physical and emotional effects of trauma. Create your action plan for how you will transform each trigger.

Trigger: Trigger:

If you wish, you can repeat this exercise with your remaining triggers.https://brainspotting.com/

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04_02.pdf

Leading with Emotional Intelligence with Britt Andreatta

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Extending Empathy A. Reading emotions in others Before you can extend empathy, you first must become skilled at reading emotions in others. The Greater Good Science Center at the University of California at Berkeley has a great online quiz (http:// greatergood.berkeley.edu/ei_quiz/) to help you read the emotions of others. The quiz shows you how to read the key zones of the face (eyes, nose, mouth, head tilt) to correctly identify emotions in others.

In addition, vocal cues and body language add additional layers of meaning. Consider how the following vocal cues affect the meaning of a person’s communication:

• Intensity = volume or loudness

• Pitch = how high or low the sound is (similar to musical scale)

• Intonation = how our voice rises and falls with certain words or meanings

• Pace = rate of talking or the speed

• Enunciation = how clearly syllables are spoken or articulated

• Silence = nonvocal aspects like pauses, sighs, and gasps

The Science of People organization has another great online quiz to help you decode body language more accurately. Learn more at https://www.scienceofpeople.com/body-language/

Remember, our brain is designed to read these cues in others, but we lose most of the relevant information when we go online. If you are experiencing challenges in your communication, shift to in-person interactions. If that is not possible, then at least use video where you have visual and auditory cues. The most biologically deprived form is email or texting because we lose all of the data our brains were built to assess.

B.Extending empathy Review the four qualities of empathy by watching the short animation video “Brené Brown on Empathy” on YouTube at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Evwgu369Jw.

Reflect on times you have been on the receiving end of sympathy and someone used the phrase “at least… “ to you. What was the situation and how did it make you feel?

Contrast that with a time someone engaged with you from a place of genuine empathy. What did they do and say? How did it make you feel?

Leading with Emotional Intelligence with Britt Andreattahttps://www.scienceofpeople.com/body-language/https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Evwgu369Jw

Leading with Emotional Intelligence with Britt Andreatta

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Consider a few colleagues at your work now. How could you practice the four qualities of empathy with them?

1. The ability to take the perspective of another person or recognize that their perspective is their truth

2. Staying out of judgment

3. Recognizing emotions in other people and then communicating that to them (e.g., me too)

4. Feeling with people—instead of projecting how you would feel in the same situation, seeing how they are feeling and getting in touch with your own experience of that feeling

Explore the impact that blame has on empathy by watching the short animation video “Brené Brown on Blame” on YouTube at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RZWf2_2L2v8.

Reflect on a time you did a “Damn you, Steve” moment similar to what Brené shared.

In your organization, how often do people engage in looking for who/what to blame? Jot down some examples of times you have witnessed and/or participated in it.

Research shows that blame is simply the discharging of discomfort and pain. In the situations you just listed, what was the underlying discomfort or pain that was being expressed? How could you help guide your organization to a more productive pattern?https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RZWf2_2L2v8

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